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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 25, 1981

    Memorandum from John Stein to the Secretaries of State and Defense and Director of the National Security Agency, '[Redacted] Report'

    Translation about a meeting of the National Defense Committee where they discuss several ways to implement martial law, and consider asking for assistance from the USSR or other Warsaw Pact states.

  • December 15, 1981

    Intelligence Information Cable, 'Background to the Polish Imposition of Martial Law'

    Report comes after the declaration of martial law, and takes intelligence from a former Polish General Staff Officer to illuminate some of the details that went into the planning of martial law.

  • December 18, 1981

    Intelligence Information Cable, 'Soviet Influence Among the Current Polish Leadership and Composition of the Council of National Salvation'

    Report elaborates on how the imposition of martial law makes the Polish government more reliant on Soviet authorities.

  • December 21, 1981

    Central Intelligence Agency, 'Background to Present Situation in Poland and Possible Soviet Role'

    Report outlines the various factors leading up to martial law, including Soviet influence, possible Warsaw Pact intervention, and possible public backlash.

  • January 27, 1982

    Intelligence Information Cable, 'Soviet Pressure on Polish Leaders to Impose Martial Law'

    Report details interactions between Polish and Soviet military officials, including angry phone calls between Gen. Jaruzelski and Brezhnev.

  • January 29, 1982

    Intelligence Information Cable, 'Relationship between the Polish Ministry of National Defense and the Ministry of Internal Affairs'

    Cable includes information on the acceptance of KGB advisors, military appointments, and resistance to Soviet penetration.

  • May 13, 1982

    Intelligence Information Cable, 'Relationship between Soviet Military Representation to Poland and the Polish General Staff'

    Report explains the previously waning influence of Soviet officers on the Polish military, discussing their housing, decreasing size and role in the Polish armed forces.

  • June 24, 1984

    Memorandum from Max Hugel to the Secretaries of State and Defense and Director of the National Security Agency, 'Attitudes of the Polish Ministry of Defense and Soviet Military Positions in Connection with the Current Political Situation in Poland'

    Report discusses conflicting reports from the Polish and Soviet governments on the stationing of troops in Poland.

  • April 14, 1988

    Lecture by Sergei Akhromeyev, 'The Current State of Soviet Military Doctrine'

    This is a transcript of a lecture delivered by Sergei Akhromeyev, the Chief of the General Staff of the Soviet Armed Forces, to the Polish General Staff about Soviet military doctrine in early 1988. The document defines what the Soviets meant by military doctrine, differentiating between the doctrine of the Soviet Union and the Warsaw Pact by stressing the former’s wider range objectives, especially concerning the use of strategic nuclear weapons. In addition, it identifies contemporary issues facing Soviet doctrine and analyzes topics such as nuclear non-proliferation, reduction of nuclear stockpiles and refutes the idea that nuclear weapons should be used in a counter-offensive operation. It stresses the importance of defense, negating offensive military preparedness in lieu of purely defensive Warsaw Pact capabilities (albeit altogether sufficient to successfully deter a NATO attack from the West). It also discusses the results of the March 2-3 1988 NATO talks and concludes that the West is not willing to stop the arms race and is increasing its offensive capabilities. The Warsaw Pact’s response should include increased military research, better vigilance to capture signals of a possible attack and more tactical and technical training for the military command. It asserts that even though a war is less likely than in the past, quoting Gorbachev, “the nature of capitalism itself can be the cause of war.”