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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • March 05, 1949

    Notes of the Conversation between Comrade I.V. Stalin and a Governmental Delegation from the Democratic People's Republic of Korea headed by Kim Il Sung

    Kim Il Sung and Stalin discuss the military and economy in North Korea, Soviet-North Korean relations, and North Korea's relations with other foreign countries.

  • March 11, 1949

    Note, V. Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    The Soviet Commission on Korea prepared an official agreement between the USSR and DPRK, which gives the DPRK credit to purchase Soviet military equipment and materials.

  • March 17, 1949

    Agreement between the Government of the USSR and the Government of the DPRK regarding Extending a Loan by the Soviet Union to the Government of the DPRK to Pay for Equipment and Materials as Well as the Military Property Supplied to Korea

    Agreement between the government of the Soviet Union and the government of the DPRK to grant the Republic of Korea a loan to pay for the supplied equipment and materials, as well as military equipment.

  • March 18, 1949

    Excerpt from Minutes Nº 68 of the CC Politburo Meeting of 18 March 1949, '14. Concerning Korea'

    The Soviet Politburo approves several agreements concerning aid and trade between the Soviet Union and North Korea.

  • April 20, 1949

    Telegram, Shtemenko and Vasilevsky to Stalin

    A telegram informing Stalin that there has been about 37 violations from the South Koreans over the 38 parallel, and that the Soviet government should advise the North Koreans to take appropriate measures to be ready to respond to more provocative actions from the North Koreans.

  • May 15, 1949

    Telegram, Shtykov to Vyshinsky

    Shtykov recounts a recent meeting between Kim Il and Mao Zedong.

  • October 03, 1949

    Cable, Filippov [Stalin] to the Soviet Ambassador, Pyongyang

    Stalin asks the ambassador to find the Minister of Foreign Affairs in Beijing and tell him that they agree with the DPRK's thinking on the feasibility of establishing diplomatic relations between the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and the People's Republic of China.

  • November 03, 1949

    Cable Nos. 826-827 from Shtykov

    Shtykov requests the Soviet government to give Koreans further aid in instruments for an arsenal.

  • January 30, 1950

    Telegram from Stalin to Shtykov

    Stalin asks Shtykov to relay a message to Kim Il Sung about North Korea's proposed offensive against South Korea and Soviet Union's request for lead from North Korea.

  • January 31, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram, Shtykov to Comrade Stalin

    As a response to Stalin's willingness to talk to Kim Il Sung on the issue of offensive attack to South Korea and on Stalin's request of lead, Kim Il Sung, according to Shtykov, responded that he would like to set up a meeting with him, and that he would take necessary measures for the lead to be delivered to the Soviet Union.

  • February 09, 1950

    Outgoing Telegram No. 2429, Vyshinsky to Shtykov

    Vyshinsky relays that all of the things that Kim Il Sung requested are allowed.

  • March 09, 1950

    Telegram from Shtykov to Vyshinsky

    In a telegram to Shytykov which he then relays to Vyshinsky, Kim Il Sung writes that North Korea requests of the Soviet Union military and technical support. In return, North Korea is sending the natural resources such as gold and silver to Soviet Union. Kim requests that a

  • May 13, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram, Roshchin to Cde. Filippov [Stalin]

    The telegram relays a request from Mao, conveyed via Chinese Foreign Minister Zhou Enlai, seeking Stalin’s “personal clarifications” of his stand on a potential North Korean action to reunify the country. Mao sought the information after hearing a report from Kim, who had arrived that day in the Chinese capital for a secret two-day visit and clearly claimed that he had received Stalin’s blessing.

  • May 14, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram No. 8600, Vyshinsky to Mao Zedong

    The cable contains Stalin’s personal response to Mao's 13 May telegram. Using the code-name “Filippov,” Stalin confirms his agreement with the North Korean proposal to “move toward reunification,” contingent on Beijing’s agreement.

  • June 30, 1950

    Cable No. 405743, Shtykov to Stalin

    North Korea requests supplies and weapons from the Soviet Union.

  • July 04, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram No. 405840 from Shtykov to Feng Xi [Stalin]

    Shtykov reports on a meeting with Kim Il Sung and Pak Heonyeong concerning requests for arms, advisers and advice on how to move troops more efficiently. Shtykov proposes resolutions and advice.

  • July 05, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram No. 3172, Stalin to Zhou Enlai via Roshchin

    A telegram from Stalin to Zhou Enlai with regards to India's mediation in the PRC's entry into the UN, Chinese troop movements in preparation for a possible Southern/Allied counterattack, and Soviet planes flying over Manchuria.

  • July 13, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram No. 37219 from Feng Xi [Stalin] to Shtykov

    Telegram from Stalin to North Korea advising that they reply to UN Secretary General Trygve Lie's concerns for treatment of POW's through a radio broadcast by a POW saying that prisoners are being treated well by the KPA.

  • July 13, 1950

    Ciphered telegram, Filippov (Stalin) to Zhou Enlai or Mao Zedong (via Roshchin)

    Telegram from Stalin to Mao and Zhou Enlai detailing his response to the English protest concerning "the Korean question." Also, a request for confirmation of Chinese troop movements to the Sino-Korea border, in case of a repulse of North Korean forces. Finally, a confirmation of the plans to train Chinese pilots on Soviet jets, to be followed by the transfer of the jets to Chinese possession.

  • September 27, 1950

    Telegram from Matveyev (Razuvayev V.N.) to Stalin

    Matveyev describes the state of the Korean People’s Army, particularly the severe status of troops in Seoul and Busan after having encountered American air and ground forces. Matveyev also reports on a meeting between several Soviet and Korean foreign ministers in which Kim Il Sung assumed the tasks of both Supreme Commander-in-Chief and Defense Minister and ordered the deployment of troops northward. Matveyev also outlines the steps he plans to take as a Soviet envoy in aiding the desperate Korean army.