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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • June 11, 1975

    Todor Zhivkov’s Consultations with Soviet Experts on Relations with Romania

    Prior to his visit to Bucharest, Todor Zhivkov meets Soviet representatives in Sofia in an attempt to co-ordinate Bulgarian policy toward Romania with the Soviet government. They discuss Soviet-Romanian relations, role of Romania in the Conference for Security and Co-operation in Europe, Romania in the Warsaw Pact and COMECON, Romania and the Non-Aligned Movement, Sino-Soviet relations, etc.

  • September 06, 1975

    Note regarding the Meeting between Ilie Verdeț and Ji Denggui

    Ji Denggui and Ilie Verdeț discuss bilateral relations between China and Romania, nuclear proliferation and diarmament, Soviet-American relations, Comecon, European security, US policy toward Taiwan, Japan-Soviet relations, and economic development in China and Romania, among other topics.

  • November 12, 1975

    Record of Conversation With US Attaché In the USSR Jack Matlock

    US Attaché in the Soviet Union Jack Matlock was invited to discuss the Final Act of the European Conference in Helsinki. The Soviet Union publicized the text of the Final Act and faulted the United States for not doing the same. Looking at the principles of the Final Act, which the Soviet Union believes to be the bases for interstate relations in Europe, the government determined that radio stations such as "Liberty," "Free Europe," and "Voice of America" are not compatible with the goals and provisions. The Soviet government would like to improve relations with American journalists by first quickening the visa process and hope that the US would do the same for Soviet journalists.

  • October, 1976

    Material for Discussion in the "Permanent Commission on Issues of European Security"

    An analysis of the November 1976 plenary session of the socialist countries' permanent commission of scientific institutions discussion about issues of European security and cooperation.

  • November 15, 1976

    Committee for State Security Report, 'About the Hostile Actions of the So-called Group for Assistance of Implementation of the Helsinki Agreements in the USSR'

    This report by the Committee for State Security covers trends in anti-Soviet propaganda and the creation of the "Group for Assistance of Implementation of the Helsinki Agreements in the USSR" by Yuri F. Orlov. The purpose of the group was to promote the alleged failure of the USSR's efforts to implement the Final Act of the Conference for Security and Cooperation in Europe.

  • January 05, 1977

    Committee of State Security Report, 'About Measures to End the Hostile Activity of Members of the So-Called Group For Assistance in the Implementation of The Helsinki Agreements in the USSR'

    This report addresses the anti-Soviet organization "Group for Assistance in the Implementation of the Helsinki Agreements in the Soviet Union" led by Yuri F. Orlov and its influence in Ukraine and Lithuania. The Prosecutor General's office searched houses of several suspects and found anti-Soviet material in preparation for transportation to the West.

  • February 15, 1977

    Information from Gen. P. Stoyanov on Subversive Activity after CSCE Summit

  • March 02, 1977

    Clarifying the Position of the USSR and Guidelines for the Resumption of Preparatory Work for the Belgrade [CSCE] Conference

    This report explains the position of the Soviet Union on the realization of the Final Act of the Pan-European Summit by outlining remarks from a speech by L.I. Brezhnev in preparation for the CSCE follow-up conference at Belgrade. Points of consideration include the understanding that this is a long-term program for strengthening peace, security, and cooperation in Europe; Belgrade should not turn into a "bureau for complaints;" Belgrade should not be unjustifiably drawn out; and that the Belgrade meeting cannot alter decisions of the Final Act.

  • October 15, 1980

    Report by Permanent Representative to NATO Vincenzo Tornetta to Minister of Foreign Affairs Colombo: Atlantic Council - Consultations about security in view of the CSCE meeting to be held in Madrid"

    Report from the Italian permanent representative to NATO, Tornetta, from the CSCE meeting in Madrid discusses the French proposal for a Conference on Disarmament (CDE) in Europe, and the negative impact of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan on the international climate, even giving rise to disagreement among NATO members.

  • June 12, 1984

    Memorandum by Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Visit of NATO's Secretary General Lord Carrington (12th June, 1984)'

    A short summary from the ministerial session of the Atlantic Council in Washington. The focus of the discussion is on the role of NATO in East-West relations, CSCE, and the problem of INFs.

  • April 24, 1987

    Information from D. Stoyanov to M. Balev on Propaganda Against People's Republic of Bulgaria

    The Minister of Internal Affairs, Dimitar Stoyanov, reports on the coverage in the Western media of the alleged repressions against six Bulgarian dissidents who sent an open letter to the 1986 CSCE Meeting in Vienna. The letter claimed that Bulgaria does not comply fully with the Helsinki Accords on Human Rights of 1975. The Minister reports that although some measures have been taken to neutralize the activities of this particular dissident group, the official investigation has been suspended as there was a risk of further tarnishing Bulgaria’s image abroad.

  • November 24, 1987

    Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'East-West relations'

    An analysis of the state of East-West relations. The document covers US-USSR relations, CSCE, euro-Soviet relations, and USSR internal developments.

  • January 26, 1990

    Austrian Foreign Ministry, '[Excerpt] East German Report on Modrow’s visit to Vienna on 26 January 1990'

    The document relays a conversation between East German and Austrian officials about Austria's commitment to potential reunification. The document addresses the possibility in two parts. The first half focuses on leniency with travel and economic reforms including visa-less travel and potential car taxes. The second part focuses on the greater European Cold War balance and addresses topics such as disarmament and inter-bloc cooperation.

  • January 30, 1990

    Memorandum of Conversation Foreign Ministers Alois Mock (Austria) and Oskar Fischer (GDR), Vienna

    The document is an agenda of a meeting between Austrian Foreign Minister Mock and the Eastern German Foreign Minister Fischer. The talking points include visa requirements, car taxes, German reunification, the CSCE, Austria's neutrality policy, and a potential European Confederation.

  • February 21, 1990

    Assessment by the Austrian Foreign Ministry, 'Question of German Unity (State of affairs, February 1990)'

    The assessment by the Austrian Foreign Ministry of German Unity is broken into five subject areas. The first part concerns the responsibility of the Four Powers to a new unified Germany. Next, West Germany's commitment to German unity dating as far back as 1970. The third portion outlines the border and security concerns of East and West Germany, as well as the Soviet Union, United States, Great Britain, and France. The next part is focused on economic recovery, specifically the lack of certain goods in East Germany (ie cars and houses). Finally, the report addresses the future developments of a unified Germany with an emphasis on the security of nearby states.

  • April 26, 1990

    Johann Plattner, Austrian Foreign Ministry, 'The General Secretary’s [Thomas Klestil] Political Exchange of Views in Bonn (24 April 1990)'

    The document entails interviews with several Austrian and German officials and recounts their views on various issues surrounding German reunification. The first is an interview with State Minister Adam-Schwater where the primary focus is monetary unification and budgetary restrictions for integration. The second interview is with State Secretary Sudhoff revolves around European issues such as the CSCE, security, border issues, and the time frame for reunification. The notes from State Secretary Lautenschlager reiterate the need for monetary integration in addition to expressing Austria's desire for a European Coalition. The fourth section are notes from both Chancellor Kohl and Ministerial Director Teltschik. In it they reiterate East Germany's desire for reintegration and outline four pressing needs - decisions from the 2+4 agreements, a new security structure, disarmament, and economic development. Finally there are notes from the CSCE Summit, where Austria is asked to evaluate other Eastern European countries (specifically Yugoslavia) and evaluate neutrality in a changing European order.

  • May 07, 1990

    Memorandum of Conversation Chancellor Franz Vranitzky – President François Mitterrand, Bordeaux

    The document is a summary of a meeting between French President Francois Mitterrand and Austrian Chancellor Franz Vranitzky, and Vranitzky's ensuing presentation on democracy in Eastern Europe. This included Austria's duties and obligations to this process. Both ministers proceeded to reflect on their country's relationship with Germany both past and future.

  • May 08, 1990

    Memorandum of Conversation Chancellor Franz Vranitzky – Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, London

    The document contains a conversation between Chancellor Franz Vranitzky and Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Thatcher begins with the state of internal affairs in Great Britain then relates its position to the European Union and role in German Unification. The conversation then turns to the role of Austria and its effort to join the European Commission. In the wake of problems in Eastern Europe, Thatcher stresses her preference for Western Europe to avoid involving itself in the counter movements.

  • September 20, 1990

    Final Report by Ambassador Bauer, '4 ½ Years in Bonn; Attempt on Prospects'

    The document discesses the coalition between Austria and newly united Germany. It highlights the similar political views the countries shares and stresses its economic conflicts. The document continues weighing how to best unite Germany economically and its possible effects on the European Union. It ends with a commitment to ensuring Germany enters the European Union as an equal member.

  • November 21, 1990

    Record of Conversation between M. S. Gorbachev and Canadian Prime Minister B. Mulroney in Paris

    Gorbachev and Mulroney discuss the potential response through the UN to Saddam Hussein's invasion of Kuwait.