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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 30, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Vidaković speaks with Brazilian ambassador Luis Bastian Pinto on Brazil's role in the Cuban Missile Crisis negotiations and Fidel's argument for Cuban sovereignty and independence.

  • October 30, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Fidel Castro, after his first contacts with Brazilian President João Goulart’s special envoy Albino Silva, accepted well the Brazilian thesis which contains following: Denuclearization of the whole of Latin America and the embargo on atomic weapons delivery; Inspection by UN; Cuba would commit neither to export revolution nor to carry out any subversive activities; Cuba would be given guarantees for keeping its sovereignty and independence. The USA will accept the plan after negotiations. Russians “couldn’t think of anything better.”

  • October 30, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Vidakovic describes one of his (daily) meetings with Raul Roa. They discuss Cuban independence, U Thant and relations with Brazil.

  • October 31, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Mexico (Vlahov) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Yugoslav officials remark that significant publicity and acknowledgment was given to Tito’s message and initiative in regard to Brazilian President João Goulart’s messages, and Yugoslavia's activity in the UNO [United Nations Organization] has solidified their reputation as that of the nonaligned.

  • October 31, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    A telegram from the Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro to the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry expressing their pleasure with Tito’s message.

  • October 31, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    The Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro tells the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry about Brazil's proposal to the United Nations (denuclearization of Latin America, Cuba will not export revolutionary operations, Cuban guarantee of independence) and about how difficult it might be to implement the various aspects of this resolution. For example, when it comes to discussions of the evacuation of Guantanamo, Americans "stop their ears."

  • October 31, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    The Yugoslav Embassy in Havana and Ambassador Vidakovic tell the Foreign Ministry that Yugoslavia has been mentioned in Cuban press articles for their involvement in the Cuban Missile Crisis. He also discusses other popular headlines about the crisis situation.

  • October 31, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Representatives from Brazil and Yugoslavia discuss the Brazilian proposal to the United Nations (1) denuclearization of Latin America, 2) Cuba will not interfere politically with its neighbors, and 3) guaranteed sovereignty for Cuba), about various leader's opinions on the resolution and about the difficulty that might be involved in the implementation of these policies.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Foreign Ministry, Belgrade, to Yugoslav Embassies in Havana and Washington and the Yugoslav Mission to the United Nations, New York

    The Yugoslav Foreign Ministry relays to its embassies a summary of the Brazilian proposal on the Cuban Missile Crisis which, they say, mainly includes: the denuclearization of Latin America with inspections, Cuba's commitment to not "export" revolutionary operations, and guarantees to Cuba for sovereignty and independence. Allegedly, Castro welcomed the idea of the above plan. Brazil thinks that the USA could accept it after negotiations.

  • November 03, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Foreign Ministry to Yugoslav Embassies in Washington, Havana, Mexico, Caracas, and LaPaz, and Missions in Santiago de Chile, Montevideo, and New York City (United Nations)

    A message from the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry (originally, the embassy in Rio), saying that they are extremely satisfied with Tito’s message which contributed to Brazilian President João Goulart’s decisiveness on Cuban crisis.

  • November 08, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Vidakovic has a conversation with Mikoyan on the USSR's guarantees to the independence of Cuba and the negotiations talks.

  • November 08, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Yugoslav Foreign Minister Koca Popovic speaks with Ernesto “Che” Guevara about the Cuban Missile Crisis - the U.S. blockade, the fighting determination of the Cubans, the American imperium, and Latin American governments.

  • October 17, 1963

    Report on the conversation between Koca Popovic and Dean Rusk at the State Department.

    Memorandum of conversation between Yugoslav Foreign Minister Koca Popovic and Secretary of State Dean Rusk at the State Department. The discussion concentrates on US foreign policy - US-Soviet Relations, US policy toward West Germany, non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, force reduction in Europe, and the presence of Soviet forces in Cuba.

  • July 18, 1964

    Report on the relations of the SFRY – USA and the conclusions of the Federal Executive Council

    The document assembles the results of two meetings in July 1964 on the relations between the SFRY and the USA. The assessment of a stagnation in the relations at the meeting with the president of the Federal Executive Council on July 3, is followed by the resolution to intensify contacts and bilateral relations in order to maintain Yugoslavia's prestige among the socialist countries. The meeting on July 6, solidifies the plans. The sixteen recommendations resulting from it relate to mutual visits of government officials, the settlement of open economic negotiations, an intensified international engagement, and the stronger presence of Yugoslav decision makers in the US press.

  • May 30, 1967

    Minutes of Conversation between Yugoslav President Josip Borz Tito and UAR Ambassador Mohamed Handy Abuzeid, in Varga

    Minutes of conversation between Tito and UAR ambassador Mohamed Handy Abuzeid, discussing the situation in the Middle East. The ambassador states the UAR's goal is peace thought a diplomatic solution at the UN. They also discuss Yugoslavia's problems with Greece and how the Yugoslavs might improve relations with Albania. Yugoslavia and the UAR express their hope to improve economic ties and maintain their good relations.

  • May 30, 1967

    Report on the talks of Josif Tito with UAR Ambassador Abuzeid in Vanga

    Tito and Ambassador Abuzeid discuss events in Egypt and the Middle East.

  • August 11, 1967

    Notes on Yugoslav-Egyption Talks

    Summaries of talks between Tito and Nasser in Cairo and Alexandria, 11-18 August 1967.

  • September 05, 1967

    Report on the conversation between Marko Nikezic and Dean Rusk at the State Department.

    Memorandum of conversation between Yugoslav Foreign Minister Marko Nikezic and Secretary of State Dean Rusk at the State Department. The discussion is a continuation of earlier talks between U.S. president Lyndon B. Johnson and Yugoslav president Josef Tito. Rusk and Nikezic clarify the mutual positions of their countries on the crisis in the Middle East resulting from the recent Six-Day War. They also touch upon U.S.-Cuban relations, political developments in China, and tensions between the U.S. and the Soviet Union over plans for anti-missile systems.

  • July 11, 1968

    Minutes of Conversation between Yugoslav President Josip Broz Tito and UAR President Gamal Abdel Nasser in Brijuni, Croatia

    Minutes of conversation between Yugoslav President Josip Broz Tito and UAR President Gamal Abdel Nasser with occasional input from advisors. Nasser describes the situation in the Middle East, including Egypt's relations with the United States and fighting along the Suez Canal. The two leaders also discuss UN Special Envoy Gunnar Jarring's recent activities. Tito closes with a recount of his visit to Japan, Mongolia, Iran, and Moscow and an update of the Yugoslav economy.

  • April 13, 1970

    Report on Yugoslav-American relations fourteen months after President Richard Nixon's assumption of office.

    Report on Yugoslav-American relations written by a Yugoslav official representing the SFRY in Washington, D.C. Fourteen months after the beginning of President Richard Nixon's term in office the memorandum sums up general tendencies in U.S. politics in regard to Yugoslavia. Among the topics discussed are a general improvement of the relations in the economic, scientific, technical and cultural sectors as well as the SFRY's poltical position between the aligned countries.