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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 04, 1960

    Note from the GPRA Secretary General to Foreign Missions and Delegations, ‘Our Foreign Policy’

    A memo from Algeria's Secretary General to its foreign missions and delegations, regarding Algeria's foreign policy. Explains, first, Algeria's current position in regard to the "socialist camp," noting recent positive signs of improvements in Algeria's relationships with China and the Soviet Union. Identifies apprehensions within the western bloc that Algeria may slide toward the socialist camp, and gives instructions on how to respond to and reduce these apprehensions, so as to more fully broaden Algeria's base of support in its struggle against France. The memo recognizes that the western bloc is still supporting France in its fight to keep Algeria as a colonial subject, and recommends issuing an ultimatum to these western countries; either they cease complicity with France or be considered fundamentally hostile to the Algerian cause.

  • March 01, 1961

    Report, Embassy of the Hungarian People’s Republic in the DPRK to the Foreign Ministry of Hungary

    Hungarian Ambassador Károly Práth reports on the changing position of the Korean Workers' Party between the Soviet Union and China.

  • March 19, 1961

    Annex #2 to 'Development of Relations with Socialist Countries since March 19, 1961'

    Report describing an upcoming Algerian governmental delegation visit to Beijing - with a planned stop in Moscow - as an opportunity for Algeria to seek support from Chinese and Soviet leaders in its struggle with France. Specifically mentions, among political goals, that the delegation should ask the Chinese and Russian governments to push for the governments of East Germany and Albania to officially recognize the GPRA.

  • August 15, 1961

    Telegram from the Enver Hoxha to Ho Chi Minh via Gac Mazi, the Albanian Ambassador to Moscow

    This is a telegram from the 1st Secretary of the Party of Labor of Albania Enver Hoxha to President Ho Chi Minh delivered via the Albanian Ambassador to Moscow Gac Mazi. This telegram discusses the possible visit of Ho Chi Minh to Tirana. Hoxha orders Mazi to contact Ho Chi Minh urgently and deliver a copy of the telegram to him. Enver Hoxha believes that the disputes between the various leaders of the socialist countries in Europe and the Party of Labor in Albania are serious and cannot be resolved simply or immediately. He assigns the blame for these disputes to the leaders of the other socialist countries. Hoxha asks Ho Chi Minh to talk to these leaders about these disputes before coming to Tirana. The reason for this is that other European communist leaders have begun denigrating the Party of Labor of Albania, the Albanian government, and the Albanian people. Hoxha writes that the Albanian leadership is still carefully analyzing the causes of the disputes. Lastly, he informs Ho Chi Minh that he will be ready to discuss the Tirana trip further in the second half of November of 1961.

  • October 24, 1962

    Cable from Japanese Embassy in Moscow to Tokyo

    A cable from the Foreign Minister Ohira to the Charges d'affaires ad interim Shigemitsu regarding the situation in Moscow over the Cuban blockade. The cable gives an overall report of the atmosphere in Moscow by describing the people and press gathered around the U.S. Embassy in Moscow.

  • October 27, 1962

    Cable from Soviet Foreign Minister Gromyko to USSR Ambassador to Cuba Alekseev

    A message from Gromyko to Alekseev to relay a message to Castro regarding American invasion.

  • November 02, 1962

    Cable from Japanese Embassy in Moscow to Tokyo

    Describes the domestic reaction in Moscow following the Cuban Blockade by the US. The cable discusses how the real sense of crisis had been widespread in society, and that after the crisis was over there was a sense of relief.

  • December 12, 1962

    Report of the Conversation by Carlos Rafael Rodrigeuez with Nikita Jruschov, with the Presence of Anastas Mikoyan on 11 December 1962

    Report form Carlos Rafael Rodriguez about his interview with Nikita Khrushchev in Moscow on 11 December 1962. "Dinner with Khrushchev" notes: Rodriguez writes about a dinner he attended with Mikoyan, Khrushchev, official delegates, and friends.

  • March 31, 1963

    From the Journal of A.I. Alekseyev, 'Record of a Conversation with Raul Castro Ruz, Minister of the Armed Forces of the Republic of Cuba, 27 February 1963'

    Raul Castro requests that Major [Sunyol] be given or sold an automobile while in Moscow.

  • April 03, 1963

    From the Journal of A.I. Alekseyev, 'Record of a Conversation with Raul Castro Ruz, Minister of the Armed Forces of the Republic of Cuba, 25 March 1963'

    Raul Castro reports on the OLO Leadership's decisions regarding Fidel's trip to Moscow.

  • June 03, 1963

    From the Journal of A.I. Alekseyev, 'Record of a Conversation with Raul Castro Ruz, Minister of the Armed Forces of the Republic of Cuba, 25 March 1963'

    Fidel Castro decides on dates for his visit to the Soviet Union, discusses publicity and a potential hunting trip with Khrushchev, and requests that the details of the trip remain secret.

  • September 24, 1963

    Report on Visit of the Society of Chinese-Soviet Friendship to the Soviet Union, T. Skvortsov-Tokarin

    Report on a tour group of Chinese citizens from the Society of Chinese-Soviet Friendship. The group visited Moscow, Tbilisi, Sochi, Kiev, Riga, and Leningrad. The Soviet guides were frustrated by the groups' argumentative behavior and attempts to speak directly to Soviet workers. The group was especially interested in finding out if Soviet listeners heard broadcasts of Radio Beijing.

  • September 11, 1964

    Letter from the Korean Workers Party Central Committee to the Central Committee of the CPSU

    The Socialist Unity Party of Germany reports on a critique by North Korea concerning the Soviet Union's effort to call a meeting of all socialist/communist countries. In the attached letter, North Korea expresses concern for a split between socialist countries.

  • November 11, 1964

    Cable from MAE to MD on USSR comments on MLF

    Note by ambassador to Moscow Straneo on comments by Soviet press regarding meetings between high-level US officials and new british Foreign Minister Patrick Gordon Walker on MLF.

  • March 20, 1965

    Minutes of Conversation between Cuban Defense Minister Raúl Castro and Polish Leader Władysław Gomułka, Warsaw, 20 March 1965

    During his visit in Poland, Castro relates Cuba's position on a conversation taken place in Moscow and why it may be of interest to the Cubans. Gomulka raises the issue of the missiles. In Gomulka's opinion two factors were decisive: contradictions which arose within the socialist camp and the policy which was conducted by Khrushchev. Gomulka is assured that US is capable of conducting a war with Cuba by way of conventional weapons, it does not have to use nuclear weapons. It is clear that the socialist camp and the USSR cannot defend Cuba in any other way but by using nuclear weapons. If a conflict is meant to be, then it will be a nuclear conflict, there is no other way. Gomulka further raises a question whether to go into a nuclear war or not. Castro disagrees with a manner nuclear weapons were withdrawn from Cuba by Soviets. Khruchshev explained that he did not have time. Per Gomulka, Khrushchev conducted a policy which was not thought-out and which was all-out. Gomulka further discusses his talks with Chinese and Vietnamese comrades re: nuclear weapons issue.

  • April, 1966

    Concerning the Instructions to the Soviet Representatives at the 64th Session of the International Olympic Committee

    Discussion of the upcoming vote for the location of the 1972 Olympic Games, including the possibility of Moscow bidding to host them.

  • April 04, 1966

    Central Council of the Union of USSR Sports Societies and Organizations Report on the 64th Session of the International Olympic Committee

    Instructions to request a delay in the vote for the 1972 Olympic Games in order to allow Moscow to submit a bid to host them.

  • April 09, 1966

    Record of Conversation between Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko and North Korean Foreign Minister Pak Seong-cheol

    Pak Seong-cheol claims that the American forces in South Korea are a hindrance in the way of reunification and comments on Soviet-North Korean relations and Japan.

  • December 01, 1966

    Excerpts from the Record of a Conversation between Podgornyy and Kim Byeong-jik

    The two diplomats discuss the Soviet-North Korean relationship and the diplomatic protocol involved in welcoming Kim Il Sung to Moscow.

  • January 11, 1967

    Cooperation between the Czechoslovak and Cuban Intelligence Services

    The report introduces Czechoslovak's assistance in the Operation MANUEL after the isolation of socialist Castro regime. Cuba looked for alternative routes in Europe in order to promote and influence the revolutionary movement in Latin America. Czechoslovakia assistance in the operation is of a strictly technical nature and its intelligence service is doing its utmost to protect the interests of the country by securing all technical matters. The report says that terminating the assistance was not possible for both practical and political reasons-- all direct flights between Czechoslovakia and Cuba would be suspended and a drastic cooling off of relations between two governments. Czechoslovak's refusal in assisting the operation would be interpreted as a political decision to suspend assistance to the national liberation movement in Latin America countries. However, the reports says that the assistance of Czechoslovak intelligence service to the operation is in no way amounts to agreeing with its political content and constitutes a minor aspect of intelligence work. The Soviet intelligence was also involved in organizing the operation in Moscow and offered assistance to its Cuban counterpart.