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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • November 12, 1969

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in the Soviet Union to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    The Hungarian Ambassador in the DPRK discusses with Soviet officials Soviet-DPRK relations and Korea's stance on the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

  • March 03, 1975

    US National Security Council Memorandum, ROK Weapons Plans

    American officials in Washington, D.C., conclude that South Korea is in the initial stages of developing a nuclear weapons program.

  • July 11, 1975

    Draft US Department of State Cable on Approach to South Korea on French Reprocessing Plant

    A follow up report for Henry Kissinger on the state of U.S. policy toward South Korea's purchase of a French reprocessing plant.

  • July 30, 1975

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Hungarian report on Sino-Korean relations. China is wary of a second Korean War, whereas Kim Il Sung makes it clear that military force is an option. Military technology and equipment were also made available to Kim Il Sung on his foreign relations tour.

  • August 26, 1975

    Memorandum, Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Memorandum from the Hungarian Foreign Ministry, regarding the coordination of the socialist states prior to an IAEA meeting. The Soviet Union intends to make the IAEA safeguard system more effective.

  • February 16, 1976

    Memorandum, Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Korean Officials meet with the Hungarian Foreign Ministry. The North Koreans believe Korea can not be reunited peacefully, and that the DPRK is prepared for a nuclear war.

  • February 18, 1976

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    A member of the Polish Embassy reports information on DPRK military expenditures, manpower, and desire to construct a nuclear reactor.

  • April 15, 1976

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Report on Soviet-Korean economic negotiations. The DPRK makes a request for a nuclear power plant, which the Soviet Union declines. The Korean delegation is overly aggressive and crude to the Soviets.

  • June 25, 1976

    Telegram, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Soviet-Korean relations deteriorate, as Korea falls behind in commercial deliveries and the Soviet Union declines to deliver a nuclear power plant.

  • August 09, 1976

    Memorandum, Branch Office of the Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Trade in Pyongyang to the Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Trade

    Memorandum from 1976 Intergovernmental Consultative Commission, in which Korea's inability to maintain levels of trade in raw materials has negatively affected Soviet production. North Korea again asks for a nuclear power plant.

  • August 31, 1976

    Memorandum, Hungarian National Commission of Atomic Energy to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    The DPRK Delegation to the IAEA expresses concern to the Hungarian Embassy about plans to build a regional reprocessing plant in South Korea and urges it to be moved to the Philippines.

  • December 08, 1976

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    The DPRK requests economic aid and technology from the Soviet Union. The Soviets repeatedly ignore or refuse the requests.

  • January 20, 1977

    Telegram, Embassy of Hungary in the Soviet Union to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    North Korea intends to not fulfill trade obligations with the Soviet Union in order to fix the increasing economic problems. North Korea again asks for a nuclear power plant, as means of increasing prestige.

  • February 16, 1977

    Memorandum, Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    The DPRK reaches out to other socialist nations to gain support for its 4-point proposals. They include references to the DPRK developing nuclear power and the possibility of nuclear war on the Korean peninsula.

  • March 03, 1977

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in Belgium to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    The socialist countries at The World Conference for the Peaceful Reunification of Korea draft a resolution that demands withdrawal of American troops from South Korea, as well as cessation of other states providing South Korea with defense capabilities.

  • May 18, 1977

    Telegram, Embassy of Hungary in the Soviet Union to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Soviet-DPRK economic relations make slow progress. The North Koreans continue to ask for a nuclear power plant, which the Soviets will not supply. Kim Il Sung is to make an official visit to Moscow.

  • November 03, 1977

    Report, Permanent Mission of Hungary to the International Organizations in Vienna to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    The DPRK's representation to Austria and Czechoslovakia is under-staffed and has little knowledge of international organizations. They are further impeded by language barriers. Hungary encourages an upgrade in representation.

  • November 21, 1977

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Soviet-DPRK delegations meet, but agree to not discuss North Korea's economic problems repaying the Soviet Union, or the Soviet Union's refusal to supply a nuclear power plant to North Korea.

  • August 30, 1978

    Report, Hungarian National Atomic Energy Commission to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    The socialist countries coordinate their delegations before an IAEA Conference. The Cuba delegation states it can not afford to sign the NPT, citing American presence in Guantanamo.

  • February 17, 1979

    Telegram, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    The DPRK asks Czechoslvakia to construct a nuclear power plant, and also for uranium-mining equipment.