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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • April 29, 1954

    Agreement between the Republic of India and the People's Republic of China on Trade and Intercourse between the Tibet Region of China and India

    China and India put forth the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence, which call for mutual respect for each other's territorial integrity and sovereignty, mutual non-aggression, mutual non-interference in each other's internal affairs, equality and mutual benefit, and peaceful co-existence.

  • June 28, 1954

    Record of the First Meeting between Premier Zhou and Prime Minister U Nu

    Zhou Enlai and U Nu first talked about the decision made on the Geneva Conference regarding the armistice in the Korean Peninsula and the role of the US in it. Then they talked about the elements that complicated the Sino-Burmese relations and the need for building mutual trust and signing a non-political agreement. They also discussed the principles they would have in a joint statement before the signing of this potential agreement.

  • October 22, 1954

    Key Points of the Conversation between Song Qingling and Nehru

    Indian Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru and Song Qingling, former Chinese nationalist and second wife of Sun Yat-Sen, discuss Taiwan, Australia's position on China's entrance to the United Nations, and the impact of governmental censorship on Chinese foreign policy.

  • 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'List of Problems Between China and Other Asian-African Countries'

    A list of problems between China and other Asian-African countries

  • 1955

    Report by the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Some Existing Issues in and Suggestions for the Asia-Africa Conference'

    A Chinese Foreign Ministry report on three sets of issues facing the Asian-African Conference.

  • January 17, 1955

    Plan (Draft) for Compilation, Translation and Publication in Cooperation for the Propaganda in the Asian-African Conference

    A list of books and pamphlets to be distributed by China at the Asian-African for the purpose of propaganda. The topics concerned include: Nationality, Religion in China, China in general, Taiwan, and China's Five Principles

  • January 28, 1955

    Mao Zedong, 'The Chinese People Cannot Be Cowed by the Atom Bomb'

    Mao Zedong spoke to the Finnish Ambassador Carl-Johan Sundstrom on the history of Chinese wars with European powers and states that China and Finland have had friendly relations. He then addressed the possibility of the U.S. waging an atomic war over Taiwan and how Chinese would respond. Finally, Mao foreshadowed the downfall of U.S. and British ruling classes to the end of tsarist Russia and Chiang Kai-shek should the United States enter another world war.

  • March 27, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Compilation of the Excerpts of the Telegrams Concerning the Asian-African Conference'

    The collection of telegrams covers the procedure and agenda about the Asian-African Conference, the arguments about China’s participation in the Conference, the attempts of the US and the UK to influence the Conference, and the attitudes of various countries toward the Conference.

  • April 01, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'The Asian-African Conference'

    The note covers the background, achievements, and influence of the Asian-African Conference. It states that the Conference was initiated because Asian and African countries gained their independence after the Second World War and wanted to tackle the imperialism and colonialism. After the Conference, there was an increase of anti-imperialism sentiment among the Asian and African countries.

  • April 19, 1955

    Supplementary Speech of Premier Zhou Enlai at the Plenary Session of the Asian African-Conference

    Zhou Enlai claimed that although the PRC believed communism was positive, they did not come to the conference for the purpose of propaganda and wished to seek communality instead, otherwise they could have mentioned the Taiwan issue and the treatment of the PRC at the UN. He went on to stress that ideological and religious difference should not prevent countries from agreeing on fundamental points. Zhou also discussed China's opposition to interference in other countries' affairs.

  • April 19, 1955

    Main Speech by Premier Zhou Enlai, Head of the Delegation of the People's Republic of China, Distributed at the Plenary Session of the Asian-African Conference

    Zhou Enlai calls for increased cooperation between the countries of Asia and Africa at the Bandung Conference.

  • April 24, 1955

    Speech by Premier Zhou Enlai at the Closing Session of the Asian-African Conference

    Premier Zhou praises the delegates at the Bandung Conference for their work in opposing colonialism, safeguarding world peace, and promoting friendly cooperation among African and Asian countries, while beseeching them to join China in working towards the peaceful unification of Korea and eliminating the tension in the Taiwan area.

  • July 12, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Draft Proposal to Strengthen and Develop Friendly Relations with Asian-African Countries after the Asian-African Conference'

    The PRC Foreign Ministry proposes to develop relations with, strengthen propaganda work toward, and expand the study of countries in Asia and Afica.

  • October 19, 1956

    Briefing on the Visit to China of Pakistani Prime Minister Suhrawardy (No. 3)

    The premiers of Pakistan and China convene to discuss Taiwan, Pakistani-Chinese relations, Mao's leadership, and the Muslim population in China, among other issues.

  • May 12, 1957

    Brief Summary of Conversation between Comrade Mao Zedong and the Delegation of the People’s Assembly of the People’s Republic of Albania

    Comrade Mao mentioned that the communism belief closely united western and eastern countries in the socialist camp, and the Asian, African and Arab states are our allies in the war against imperialism. Comrade Rita answered Mao's questions about Albania's domestic situation, such as religion and domestic consumptions. Mao also depicted Chinese ancient tale the Monkey King to Rita, explaining the revolution situation in China.

  • November 09, 1957

    Addition to Memorandum of Conversation between Czechoslovak Parliamentary Delegation and Mao Zedong, 29 September 1957

    The Head of the Czechoslovak delegation and Mao Zedong agree that relations between the CSSR, PRC, and USSR are politically strong but require economic improvement, according to Khrushchev. Mao discusses the socialist revolution and its varying levels of support in China amongst the different demographics within the Chinese social structure. Mao also discusses the three basic goals which guide Chinese foreign policy.

  • November 18, 1957

    Mao Zedong, 'Speech at a Meeting of the Representatives of Sixty-four Communist and Workers' Parties' (Edited by Mao)

    During a speech at the Moscow Meeting of Communist and Workers' Parties of 1957 , Mao Zedong proclaims that "the east wind prevailing over the west wind." This version of the speech was edited by Mao for publication.

  • July 01, 1960

    Zhang Zhiziang, 'Lessons Learned from Ten Years of Foreign Cultural Work, Future Tasks and Guidelines'

    Zhang Zhixiang of China's Committee for Foreign Cultural Relations outlines the achievements and failures of the PRC's cultural diplomacy since 1949, and gives some suggestion for future approaches.

  • July 17, 1961

    Memorandum of Three Conversations Between Director Zhang Wenji and the Indian Ambassador Regarding Sino-Indian Border Issues and the Two Countries’ Relations

    Three conversations between Zhang Wenji and Indian ambassador Parthasarathy, addressing the future of Sino-Indian relations, the Sino-Indian border issue, and India's policies toward Bhutan, Sikkim, and Pakistan.

  • September 05, 1962

    Pakistani Ambassador Raza Pays Formal Visit to Chinese Premier Zhou

    Zhou Enlai and Pakistani Ambassador Raza discuss Chinese and Pakistani relations with India, especially Indian Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru's positions on Kashmir, Sino-Indian border disputes, and Sino-Indian interactions on Taiwan and Tibet.