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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 17, 1952

    Hand-delivered letter, Filippov (Stalin) to Mao Zedong

    Letter from Stalin to Mao stating the position the USSR will take regarding the Mexican UN proposal, and stating his agreement with Mao regarding the issues of POW repatriation and diplomatic exchanges with India and Burma.

  • September 19, 1952

    Minutes of Conversation between I.V. Stalin and Zhou Enlai

    Conversation between Stalin and Zhou Enlai focusing on the Korean War. They discussed the exchange of POWs (and the Mexican proposal), peace negotiations, Chinese cooperation with India and Burma, and the creation of regional organizations. They also mentioned Germany (reunification), the situation/reforms in Xinjiang, Taiwan and Chiang Kaishek (Jiang Jieshi), and military aid.

  • September 20, 1952

    Report, Zhou Enlai to the Chairman [Mao Zedong], Comrade [Liu] Shaoqi, and the Central Committee

    Zhou and Stalin discuss potential meetings with representatives from Vietnam, Indonesia, and Japan.

  • September 22, 1952

    Report, Zhou Enlai to the Chairman [Mao Zedong] and the Central Committee

    Zhou and Stalin discuss the POW issue, the United Nations and the formation of a new regional organization for Asia, and military cooperation.

  • November 03, 1952

    CPSU Politburo Decision with an Approved Message from Pushkin to Stalin

    Decision to approve the draft TASS publication denying the reported talks between the Soviet Union and the United States on the Korean issue.

  • December 27, 1952

    Telegram from Stalin to Mao Zedong

    Stalin agrees to send ammunitions to Mao in preparation for a US attack.

  • January 01, 1953

    Soviet Plan to Assassinate Tito

    NKVD plan to assassinate Josip Broz Tito by a Soviet covert agent, codenamed “Max.” The plan envisions assassinating Tito during a private audience during Tito’s forthcoming visit to London, or at a diplomatic reception in Belgrade. This document was not dated.

  • January 15, 1953

    Ciphered Telegram from Semenov [Stalin] to Mao Zedong

    Stalin informs Mao that his request was impossible to complete at the time, but that the Soviet government is able to send 600,000 units of ammunition and 332 guns. The ammunition will be supplied monthly from January-April, 150,000 each month. The guns will also be supplied monthly from January-February, 166 guns each month.

  • January 28, 1953

    Ciphered Telegram from Semenov [Stalin] to Mao Zedong

    Stalin informs Mao that the Soviets are able to deliver 10 torpedo boats, 83 aircrafts - of which 32 are torpedo bombers TU-2, 35 are LA-11 fighter aircrafts -, 26 guns (37 mm), 8 guns (180mm), and ammunition. As for advisors, they're able to send an additional three.

  • February 18, 1953

    CPSU Politburo Decision Along with Proposals from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Ministry of Foreign Trade

    Decision to adopt the proposal made by the Minister of Foreign Trade and Minister of Foreign Affairs, and to defer the DPRK's loan payments represented in the Agreement of 14 November 1951.

  • February 18, 1953

    Indian Ambassador to the Soviet Union K. P. S. Menon Interview with Stalin

    Menon and Stalin meet in Moscow to discuss Indo-Soviet relations. The two speak on issues including India's ethnic makeup and prospects for Indian military and economic development.

  • 1954

    Telegram from Gromyko to Stalin with a Resolution and Approved Telegram to Razuvaev

    Gromyko goes over the rules established in the Geneva Conference.

  • February 24, 1956

    Excerpts from Tsedenbal's diary on his conversation with Soviet leader Anastas Mikoyan on Soviet Economic Cooperation and Aid to the People's Republic of Mongolia (Fragments)

    Tsedenbal's diary entry on his conversation with Anastas Mikoyan regarding Soviet economic aid and cooperation with the Mongolian People's Republic. Tsedenbal asks Mikoyan to forgive upcoming payments due and provide additional materials and Soviet workers for construction of railroads. Mikoyan tells Tsedenbal that the Soviets will help, but that Mongolia must prepare its own workforce and not be dependent on Soviet or Chinese help. The two also discuss trade issues and Chinese designs on Mongolia.

  • March 20, 1956

    Speech by Comrade Khrushchev at the 6th PUWP CC Plenum, Warsaw

    Speech by Comrade Khrushchev at the 6th PUWP CC Plenum, 20 March 1956, Warsaw explaining the changes since the death of Stalin and criticizing Stalin

  • September 04, 1958

    Anastas Mikoyan’s Recollections of his Trip to China

    Anastas Mikoyan gives a very detailed summary of his trip to China, to secretly hold talks with Mao Zedong. Begins with a summary of his trip, and choice of delegation members, and his living conditions while visiting with Mao. Describes talks with Mao, which covered a large range of topics, including Mao's divergence of opinion on American imperialism as compared to Stalin's, the CCP's lack of influence in China's cities, and Stalin's advice to arrest two Americans, including Sidney Rittenberg, who were "obvious American spies." Mao does not agree, eventually arrests spy suspects, and Mikoyan notes that after Stalin's death, USSR admitted to having no rationale or evidence for the spy allegations.

  • January 30, 1964

    Information Memorandum, 'About the Claims of the Chinese Leaders With Regard to the Mongolian People's Republic'

    Information note from First Secretary I. Kalabukhov of the Far Eastern Department of the CC CPSU on Chinese teritorial claims on the People's Republic of Mongolia. The note recounts the discussions between Chinese leaders Liu Shaoqi and Zhou Enlai with Com. A.I. Mikoyan on 7 April 1956.

  • 1994

    Excerpts from the Memoirs of Wladyslaw Gomulka Concerning the Polish Communist Leader's Meetings with Stalin in 1944-1945

    Gomulka describes the meeting of the KRN delegation with Stalin in 1944. He describes his personal meetings with Stalin in 1944-45, summarizing Stalin's views on agriculture, collectivization, Poland's international relations, and the communist Party in Poland.