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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • January 24, 1964

    From the Diary of A. S. Anikin, Record of a Conversation with the Ambassador of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic to Cuba, Cde. Pavlicek, 4 January 1964

    Pavlicek reports that Chinese representatives in Cuba have launched an anti-Soviet propaganda campaign, aimed towards all levels of the Cuban population. He mentions that many Cubans in favor of Chinese propaganda activity have expressed the opinion that China will support Cuban revolutionary activity in Latin America.

  • March 03, 1964

    Conversations between Delegations of the Romanian Workers Party and the Chinese Communist Party in Beijing, 3-10 March 1964 (excerpts)

    Ion Gheorghe Maurer and Nicolae Ceauşescu of Romania meet with Liu Shaoq, Deng Xiaoping, and other Chinese Communist officials. The Romanians discuss the Sino-Soviet Split, the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance, and the organizing structure of the Warsaw Pact. Maurer expresses frustration with the Soviet Union, referencing the Cuban Missile Crisis and similar "circumstances in which decisions were taken unilaterally, expressing only the Soviet point of view."

  • May 04, 1964

    Information Note from the Foreign Information Section of the ''Securitate'' with regard to the different opinions made public on Radio Free Europe concerning "The Policy of Independence of Romania."

    A description of correspondence between the Paris and Munich bureaux of Radio Free Europe (RFE) on whether or not Romanian political and economic policies constituted a signal that Romania was asserting its independence from the USSR

  • September 27, 1964

    Note on the Conversation between the Romanian Party and Government Delegation led by Ion Gheorghe Maurer and Soviet Leader Nikita Khrushchev

    Note reporting on negative comments made by Khrushchev about Mao Zedong.

  • September 27, 1964

    Memorandum of Conversation between the Romanian Party and Government Delegation Led by Ion Gheorghe Maurer and Soviet Leader Nikita Khrushchev

    Representatives from Romania and the Soviet Union discuss the current industrial and economic situation, as well as foreign relations with China.

  • November 12, 1964

    Remarks by the East German Embassy in Hanoi on the Article in Hoc Tap No. 11/1964 [Excerpts]

    The GDR's Hanoi Embassy remarks on an anti-Soviet article in the North Vietnam paper. The Soviet opinion is that there a change in Vietnam's attitude toward the Soviet Union

  • February 10, 1965

    Record of Conversation between the Chinese Ambassador to the Soviet Union Pan Zili and the Korean Ambassador to the Soviet Union Ambassador Kim Byeong-jik

    Chinese Ambassador to the Soviet Union and North Korean Ambassador to the Soviet Union discussed about the foreign policies of the new Soviet leadership under Khrushchev. They exchanged views on international communist movement, as well as the Soviet Union's perceptions on the roles of the United Nations in international affairs.

  • February 24, 1965

    Information No. 098 by the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Central Committee to the Socialist Unity Party Central Committee [Excerpts]

    A description of Sino-Soviet and Soviet-Vietnamese relations; specifically how the Soviet Union desires to normalize its relations with China, and an optimism that relations with Vietnam will continue to grow. It is also suggested that the Chinese are not doing enough to support the Communists in Vietnam.

  • March 03, 1965

    Bulgarian Embassy, Havana (Kulbov), Information Regarding The Latin American Communist Parties’ Conference

    First Secretary of the Bulgarian Embassy to Cuba A. Hubenov describes a Latin American communist party conference held in Havana, November 1964. The parties secretly discussed their struggle against imperialism and the expansion of communist revolutions in Latin America and Cuba's assistance to that struggle. Conference deliberations included a discussion of the Sino-Soviet split and the fear of factions within the communist movement.

  • April 25, 1965

    Note by the East German Embassy in Hanoi on a Conversation with Ambassadors of the Other Socialist States in the Soviet Embassy on 2 April 1965

    During the conversation, it is said that the United States is increasing its attacks and overall involvement in the Vietnam conflict. Additionally, Soviet Ambassador Shcherbakov tells Pham Van Dong how the Chinese continue to evade giving aid to Vietnam because they fear attack from the Americans.

  • May 12, 1965

    Note by the East German Embassy in Hanoi on a Joint Conversation with the Ambassadors from other Socialist Countries in the Hungarian Embassy on 4 May 1965

    Soviet Ambassador Ilya Shcherbakov informs a meeting of Socialist Ambassadors of Soviet-Vietnamese talks in Moscow. He notes that the United States realizes it does not have the international support for Vietnam that it had expected, and that the Soviet Union will continue to support Vietnam in the struggle. He argues that there is still much anti-Soviet propaganda in Vietnam, which comes from the Chinese, and points out three positions of the Chinese that he does not understand.

  • June 03, 1965

    Note by the East German Embassy in Hanoi on a Conversation of Comrade Jarck with the Attache of the Czechoslovak Embassy, Comrade Freybort, on 2 June 1965, from 10:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., in the East German Embassy [Excerpts]

    Conversation at the East German Embassy in Hanoi, where a Comrade Freybort speaks of the difficulties involved with organizing trilateral talks between the China, Vietnam, and the USSR. It is also mentioned that China criticized Vietnam for building diplomatic relations with the USSR, which China sees as an alliance with modern revisionists.

  • June 08, 1965

    Oral Statement by the Head of the Department for the USSR and for the Countries of Eastern Europe of MFA PRC, Yu Zhan, Transmitted to the Embassy on 8 June 1965

    A Chinese response to a statement from the Soviet Union, arguing that the Soviets look only to extend their influence over Vietnam, and not to truly help it to defeat the United States. It points out several examples of Soviet aid to Vietnam, which China believes had ulterior motives.

  • June 11, 1965

    Introductory Visit of the Soviet Ambassador to North Korea, Comrade Gorchakov, on 10 June 1965

    East German Ambassador Brie reports about relations between North Korea and the Soviet Union regarding economic affairs and relations between North Korea and China. He also discusses relations between East Germany and North Korea, and gives a description of disputes between the East German and Chinese Ambassador.

  • July 09, 1965

    Note on a Conversation with an Unnamed Representative of the International Department of the CPSU CC on the Situation in Vietnam [Excerpts]

    An unnamed Soviet official explains that Chinese officers and advisors in Vietnam are discouraging the use of Soviet weapons, despite the fact that they are the most modern and effective.

  • July 12, 1965

    Changes in the Leadership of the Korean Workers Party and the Government of North Korea

    Report about the improvement of North Korean relations with East Germany and the Soviet Union. A slight pejoration of North Korean-Chinese relations is also marked.

  • December 11, 1965

    Note by East German Ambassador on the Current Policy of the Chinese Leadership [Excerpts]

    A note on the conversations between Ho Chi Minh and Mao Zedong in Beijing. Mao stressed the importance of Vietnamese opposition to Soviet revisionism. He also argues that a larger percentage of Chinese aid should be spread amongst the Southeast Asia region, and not simply given to Vietnam.

  • January 27, 1966

    Note on Two Conversations with the Minister Counselor of the North Vietnamese Embassy, Comrade Hoan Muoi, on 26 January 1966, in the Cuban Embassy, and on 27 January 1966, on the Occasion of a Farewell Visit to Our Embassy [Excerpts]

    Minister Counselor of the DRV Embassy Hoan Muoi expresses his belief that there will be no international conference on Vietnam until there is a reconciliation between the USSR and China. He asserts that Kruschev damaged the world Communist movement, but also that China's objections to Soviet aid to Vietnam are unjustified.

  • March 08, 1966

    Letter from East German Foreign Minister Otto Winzer to [Politburo Members] Comrade Walter Ulbricht, Comrade Willi Stoph, Comrade Erich Honecker, and Comrade Hermann Axen[Excerpts]

    Letter from East German Foreign Minister to members of the SED Politburo which contains parts of a report by a Soviet delegation headed by Ambassador Shcherbakov. The Vietnamese situation is discussed, and it is asserted that Vietnamese officials are to quick to listen to Chinese advisors. It is also noted that, while the American morale is decreasing, it will still be most difficult to bring about the second "Dien Bien Phu" they are looking for.

  • March 31, 1966

    Embassy, Havana, Report on the State of the Cuban Communist Party

    In a report on the Cuban Communist Party, Bulgarian Embassy counselor S. Cohen discusses strengths and concerns with the Cuban goverment. The Cuban revolutionary movement debunked the theory of geographically determined fatalism, but also displays a strong dependence on the Latin American liberation movement (e.g. Jose Mari, Simon Bolivar) for inspiration instead of socialist principles. Cohen reports negative developments including the Cuban government’s growing ambition to rule the Third World revolutionary movement and strong belief in the Cuban armed struggle as a template for all national liberation movements. The Cuban delegation strongly endorsed armed struggle as the only means of socialist advancement at the Tricontinental Conference recently held in Havana. Bulgaria must remain close with the Cuban government to help it develop economically and mature politically.