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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • May 31, 1962

    Summary of Ambassador Wang Binnan’s Report to the Department Party Committee

    Wang Bingnan reports extensively on social, political, religious, and economic conditions within Poland, as well as Poland's foreign relalations with the US, the Soviet Union, and China.

  • June 01, 1962

    Prague Embassy Views of Radio Free Europe

    In Dispatch No. 743, the Prague Embassy views RFE as “doing a job of good quality” but offers suggestions for improving the broadcasts

  • June 01, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak), 1 June 1962

    Drozniak replies to Ogrodzinski regarding the information he received from from [Charles E. “Chip”] Bohlen that Cuba has been removed from the list of priorities of US foreign policy. Bohlen also confirms, through Drozniak, that the content of the talks between [Secretary of State Dean] Rusk and [Soviet Ambassador Anatoly] Dobrynin. The Americans are assessing that the USSR is not currently in any hurry to resolve the issue of Berlin. When it comes to a next meeting [between the Americans and the Soviets], the US will wait for a Soviet initiative.

  • June 04, 1962

    Information about a Conversation between the Ambassador of the DPRK Comrade Gwon Yeong-tae and Comrade Alfred Kurella

    The North Korean Amabassador in East Germany evaluates politics, the economy, schooling, and the military in South Korea

  • June 07, 1962

    Warsaw Embassy Appraisal of Current Broadcasting to Poland by Radio Free Europe

    In Dispatch No. 466, the Warsaw Embassy views RFE as “doing an effective job” in broadcasting to Poland

  • June 25, 1962

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on Talk with Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos on 15 June 1962

    In a top secret report, Hungarian Ambassador to Cuba János Beck describes a recent meeting with Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos. Beck divides the conversation among five categories—agriculture, industry, central planning, counter-revolutionary activities, and the party. Dorticos reports improvements and obstacles (e.g. agricultural production is developing, though slowly, and the growth of the party remains in its initial stages of formation).

  • June 27, 1962

    TASS Correspondent in Mexico A. A. Pavlenko, Memorandum of Conversation with Alfredo Perera Mena

    Perera Mena, editor at a magazine published by the Mexican State National Bank for External Trade, discusses Mexico's economic dependence on the United States and possibilities for increasing trade with the Soviet Union.

  • July 01, 1962

    Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Presidium Protocol No. 39

    Protocol 39 gives some evidence that Khrushchev was thinking about more than just Cuba. Khrushchev discussed the importance of getting the US to stop flying over the ships heading to Cuba. After discussing the timetable for sending the missiles to Cuba, Khrushchev led his colleagues in a re-examination of the Soviet Union’s policy on West Berlin. Berlin had not been a topic of discussion for months.

  • July 06, 1962

    Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Presidium Protocol 40

    Malin provides notes from Issa Pliev, who would be named commander of Soviet forces in Cuba. They make reference to Kennedy's Independence Day speech, and draft a response, to the remarks made therein.

  • July 24, 1962

    Czechoslovak Embassy in La Paz to Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Economic Policy Report

    Czechoslovakia was beginning to appreciate the political impact of US aid programs under the Alliance for Progress. The 1962 Czechoslovak report goes on to explore the many conditions of US aid under Kennedy’s Alliance for Progress, which included "a complete break in commercial intercourse with Cuba and the commencement of a strong opposition strategy against the labor movement."

  • August 28, 1962

    Chinese Embassy Report, Burma’s Relations with the US

    The Chinese Embassy in Burma reports on Burma's economic relations with the United Stated.

  • August 28, 1962

    Conversation of Cde. N. S. Khrushchev and acting United Nations Secretary General U Thant, 28 August 1962

    Khrushchev and Thant discuss the possibility of a visit by Khrushchev to the UN General Assembly. Khrushchev says a visit is not likely until the Americans, French, British and Germans are ready to negotiate a solution to the Berlin question. Khrushchev outlines the Soviet position and says that the Soviet Union will sign a unilateral peace treaty with the GDR if their conditions are not met. He says that the SU would agree to UN intervention and to a multilateral peace treaty, which would avert international conflict and war. Khrushchev suggests that the UN headquarters be transferred to West Germany due to high costs and discrimination in New York. He identifies additional issues for discussion: the admittance of the People's Republic of China into the UN, the Taiwan-China issue, and disarmament. Thant and Khrushchev discuss the obstacles to resolution of the German question, including public opinion in America. They also discuss American dominance in the UN Secretariat, free trade, and the Common Market, among other topics.

  • September 01, 1962

    Telegram from Mexican Embassy, Havana

    A telegram from the Mexican Embassy in Cuba describing the incorrect facts that have been reported by the press lately, regarding commercial maritime traffic between Cuba and other socialist countries and counterrevolutionary forces.

  • September 02, 1962

    Note from Cuban Ambassador to Bulgaria, Salvador Garcia Aguero, to Bulgarian Foreign Minister, 2 September 1962

    Warning about the content of Castro’s declaration with regard to US threats against Cuba. Reference to the media and other authorities copies of the declaration.

  • September 04, 1962

    Research Memorandum RSB-152 from Roger Hilsman to the Secretary, 'Soviet Tactics in Talks on the Non-Diffusion of Nuclear Weapons'

    Before the words “nuclear nonproliferation” entered official discourse, the term “non-diffusion” (or “non-dissemination”) of nuclear weapons was used routinely. In part stemming from the negotiations over Berlin, during 1962-1963 the Kennedy administration held talks with allies and adversaries on the possibility of a non-diffusion agreement which included Germany. In light of a recent Soviet proposal, INR veteran Soviet expert Sonnenfeldt explained why Moscow had moved away from earlier proposals singling out West Germany and was focusing on the general applicability of a non-diffusion agreement.

  • September 14, 1962

    M. Zakharov and S. P. Ivanov to N.S. Khrushchev

    Zakharov and Ivanov report to Khrushchev the extent of US surveillance in Cuba and request extra fortifications for Soviet ships in Cuban waters.

  • September 25, 1962

    Report on meeting between the Mexican representative at the Organization of American States (OAS) and the Czechoslovak Ambassador in Washington about US-Cuban tensions over Guantanamo

    According to the Director General and the Czechoslovak Ambassador, the tensions between the U.S. and Cuba stem mostly from the violation of Cuban airspace by airplanes coming from Guantanamo and that the American airplanes had fired machine guns over Cuban territory. The Czechoslovakian Ambassador also reported that the Cuban troops were "in trenches."

  • September 29, 1962

    Italian Communist Journalist Carmine De Lepsis, Interview with Ernesto 'Che' Guevara, Havana

    In an interview with journalist Carmine De Lepsis, Che Guevara discusses the future development of the Cuban economy, the improvement in productivity and the establishment of new labor laws, dealing with the exodus of technicians, and in general part of the lower middle class, and compares the situation in Cuba to Latin America in general.

  • October 01, 1962

    Research Memorandum RFE-44 from Roger Hilsman to Acting Secretary, 'Japan’s Reaction to a Chinese Communist Nuclear Detonation'

    This “Limited Distribution” report on possible Japanese reactions did not anticipate that a test would cause basic changes in US-Japan security relations or in Tokyo’s general approach to nuclear weapons.

  • October 08, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Delegation at the 17th UN General Assembly

    Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos says in a meeting with Afonso Arinos de Mello-Franco that Cuba does not desire to be armed more than it has to for defense. They also discuss United States interference in Cuban affairs.