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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • May 29, 1952

    State Department Comments on Radio Liberty Policy Guidance Paper

    State Department Russia expert Francis B. Stevens comments on a draft policy guidance for Radio Liberty broadcasts. [Evidently an initial response to "Office of Policy Coordination Requests State Department Views on Radio Liberty", which is dated June 2 but was drafted on May 26.]

  • June 02, 1952

    Office of Policy Coordination Requests State Department Views on Radio Liberty

    Frank Wisner in a memorandum to Robert Joyce requests State Department views on policy guidance for Radio Liberty broadcasts, to be organized by the Russian émigré Political Center and adhering to a list of 21 prescriptions and prohibitions.

  • June 09, 1952

    State Department and Office of Policy Coordination Discussion of Radio Liberty

    State Department and Office of Policy Coordination officials discuss differences among émigré groups and hostility of the exile Ukrainian Congress to the American Committee for Liberation.

  • January 22, 1953

    Radio Liberty Editorial Policies Defined

    A CIA memorandum formulates guidelines for RL broadcasts to be conducted by a Coordinating Center of Soviet exiles

  • May 18, 1953

    CIA Criticizes American Committee for Liberation Policies

    Dana Durand, chief of the CIA/DDP SR Division, now responsible for the Radio Liberty project, concludes that efforts to unify the Russian emigration have become counterproductive, that RL broadcasting should be separated from émigré politics, and that AMCOMLIB president Leslie Stevens is too wedded to the old approach to continue in office.

  • July 24, 1953

    Radio Liberty Broadcasting Reviewed

    State Department, CIA, and American Committee for Liberation (AMCOMLIB) representatives review Radio Liberty issues. CIA notes RL’s “steady progress” without participation of the émigré Political Center.

  • September 30, 1953

    Implementation of Jackson Committee Recommendations on Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty

    The Operations Coordinating Board forwards CIA’s acceptance of Jackson Committee recommendations that the Free Europe Committee and American Committee for Liberation concentrate on radio broadcasting to the Soviet bloc as distinct from émigré support projects.

  • February 26, 1954

    CIA Review of Radio Liberty Broadcasting

    A CIA memorandum reviews Radio Liberty policy guidance to date and outlines how it differs from the Voice of America.

  • April 12, 1954

    CIA Criticism of American Committee for Liberation Mission Statement

    CIA official Thomas Braden, now responsible for Radio Liberty, criticizes American Committee for Liberation (AMCOMLIB) president Stevens’ enclosed mission statement as overemphasizing émigré politics and neglecting communication with the people of the Soviet Union.

  • April 21, 1954

    Revised American Committee for Liberation Mission Statement

    A revised AMCOMLIB Mission Statement reflects Thomas Braden’s critique in his April 12, 1954 memorandum ["CIA Criticism of American Committee for Liberation Mission Statement"]

  • July 30, 1954

    American Committee for Liberation's Mission Redefined

    CIA official Thomas Braden restates American Committee for Liberation's redefined mission which puts American staff and not exile leaders in charge of exile broadcasters.

  • September 01, 1955

    Radio Liberty's Effectiveness Appraised

    Stanford University communications expert Wilbur Schramm reviews the effectiveness of Radio Liberty after two and a half years of broadcasting.

  • March 13, 1956

    German Concerns about Free Europe Committee Balloon Leaflet Operations

    West German Ambassador Heinz Krekeler shares his government’s concerns about Free Europe Committee (FEC) balloon operations with Deputy Undersecretary of State Robert Murphy and FEC President Whitney Shepardson.

  • July 03, 1956

    National Security Council, NSC 5608, Draft of “US Policy toward the Soviet Satellites in Eastern Europe”

    Staff draft of NSC 5608, concluding that ferment in the Communist world provides new opportunities to challenge Soviet control. A draft annex called for “encouraging evolutionary change” and defined as tasks of RFE and RL (and other USG-funded media) “avoiding any incitement to premature revolt” while “seeking to maintain faith in the eventual restoration of freedom.” Redacted document 76, FRUS, 1955-1957, XXV, unredacted document 12, Csaba Békés, Malcolm Byrne, and János M. Rainer, The 1956 Hungarian Revolution: A History in Documents (Budapest: Central European University Press, 2002.)

  • September 19, 1956

    Czechoslovak Politburo Resolution on Plan to 'Counter the Czechoslovak Reactionary Exiles'

    This Czechoslovak Politburo Resolution of 1956 approved an Interior Ministry plan to counter “reactionary exiles.” Radio Free Europe was an important target, and a series of disinformation actions were planned to disrupt its operations.

  • October 30, 1956

    Other Hungarian-Language Radios

    Radio Free Russia, the voice of the Russian émigré organization NTS, begins Hungarian-language broadcasts and reports the readiness of the “Association of Former Hungarian Servicemen” to assist the Hungarian insurgents. [Radio Madrid in Hungarian broadcasts similar messages.]

  • November 03, 1956

    Comprehensive Guidance for Radio Free Europe Broadcasts

    An authoritative, cautionary US government guidance, approved by Allen Dulles and Deputy Undersecretary of State Robert Murphy, conveyed to the Free Europe Committee that afternoon.

  • June, 2007

    Association of the United Postwar Immigrants. Folder 52. The Chekist Anthology.

    In this entry Mitrokhin provides an example of methods the KGB used to make foreign intelligence services distrust Soviet anti-socialist organizations. Mitrokhin cites the case of the Association of the United Soviet Postwar Immigrants. According to Mitrokhin, the head of the organization was a former citizen of the Soviet Union, but after WWII he stayed in Western Germany and had been actively promoting anti-socialist ideology among immigrants. Mitrokhin does not provide his real name, but uses his KGB codename “Konstantinov.” According to Mitrokhin, in February of 1963 the KGB sent counterfeit documents to West German counter-intelligence stating that “Konstantinov” had been an active KGB spy since WWII. The KGB also sent letters in the name of Association of United Soviet Postwar Immigrants to National Alliance of Russian Solidarists stating that the officials of the latter organization are “politically bankrupt” and that they were no longer able to promote anti-socialist ideology. The KGB residency in Belgium prepared a flyer with false information stating that the Association of United Soviet Postwar Immigrants was a corrupt institution whose president used its funds for personal use. According to Mitrokhin, the reputation of the Association of United Soviet Postwar Immigrants was destroyed and no longer remained influential.