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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • July 23, 1987

    US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, Memorandum from Kenneth Adelman for the Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs, 'The Pakistani Procurement Cases'

    With Pakistan already violating the “red line” on uranium enrichment, Adelman believed that without a display of resolve “presidential credibility” would be further damaged; that required cutting off aid under the Solarz amendment.

  • July 24, 1987

    Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, Briefing Memorandum from Anthony Salvia to the Director, 'HFAC Asia Subcommittee Hearing on Pakistan'

    A hearing by the House subcommittee on International Economic Policy and Trade on 22 July 1987 made it clear why administration officials worried about the implications of the Pervez case. With Congressman Solarz arguing that the arrest involved “a flagrant and provocative challenge to US nonproliferation objectives.”

  • July 26, 1987

    Department of State, 'Classified Congressional Briefing on Pakistani Clandestine Nuclear-Related Procurement'

    These are the State Department’s talking points for use with Congress. While ACDA officials were fairly certain that a violation of the Solarz amendment had occurred, the State Department did not want to assume anything until it had reviewed the evidence.

  • July 28, 1987

    Department of State, Draft Telegram to Embassy Athens [et al.], 'Pakistani Circumvention of Nuclear Export Controls'

    This telegram included information that US embassies were to share with foreign governments to help them tighten up their export controls of steel tubes.

  • July 28, 1987

    US District Court, 'Indictment: US of America Vs. Arshad Pervez and Inam Ul-Haq'

    The indictment against Pervez and Ul-Haq included charges of conspiracy, bribery, racketeering, export violations, and false statements.

  • July 30, 1987

    Embassy Islamabad telegram 16052 to Department of State, 'Pervez Nuclear Arrest Case—July 23 Statement by MFA Spokesman Gives Greater Emphasis to Conspiracy'

    Only a few weeks after Pervez’s arrest, Under Secretary of State Armacost traveled to Pakistan for wide ranging discussions with General Zia, but with a special focus on nuclear procurement and the uranium enrichment program.

  • August, 1987

    Memorandum, Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Memo discussing India's nuclear ambitions and position in Asia, especially in relation to China and Pakistan.

  • August 03, 1987

    Embassy Islamabad Telegram 16294 to Department of State, 'First Day in Islamabad—August 2'

    Armacost reported to Secretary Shultz, “I emphasized the need for immediate practical steps to demonstrate to an aroused Congress and a skeptical administration that no further illegal procurement activities would take place and that we had verifiable assurances there would be no further enrichment of weapons-grade uranium.”

  • August 05, 1987

    Embassy Islamabad Telegram 16556 to Department of State, 'Under Secretary Armacost Meeting with Zia'

    Zia argued that Washington was trying to “get one Pakistani in order to hang the entire government.”

  • August 07, 1987

    Department of State Telegram 244270 to the Embassy in Islamabad, 'Under Secretary Armacost Meeting with Zia'

    Only a few weeks after Pervez’s arrest, Under Secretary of State Armacost traveled to Pakistan for wide ranging discussions with General Zia, but with a special focus on nuclear procurement and the uranium enrichment program.

  • August 10, 1987

    Arms Control And Disarmament Agency, Memorandum from Norman Wulf to the Director, 'Recent Activities Related to the Pakistani Procurement Case'

    Norman Wulf reviewed plans for a “dialogue” with Pakistan to prevent illegal procurement in the United States and verification of the five percent enrichment commitment.

  • August 13, 1987

    Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, Memorandum from Norman Wulf to the Director, 'Weekly Activities Report'

    Wulf reported to Adelman that the information telegram on the Pervez and other smuggling cases had gone out to the embassies (except for Soviet bloc) and had received a favorable response from nuclear-supplier states.

  • August 23, 1987

    Embassy Islamabad Telegram 17754 to the Secretary of State, 'Pervez Case-GOP Regulation on Procurement Activities'

    During the Armacost-Zia talks, the Pakistanis tell US officials that they will confidentially share any new procurement regulations with them.

  • August 29, 1987

    Department of State Telegram 270161 to Embassy Ottawa, 'Access to Canadian Documents in Pervez Case'

    The Canadian government cooperated with the US Justice Department in the Pervez case by seizing documents at his and making them available to federal prosecutors. The State Department wanted permission to review the documents “on the premises of the U.S. law enforcement authorities.”

  • September 02, 1987

    Consulate Lahore Telegram 0524 to Embassy Islamabad, Information Department of State, 'Pervez Nuclear Arrest Case—Possible Location of Brig. Inam Ul Haq'

    A confidential source told consular officials that the Pakistani government had detained Inam Ul Haq and was “being rotated between various locations” in Pakistan-controlled Kashmir.

  • September 04, 1987

    Ted Borek to Mr. Peck et al, 'Draft Note to Canadians on Pervez Documents'

    The Canadian government cooperated with the US Justice Department in the Pervez case by seizing documents at his and making them available to federal prosecutors. The State Department wanted permission to review the documents “on the premises of the U.S. law enforcement authorities.”

  • September 05, 1987

    State Department Telegram 278631 to US Embassy Ottawa, 'Access to Canadian Documents In Pervez Case'

    The Canadian government cooperated with the US Justice Department in the Pervez case by seizing documents at his and making them available to federal prosecutors. The State Department wanted permission to review the documents “on the premises of the U.S. law enforcement authorities.”

  • November, 1987

    United States v. Arshad Pervez, Criminal Number 87-00283, Exhibit List

    The exhibits included Pervez’s notebooks with such incriminating language as “atom” and “military.”

  • November, 1987

    United States v. Arshad Pervez, Criminal Number 87-00283, Exhibits 38-38 through 38-85

    The exhibits included Pervez’s notebooks with such incriminating language as “atom” and “military.”

  • November, 1987

    United States v. Arshad Pervez, Criminal Number 87-00283, Exhibits 38-86 through 52

    The exhibits included Pervez’s notebooks with such incriminating language as “atom” and “military.”