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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 12, 1945

    TASS Digest, 'The Mexican Press about Byrnes' Statement; etc.'

    Excerpts from articles on James Byrnes, General Mark W. Clark, Clement Attlee, and US refusal to share technical information about the atomic bomb.

  • November 04, 1945

    From the Journal of V.M. Molotov, 'The Reception of the Czechoslovak Ambassador Horak, 4 November 1945 at 2200'

    In a meeting with Soviet Minister of Foreign Affairs V. M. Molotov, Czechoslovak Ambassador to the Soviet Union Jiri Horak requests that Stalin send greetings to the International Congress of Students to be held in Prague, expresses concerns about the implications of a joint Soviet-Czechoslovak company for developing uranium, and voices his hope that the Volhynia Czechs will be permitted to resettle in Czechoslovakia.

  • November 16, 1945

    TASS Report Distributed to Cdes. I.V. Stalin, V.M. Molotov, A.I. Mikoyan, L.P. Beria, G.M. Malenkov, V.N. Merkulo, A. Ya. Vyshinsky, and V.G. Dekanozov, 'Radio Broadcast'

    TASS reports on the first car to run on atomic energy, which drove through London on November 4, 1945.

  • November 28, 1945

    The Interrogation of Niels Bohr

    At the end of October 1945 two NDVD employees of the “S” Department for atomic intelligence activities were sent to Denmark to establish contact and speak with Niels Bohr. They managed to meet Bohr at his institute twice, on 14 and 16 November 1945, and obtained answers to 22 questions on constructing a nuclear reactor and the atomic bomb.

  • December, 1945

    Kurchatov’s Evaluation of Niels Bohr's Questioning

    Evaluation by the scientific director of the Soviet nuclear project, Igor Kurchatov, of the interview with Niels Bohr.

  • January 25, 1946

    Handwritten notes by Igor V. Kurchatov, Director of the Soviet Nuclear Program, on a Meeting with Stalin, Beria and Molotov

    Excerpts from Igor V. Kurchatov's handwritten notes from a conversation with Stalin on the secret Soviet nuclear project, accompanied by Beria and Foreign Minister V.M. Molotov, at the Kremlin on the evening of 25 January 1946.

  • January 25, 1946

    Notes on the discussion between I.V. Kurchatov, lead scientist for the Soviet nuclear effort, and Stalin

    Kurchatov's notes on his meeting with Stalin, Molotov and Beria. Stalin promises the all necessary help to the soviet effort to build an atomic bomb. He suggests that the project should be build on "a Russian scale," without concerns for cost saving.

  • April 02, 1946

    Protocol No. 18 of a Meeting of the Special Committee under the Council of Ministers of the USSR (Excerpt)

    Special dossier containing a resolution to send a Soviet geological prospecting party to survey North Korea for beryllium.

  • April 09, 1946

    Soviet Council of Ministers Resolution, Establishing Design Bureau No. 11

    Resolution establishing Design Bureau No.11 (KB-11), which was the Soviet analog of the secret wartime American nuclear weapons laboratory at Los Alamos, New Mexico.

  • May 13, 1946

    Decree of the USSR Council of Ministers, 'Questions of Reactive Weaponry'

    Council of Ministers decree on the formation of the postwar Soviet missile industry.

  • June 21, 1946

    Soviet Council of Ministers Resolution, No. 1286-525, On Development of Soviet Atomic Weapons

    Resolution outlining the work of the newly established Design Bureau No.11 (KB-11). Atomic bombs are referred to in the resolution as “jet engines S,” in two versions, S-1 and S-2 (abbreviated as RDS-1 and RDS-2). RDS-1 meant the analog of the first U.S. plutonium-239 implosion type atomic bomb tested on 16 July 1945 in New Mexico RDS-2 signified the analog of the uranium-235 gun type bomb exploded over Hiroshima on 6 August 1945.

  • September 29, 1946

    Letter from Igor V. Kurchatov to Lavrenti Beria requesting additional support for the project on buiding an atomic bomb.

    Igor Kurchatov, the scientific director of the Soviet nuclear project writes secret police chief Lavrenti Beria, whom Stalin had given principal responsibility for the atomic effort, asking for additional resources to solve uranium shortages faced by the project. (excerpts)

  • October 27, 1946

    Cable Nos. 97-98, Molotov to Druzhkov [Stalin]

    A cable discussing Molotov's intention to give a speech at the UN about veto powers, atom bombs, and arm reductions. He will offer a proposal from the Soviet delegation calling for universal arms reductions, a ban on the use of atomic energy for warlike aims, and efforts towards global peace and security.

  • November 07, 1946

    Cable No. 198, Molotov to Druzhkov [Stalin]

    A cable discussing the Soviet proposal for arms reduction and the American reaction to the proposal. Molotov proposes adding a fifth point to their original proposal: the creation, via the Security Council, of an institute for international control.

  • November 09, 1946

    Incoming Cable No. 2030, Druzhkov [Stalin] to Cde. Molotov

    A cable discussing nuclear arms control. Stalin agrees with Molotov on control of nuclear weapons and arms reductions, but believes they should be considered separately. He also believes arms reduction must encompass naval and aerial forces.

  • November 20, 1946

    Cable No. 641, Dekanozov to Cde. Stalin

    Dekanozov relates a conversation with Ambassador Smith, who indicated that President Truman was interested in control over nuclear energy. Smith would like to meet with Stalin when he returns from Sochi.

  • November 26, 1946

    Incoming Cable No. 2151, Druzhkov [Stalin] to Cde. Molotov

    Stalin agrees to Molotov's additional points on mutual arms reduction. Proposes creating under the UNSC a special inspection organ. To do this the following shall be created: control commissions on the fulfillment of the arms reduction agreement and militarized nuclear energy. The former should be temporary, the latter permanent, but they shouldn't highlight that the former is only temporary.

  • November 26, 1946

    Cable Nos. 423-424, Molotov to Druzhkov [Stalin]

    A letter from Molotov, discussing an additional point the Soviets plan to add to their proposal and seeking approval from Stalin. The point recommends a special commission within the Security Council for the purposes of both arms reduction and nuclear arms control.

  • November 26, 1946

    Cable Nos. 423-424, Molotov to Cde. Druzhkov [Stalin]

    A cable from Molotov, discussing an additional point the Soviets plan to add to their proposal and seeking approval from Stalin. The point recommends a special commission within the Security Council for the purposes of both arms reduction and nuclear arms control.

  • December 02, 1946

    Cable Nos. 509-511, Molotov to Druzhkov [Stalin]

    A copy of the draft resolution submitted by the United States to the UN, regarding arms reduction. Molotov thinks that this draft may be taken as a basis with the introduction of some changes he plans to report at a later time.