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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 07, 1962

    Telegram of Soviet Ambassador to Cuba A.I. Alekseev to the USSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    Alekseev sends a report on the nature of anti-Cuban propaganda and actions taken by the American government in United States and Latin America

  • September 08, 1962

    Memorandum, Malinovsky and Zakharov to Commander of Group of Soviet Forces in Cuba

    Malinovsky and Zakharov instruct the Commander of Soviet forces in Cuba on how to deploy navy, missile and air forces.

  • September 12, 1962

    Letter from Dutch Embassy, Havana (Boissevain), 12 September 1962

    A letter from Gideon Boissevain, the Dutch Ambassador to Cuba reporting to Amsterdam. The letter primarily concerns the press coverage in Cuba of the rising crisis. Particular attention is paid to the Soviet guarantees of Cuban security and the American responses to the discovered missiles. In Cuba there is fear of an invasion by the United States making use of foreign legionnaires, despite Kennedy's claims there is no plan for an attack on Cuba.

  • September 14, 1962

    M. Zakharov and S. P. Ivanov to N.S. Khrushchev

    Zakharov and Ivanov report to Khrushchev the extent of US surveillance in Cuba and request extra fortifications for Soviet ships in Cuban waters.

  • September 21, 1962

    Report from Prague, 'Subject: Artillery, Anti-Aircraft Artillery and Missile Emplacements'

    German Federal Intelligence (BND) report on anti-aircraft artillery and missile bases in Cuba.

  • September 21, 1962

    Letter from Dutch Embassy, Havana (Boissevain), 21 September 1962

    In this letter to Amsterdam, Dutch Ambassador to Cuba Boissevain remarks on how the American blockade of Cuba can effect Dutch trade in the Caribbean. He compares the situation to the one faced Japan and the Yellow Sea in the early 20th Century: Japanese control of the sea north of Shanghai strangled international shipping, and the British Navy was unable (or unwilling) to keep the Japanese in check. Boissevain decries the blockade of Cuba as foolhardy and says Washington risks losing the support of NATO over this.

  • September 28, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Havana

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy to Cuba reporting that the United States is already exercising, in a systematic character, strict naval and aerial vigilance around Cuba.

  • October, 1962

    Dutch Prime Minister Jan E. de Quay, 23-26 October 1962

    Short diary entries from Dutch Prime Minister Jan E. de Quay during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

  • October 01, 1962

    Roberto Ducci, 'I capintesta' [The Big Bosses] (excerpts)

    In the early pages of the chapter, Ducci describes how by 22 October 1962, he had just arrived in Brussels as member of a delegation which included the top echelons of Italian foreign policy: Foreign Minister Attilio Piccioni, Undersecretary Carlo Russo, Secretary General of the Ministry Attilio Cattani, and a number of other key dignitaries, including himself, who at the time was at the head of the Italian delegation which negotiated the possible accession of the United Kingdom to the European Economic Community. They had all gone to Brussels for a week of meetings between the Six members of the EEC, and were engaged in a preparatory meeting for the work ahead, when the news spread that the situation between the US and Cuba was deteriorating and that President Kennedy was about to give an important speech.

  • October 02, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Havana

    A telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Cuba giving an update on the most recent internal political situation of Cuba, Russian armament and military personnel arriving.

  • October 04, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to the USA Anatoly F. Dobrynin to the USSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    Dobrynin sends the results of a meeting between Rusk, himself and the Foreign Ministers of Latin American countries where they discussed questions of security, trade, and the question of the Cuban government in exile.

  • October 05, 1962

    Handwritten Note for the Record by Colonel General S.P. Ivanov

    Ivanov takes notes on a conversation with Khrushchev regarding the progress of weapons en route to Cuba.

  • October 05, 1962

    Malinovsky Report on Special Ammunition for Operation Anadyr

    The Defense Minister's report to Khrushchev about the progress of shipping of Soviet armaments to Cuba specifically states that Aleksandrovsk was fully loaded and ready to sail.

  • October 10, 1962

    Speech by Senator Keating, "Cuba"

    Keating alleges that there are six IRBM bases being constructed by the Soviet Union in Cuba.

  • October 11, 1962

    Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Presidium Protocol 58

    Protocol 58 provides insight into what was occupying the mind of Khrushchev at the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis. The theme of the meeting was centered around the Sino-Indian conflict, questions surrounding the McMahon line, and the future of Tibet. With the focus on China and India, it is reasonable to assume that the crisis caught Khrushchev by surprise.

  • October 14, 1962

    Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Presidium Protocol 59

    Protocol 59 further details the focus of the Soviet Union just before the Cuban Missile Crisis. Khrushchev was so confident that his plan with Cuba would go unhindered that he spent his efforts on resolving the Sino-Indian border conflict, thinking the matter with missiles was done.

  • October 15, 1962

    Cable from USSR Ambassador to the USA A.F. Dobrynin to Soviet Foreign Ministry

    Dobrynin reports confidential intelligence of "piratic raids by the so-called 'Alpha 66' group on the Cuban coast and on several vessels near Cuba are being carried out not from a base on the American mainland, but rather directly from the sea, from American landing ships carrying the corresponding cutters."

  • October 18, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak), 18 October 1962

    Drozniak discusses the possibility of US military action against Cuba, as well as Cuba's foreign relations with the USSR and the US.

  • October 18, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to the USA Dobrynin to the USSR MFA

    Dobrynin sends statements issued by Kennedy, Rusk, Taylor and Martin in a closed briefing for American media where they discussed the gravity of the Cuban issue.

  • October 18, 1962

    From the cable on the conversation between Gromyko and Kennedy

    Gromyko reported on his meeting with Kennedy. The Soviet representative argued that Cuba was never a threat to the US and Washington should end its hostile activities against Havana. He also warned Kennedy of the possibility of nuclear war in the event of an invasion of Cuba. Gromyko reiterated the Moscow's intention of supporting Cuba only in economic and defensive issues. Kennedy, however, pointed out that it was difficult to explain the surge in Soviet military aid to Cuba. The US president reaffirmed that Washington did not have any plan to invade Cuba, at least after Bay of Pigs and Operation Mongoose. The US was only preventing actions that could have led to war. Gromyko reemphasized the peaceful rivalry of the two ideological systems and proposed a meeting between the two leaders.