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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 30, 1956

    Report from Politburo members Mikoyan and Suslov on the crisis in Hungary

    Mikoyan-Suslov Report on the deterioration of the political situation in Hungary. the report states that popular forces are taking over the radio station and the post office and that the Imre Nagy government does not want to use force against the uprising. Fearful of a strong reaction from the UN Security Council, Mikoyan and Suslov suggest that the Soviet leadership stop the inlux of Red Army units in Hungary for the time being.

  • October 30, 1956

    Protocol No. 58 of the Meeting of the Political Bureau of the CC of the RWP Which Adopted Some Measures to Ensure Order in Romania Given the Events Taking Place in Hungary

    Summary of the decisions taken at the meeting of the RWP Politburo concerning actions to be taken in conjunction with the developments in Hungary.

  • October 30, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 30 October 1956

    The Presidium decides to promulgate a declaration on Hungary in which Soviet withdrawal and relations with the new government will be addressed. Members discuss the language of the new declaration and the advice of the CPC CC regarding the status of Soviet troops. The declaration is also intended to address the broader crisis in Soviet relations with people’s democracies.

  • October 31, 1956

    Resolution of the Presidium of the Central Committee About the Situation in Hungary (Protocol 49)

    This resolution instructs the Soviet Ambassador to Belgrade to transmit a letter to Tito requesting a secret meeting on November 1 or 2 with Khrushchev and Malenkov. It also empowers certain members to conduct negotiations with the United Workers Party of Poland.

  • October 31, 1956

    Draft telegram to Italian Communist Leader Palmiro Togliatti

    Draft telegram from the CPSU CC to Italian Communist Leader Palmiro Togliatti on the Soviet leadership's position on the situation in Hungary.

  • October 31, 1956

    Notes of a Telephone Message from F. N. Gryaznov, a Counselor at the Soviet Embassy in Yugoslavia

    Tito, currently in Brioni, requests that a meeting with Khrushchev and Malenkov is relocated to Brioni, as Tito is forbidden to leave due to illness.

  • October 31, 1956

    Gazette of the State Council of the People's Republic of China, 1956, No. 39 (Overall Issue No. 65)

    This issue begins with a joint statement from Premier Zhou Enlai and the Prime Minister of Pakistan, Huseyn Shaheed Suhrawardy. It also covers Sino-Egyptian trade and outlines organizational guidelines for the "expert bureau." Other sections discuss relaxing the rural market, problems related to rural finances, and managing teachers' benefits.

  • October 31, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 31 October 1956

    Khrushchev and members of the CPSU CC Presidium decide to not withdraw Soviet troops from Hungary. Negotiations with Tito and the situation in Yugoslavia are also mentioned.

  • November 01, 1956

    CDS Report No. 22 from Choi Duk Shin to the President (Syngman Rhee)

    Choi Duk Shin reports on South Vietnam's National Day celebrations, the introduction of Vietnam's constitution, and recent Vietnamese political affairs, including the arrest of a Japanese fishing boat.

  • November 01, 1956

    Egyptian Activities in Lebanon

  • November 01, 1956

    Andropov Report, 1 November 1956

    Andropov reports that Imre Nagy has threatened a scandal and the resignation of the government if the Soviet Union continues to send troops into Hungary. In his meeting with Nagy, Andropov is told that Hungary is withdrawing from the Warsaw Pact and will further request a UN guarantee of Hungarian neutrality if Soviet troop movements into Hungary do not stop. The report notes that after the meeting the Hungarian government informed the Embassy of its decision to leave the Warsaw Pact.

  • November 01, 1956

    Bulgarian Military Intelligence Information on the Situation in Hungary and Poland

    This intelligence report discusses the domestic political developments in Poland after the ascent of Wladyslaw Gomulka to the top of the Polish United Workers' Party (PZPR).The events surrounding the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 are also mentioned.

  • November 01, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 1 November 1956

    At this session of the Presidium, Mikoyan argues that in the face of a universal demand for troop withdrawal the best option is to support the Hungarian government. Mikoyan promotes negotiations over force. The other members support the application of force to put down the uprising. Supporters of force refer to the necessity of keeping Hungary within the Soviet sphere and preventing the uprising from spreading to other Eastern European nations.

  • November 02, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 2 November 1956

    A plan outlining military measures against Hungary was presented at this session of the Presidium. The notes reflect that fear of fascist influence in Hungary motivated adoption.

  • November 02, 1956

    Phone Conversation on Guidance for Radio Free Europe Broadcasts

    Radio Free Europe (RFE) Director Conerey Egan in New York telephones RFE Deputy Director Richard Condon in Munich to direct that RFE should report Hungarian developments and insurgent demands but not take a position for or against individual leaders or political parties.

  • November 02, 1956

    Policy Considerations for Radio Liberty Broadcasts

    CIA redistributes a State Department message of November 1 endorsing RL’s [temporary] ban on commentary on Hungarian events.

  • November 02, 1956

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Hungary, ‘The Hungarian Paper Justice Incorrectly Interpreted Our Statement’

    The Chinese Embassy in Budapest reports that the "counterrevolutionaries intentionally misinterpreted" China's stance on the events in Hungary

  • November 02, 1956

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, ‘On Our Attitude towards Hungary’

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry says that "'much listening, little speaking' is necessary” with regards to the Hungarian Revolution.

  • November 02, 1956

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Hungary, ‘On the Meeting between Imre Nagy and Ambassador Hao Deqing’

    The Chinese Embassy in Hungary provides a lengthy report on the talks between Imre Nagy and Hao Deqing.

  • November 02, 1956

    Working Notes from the Session of the CPSU CC Presidium on 2 November 1956

    The CPSU CC Presidium is confronted with reports from Hungary of mass demonstrations, armed counterrevolutionary groups, and the support for Nagy by the opposition. The CC is told about the Hungarian decision to declare neutrality and the likely confrontation between Soviet and Hungarian troops should the former continue to advance toward Budapest. Also discussed is the split within the HWP and possible Soviet responses.