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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • January 22, 1950

    Record of Talks between I.V. Stalin and Chairman of the Central People's Government of the People’s Republic of China Mao Zedong

    Conversation between Stalin and Mao concerning a proposed treaty of friendship and alliance between the USSR and China. Discussion includes: the prospects of future Japanese aggression, the Chinese-Eastern Railway (Mao and Stalin disagree on who should run its administration), the Port Arthur agreements (including the question of the port of Dalny), and economic cooperation. The economic cooperation focuses on a Soviet credit program for economic development in China, as well as the question of arms shipments to China. There is also discussion of Tibet.

  • February, 1950

    Note from Andrey Vyshinsky to Zhou Enlai, February 1950

    Dialogue between Zhou Enlai and Vyshinsky on the currently friendly relations between the Soviet Union and China. References are made to trade as pertinent to the Chinese railways, harbors, and the necessary additions.

  • February 21, 1952

    Cable, Mao Zedong to Filippov [Stalin]

    Mao Zedong requests help from Stalin regarding the dropping of insects on North Korea by the United States.

  • July 26, 1952

    Cable, Zhou Enlai to the Chairman [Mao Zedong] and Comrades Liu [Shaoqi], Zhu [De], Peng [Dehuai], [Li] Fuchun, and Su Yu

    Zhou Enlai shares a draft telegram with Mao Zedong.

  • July 27, 1952

    Letter, Mao Zedong to Comrade Filippov [Stalin]

    Mao Zedong briefs Stalin on the proposed itinerary of a delegation to Moscow led by Zhou Enlai.

  • August 22, 1952

    Report, Zhou Enlai to Chairman Mao [Zedong] and the Central Committee

    Zhou reports on his meetings with Soviet counterparts. The discussions concerned the Lüshun Port, a possible Sino-Soviet-Mongolian railway, and rubber.

  • August 28, 1952

    Cable, Zhou Enlai to Chairman Mao [Zedong] and the Central Committee

    Zhou reports on the latest negotiations with the Soviet Union concerning the Changchun Railway, the Lüshun Port, and a rubber agreement. Zhou and Molotov also discussed the possibility of signing peace treaties with Japan.

  • September 01, 1952

    Report, Zhou Enlai to Chairman Mao

    Zhou and Molotov discuss a Sino-Soviet-Mongolian railway, the rubber trade, and editorial changes to several forthcoming Sino-Soviet agreements.

  • September 06, 1952

    Letter, Zhou Enlai to Comrade Molotov

    Zhou Enlai seeks technical support from the Soviet Union.

  • September 06, 1952

    Report, Zhou Enlai to Chairman Mao [Zedong] and the Central Committee

    Zhou Enlai and Stalin discuss Soviet assistance for the Chinese economy and military.

  • September 16, 1952

    Report, Zhou Enlai to the Chairman [Mao Zedong] and the Central Committee

    Zhou Enlai updates Mao Zedong on the latest conversations with Stalin and other members of the Soviet leadership. Topics of discussion included Soviet technical assistance to China, developments in the Korean War, the United Nations, and the formation of a regional organization for Asia.

  • December 17, 1952

    Ciphered Telegram from Mao Zedong to Semenov [Stalin]

    An application for military goods for 1953, a request for urgently needed military goods, and an application for materials for military production.

  • January 12, 1953

    Ciphered Telegram from Vasilevsky and Sokolovsky to Stalin

    A proposal of how many guns and ammunition can be given to the Chinese troops and at what rate.

  • January 15, 1953

    Ciphered Telegram from Semenov [Stalin] to Mao Zedong

    Stalin informs Mao that his request was impossible to complete at the time, but that the Soviet government is able to send 600,000 units of ammunition and 332 guns. The ammunition will be supplied monthly from January-April, 150,000 each month. The guns will also be supplied monthly from January-February, 166 guns each month.

  • January 28, 1953

    Ciphered Telegram from Semenov [Stalin] to Mao Zedong

    Stalin informs Mao that the Soviets are able to deliver 10 torpedo boats, 83 aircrafts - of which 32 are torpedo bombers TU-2, 35 are LA-11 fighter aircrafts -, 26 guns (37 mm), 8 guns (180mm), and ammunition. As for advisors, they're able to send an additional three.

  • January 29, 1953

    Ciphered Telegram from Mao Zedong to Semenov [Stalin]

    Mao requests from the Soviet government 3,000 tons ammonal, 24 million blasting caps, and 9.6 million meters of safety fuse. He asks that these things be supplied February-March, in two parts.

  • November 14, 1954

    Jawaharlal Nehru, 'Note on Visit to China and Indo-China'

    Nehru gives a detailed report on his visit to China and Indo-China. He first gives a summary of the issues and topics he covered in discussions in China with Zhou En-Lai and Mao, which covered a broad range of subjects including China's Five Year Plan, and various foreign policy issues. Nehru then describes his visit to Indochina, where he speaks with Ho Chi Minh (five days after he takes control of Hanoi) in North Vietnam, and also tours South Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia.

  • January 12, 1958

    Memorandum on a Discussion held by the Consul-General of the USSR in Ürümchi, G.S. DOBASHIN, with Deputy Chairman of the People’s Committee of the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, Comrade XIN LANTING

    Xin Lanting discusses growing calls for the separation of Xinjiang from the People's Republic of China.

  • October 02, 1958

    Memorandum of Conversation of Mao Zedong with Six Delegates of the Socialist Countries, China, 2 October 1958

    To the other delegates, Mao discusses their shared goal of defeating imperialism, primarily through peaceful methods. He stresses widespread Marxist reeducation of the Chinese people and increased Chinese industrial and agricultural production as means for improvement. Mao also reminds them that socialist nations must be firmly united under the leadership of the Soviet Union to fight colonialism and imperialism, and while the communes are necessary to organize locally, the party remains the core administrative unite of communized peoples.

  • September 15, 1959

    Mikihail Zimyanin's Background Report for Khrushchev on China (Excerpt)

    Mikhail Zimyanin, head of the Soviet Foreign Ministry’s Far Eastern department, reports to Khrushchev on the “new stage” in Sino-Soviet relations after the victory of the people’s revolution in China; China and the Soviet Union now share the common goal of developing socialist societies in their respective countries.