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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • November 08, 1956

    Letter of the CC UCY to the CC CPSU with an exposition of the views of the leadership of the UCY on the events in Hungary

    In this letter, the Central Committee of Yugoslavia responds to the CC CPSU over questions concerning Yugoslavia’s decision to provide shelter to Nagy and his group at their embassy. The letter begins by expressing agreement on the weakness of Nagy’s government, the need to form a new government under Kadar, and the existence of “honest communists” in Nagy’s government that could assist Kadar. The letter relates that Yugoslavia cannot hand Nagy and his group over to authorities because of the domestic consequences of such an action. The correspondence ends with both the suggestion of amnesty for Nagy and Yugoslavia’s disavowal of any connection to Nagy or the uprising.

  • November 09, 1956

    Impressions of Radio Free Europe Hungarian Broadcasts

    Frank Wisner discusses impressions of RFE broadcasts with interlocutors in Vienna

  • November 09, 1956

    Radio Free Europe Encrypted Telex MUN 157, Richard Condon to W. J. Conerey Egan

    Richard Condon, Radio Free Europe (RFE) European Director reports on the border situation in late October and RFE staff who entered Hungary to report on the developing revolt there.

  • November 09, 1956

    Department of State, Incoming Telegram No. 1129

    US Ambassador to Moscow Charles Bohlen reports that he is sending a personal note to Foreign Affairs Minister Gromyko.

  • November 09, 1956

    Department of State, Incoming Telegram No. 1130

    Text of a personal note sent by Ambassador Bohlen to Foreign Affairs Minister Gromyko regarding an American citizen being detained in Hungary.

  • November 10, 1956

    Gazette of the State Council of the People's Republic of China, 1956, No. 40 (Overall Issue No. 66)

    This issue begins by denouncing British and French aggression against Egypt during the Suez Canal Crisis. It also includes a Chinese statement about the Soviet Declaration "to Strengthen Friendship and Cooperation [with] Other Socialist States," which acknowledges tensions between socialist countries and the need to address people's demands in Hungary and Poland. The next sections feature a message from Zhou Enlai to János Kádár, who would lead Hungary after the failed Revolution of 1956, and Sino-Nepali correspondence.

  • November 11, 1956

    Department of State, Incoming Telegram No. 1270

    The Embassy in Vienna reports that Radio Free Europe (RFE) staff recently detained in Hungary arrived safely in Austria.

  • November 12, 1956

    Radio Free Europe Encrypted Telex MUN 135, Richard Condon to W. J. Conerey Egan

    Richard Condon, Radio Free Europe (RFE) European Director reports the release of RFE staff from detention in Gyor, Hungary.

  • November 14, 1956

    US Government Appraisal of Radio Free Europe Broadcasts

    Cord Meyer forwards to Allen Dulles a State Department assessment dated November 13, 1956, of Radio Free Europe Hungarian and Polish broadcasts. The assessment was requested by Secretary of State John Foster Dulles and was prepared by State Department official L. Randolph Higgs, responsible for coordinating RFE issues with CIA, and Meyer, who objected to an initial State Department draft.

  • November 15, 1956

    CDS Report No. 24 from Choi Duk Shin to the President (Syngman Rhee)

    Choi Duk Shin offers his views on the crises in Hungary and the Middle East, urges President Rhee to organize immediate action against communist countries, and reports on Vietnamese domestic affairs including the recent typhoon and the continued Chinese minority debate.

  • November 16, 1956

    Proposed Interim Policy Guidance for Free Europe Committee, Draft

    The State Department approves with “comments and recommendations” a November 15, 1956, CIA/International Operations Division draft of revised guidelines for the Free Europe Committee (FEC) with handwritten revisions [presumably by a State official].

  • November 16, 1956

    Proposed Interim Policy Guidance for Free Europe Committee, Second Draft

    Second draft of “Proposed Interim Guidance for FEC” prepared for Allen Dulles to forward [over his disclosed pseudonym] to the FEC.

  • November 16, 1956

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Pakistan, 'A Comprehensive Report on Recent Circumstances in Pakistan'

    Chinese report on the impact of the Suez Canal Crisis on the Baghdad Pact and Pakistani foreign policy

  • November 17, 1956

    Gazette of the State Council of the People's Republic of China, 1956, No. 41 (Overall Issue No. 67)

    This issue commemorates the 90th birthday of Sun Yat-sen and continues to decry British and French aggression in Egypt. It also affirms Sino-Burmese relations after former Burmese Prime Minister U Nu visited China as Chairman of the Anti-Fascist People's Freedom League. Other sections cover the need for labor protection, establishing and expanding local people's committees, and problems with work assignments for university graduates.

  • November 19, 1956

    Draft Review of Radio Free Europe Hungarian Broadcasts

    Draft version of a CIA memorandum prepared for the White House on RFE broadcasts during the Hungarian Revolution.

  • November 19, 1956

    Review of Radio Free Europe Hungarian Broadcasts

    Final text of a CIA Memorandum submitted to the White House on RFE broadcasts during the Hungarian Revolution

  • November 20, 1956

    CIA Assessment of Radio Free Europe Hungarian Broadcasts

    CIA provides the White House with an early appraisal of RFE broadcasting to Hungary during the Revolution.

  • November 20, 1956

    News from Syria

  • November 21, 1956

    Letter No. 28 from the President (Syngman Rhee) to Minister Duk Shin Choi

    President Rhee praises South Vietnam's anti-communist exhibit and expresses his concern about the limitations of the Korean Armistice Agreement.

  • November 22, 1956

    Memorandum of Conversation with Bak Uiwan on 22 November 1956

    Discussion with Bak Uiwan, who notes that the KWP's atmosphere is still tense following the August Plenum. Uiwan claimed Kim Il Sung agreed with the suggestions of the Sino-Soviet delegation (Mikoyan and Dehuai) in order to avoid tension in the meeting, but had no intention of following through.