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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 24, 1964

    Bhabha Speech on Nuclear Disarmament United Nation's Day

    A speech delivered by Dr. Bhabha for United Nation’s Day on the subject of nuclear disarmament and general disarmament.

  • December 07, 1964

    Memorandum of Conversation between President Johnson and Prime Minister Harold Wilson

    In this conversation, President Johnson and Prime Minister Wilson discuss the MLF and the proposed ANF--the "Atlantic Nuclear Force," a British proposal as an alternative to the MLF. The two leaders weighed the pros and cons of both proposals, with President Johnson ultimately deciding to give a positive response to the ANF, leaving it up to the British to see if Bonn could be enlisted.

  • December 07, 1964

    Untitled Read-Out for State Department of Johnson-Wilson Conversation

    Account of the first day of the Johnson-Wilson discussions prepared by State Department Executive Secretary Benjamin Read probably on the basis of an account by Secretary of State Rusk.

  • December 08, 1964

    US Comments on the UK Proposal of a Project for an Atlantic Nuclear Force

    General comments relating to the establishment of an Atlantic nuclear force, objectives that any new arrangement of NATO nuclear forces must meet, specific comments on the UK's proposal, characteristics of the force, components, contribution of the United States Forces, non-dissemination of nuclear weapons, command and voting arrangements, review provisions.

  • December 10, 1964

    Memorandum of Conversation between President Johnson and Prime Minister Harold Wilson

    During this conversation Wilson, McNamara, Rusk, and Ball continued the discussion of the British proposal for an Atlantic Nuclear Force, including possible command arrangements. Other topics included the impact of the Chinese nuclear test and a nonproliferation agreement.

  • January 20, 1965

    Minutes of the Meeting of the Political Consultative Committee of the Warsaw Pact Member States, Warsaw

    (Excerpts) Minutes of discussions of the Warsaw Pact Political Consultative Committee concerning non-proliferation. The Romanian delegation argues against a joint declaration of the Warsaw Pact on non-proliferation for fear that it might be used against China. The other delegations argue that a joint declaration is necessary in order to prevent the creation of the Multilaterall Nuclear Force proposed by NATO.

  • July 09, 1965

    Memorandum of Conversation between Secretary of State Rusk and Rusk and West German Ambassador Heinrich Knappstein, 'Nonproliferation'

    In this broad discussion, one of the topics was the report on nuclear proliferation by a presidentially-appointed committee chaired by former Deputy Secretary of Defense Roswell Gilpatric. The Gilpatric report left open a controversial issue: whether a nonproliferation policy agreement should include provisions for MLF-type arrangements or eschew them.

  • July 09, 1965

    State Department Policy Planning Staff, 'S/P Consultants Discussion of Atlantic Affairs' with Cover memorandum from Walt Rostow to Secretary of Defense McNamara

    In this meeting between members of the Policy Planning Staff's board of consultants, the participants discussed their policy preferences towards European nuclear arrangements. Recognizing “bitter” French and Soviet objections to a collective nuclear force, the consultants believed that over time it might be possible to “get both the force and the agreement.”

  • August 03, 1965

    Memo on Work of the Committee of the 18 on Nuclear Proliferation

    Memo by CSMD A. Rossi on the resumption of the work of the Committee of the 18 in Geneva and the issue of non-dissemination nuclear weapons: summary of technical-military observations from SMD to MD of March 1964 on US proposal for declaration on non-dissemination, analysis on nuclear power guidelines and Non-nuclear countries; draft British and Canadian agreements presented to the Atlantic Council and reactions to alliance countries, statement Foreign Minister A. Fanfani to Geneva; US project of nuclear non-dissemination treaty, MAE instructions to amb. Cavalletti

  • March 01, 1966

    Analysis of the Italian Position vis-à-vis Nuclear Proliferation Nucleare and Disarmament

    Memo by amb. R. Ducci sent to MD Andreotti by A. Albonetti on problems related to the attitude of Italy with regard to nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament. The paper discusses the opportunity for Italian national policy to link non-proliferation to nuclear disarmament measures by nuclear countries and defer commitment to the NPT.

  • April 20, 1966

    Appendix: Extracts from the Speech delivered by the Leader of the Brazilian Delegation, Ambassador Sette Camara

    Comments on the signature of the Additional Protocol of the Preparatory Commission for the Denuclearization of Latin America.

  • April 26, 1966

    Directive, CPSU CC Politburo to Cde. Roshchin, Soviet Representative in Geneva

    Soviets contact the ambassador in Geneva about possible discussions with the Swedes and the Polish about the "detection club".

  • April 26, 1966

    Extract from Decisions of the Politburo of the CPSU CC of 23 April-4 May 1966, 'Point 21. On Steps in connection with the Proposal to Create a "Detection Club" with the Goals of Solving the Problem of Banning Underground Tests of Nuclear Weapons'

    USSR sending regards to the Polish ambassador about Poland joining the international "detection club" for underground nuclear tests.

  • July 11, 1966

    Deputy Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs U. Alexis Johnson to the Secretary of State, 'Comments on the Proposed Revision of the Draft Non-Proliferation Treaty,' with enclosures

    In this memorandum, McNamara, Rusk, and Adrian Fisher discuss amendments and language of the NPT treaty that was in stalemate that summer. Fisher saw the 1954 Atomic Energy Act, with its prohibition of the “transfer of atomic weapons to any other country,” as providing model language for an NPT because it was compatible with the bilateral agreements.

  • August 02, 1966

    Rajya Sabha Q&A on the Proposal to Destroy Stockpiles of Atomic Weapons and Their Delivery Systems.

    Transcript of questions and answers between members of the Rajya Sabha and the Minister of External Affairs, Sardar Swaran Singh, on whether India has placed a proposal for the immediate destruction of the stockpile of atomic weapons and their delivery system at the 17 Nation Disarmament Conference in Geneva.

  • September 23, 1966

    Adrian Fisher, Acting Director of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, to Hays Redmon, Staff Assistant to the President, enclosing 'Summary of Recent Soviet "Signals" on Non-Proliferation'

    In this report, ACDA Deputy Director Adrian Fisher summarizes Moscow's growing interest in reaching a final agreement on an NPT, in part because of its recognition of “pressures growing in third countries for development of nuclear capabilities.”

  • October 17, 1966

    US Permanent Representative on the Council of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Harlan Cleveland, 'Notes on Washington Trip'

    In the U.S. Ambassador to NATO Harlen Cleveland's notes on his meeting with Secretary Rusk, Cleveland details Rusk's thoughts about Soviet interest in the NPT. According to the Secretary, the “Soviets should have no real difficulty in finding a common interest with us in signing a treaty which enshrines [the] two self-denying provisions” of no-transfer to non-nuclear weapons states and “no relinquishment of control by the US over US warheads.”

  • November 26, 1966

    Message to the President from Secretary Rusk

    In this message, Secretary Rusk reported to President Johnson that the Soviet non-transfer principle, which ruled out MLF-type arrangements but left open other alternatives, was a “good formulation” that would be “acceptable” to the incipient West German “Grand Coalition” government.

  • November 28, 1966

    Adrian Fisher, Acting Director ACDA, and Leonard S. Meeker, Legal Adviser to the Secretary, 'Revised Draft Language for a Non-Proliferation Treaty,' enclosing Memorandum for the President, 'Suggested Language for the Non-Proliferation Treaty'

    Further review on the proposed NPT by ACDA and State Department lawyers in this report concluded that the language would “not disturb existing bilateral relationships,” that is, arrangements to provide U.S. nuclear weapons stockpiled in NATO countries for the use of West German forces and other allies in the event of war.

  • December 29, 1966

    Memorandum of Conversation with West German Ambassador Heinrich Knappstein, 'German Concern Over Draft NPT Text'

    In this conversation, Ambassador Knappstein expressed concern over the draft of the NPT that Washington and Moscow had agreed on. Knappstein worried that the draft articles would foreclose “all of the available options for participation in nuclear defense."