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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • November 05, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Moscow (da Cunha), 4:15 p.m., Monday

    Brazil's embassy in Moscow discusses visits by Novotny, Ulbricht and Gomulka to Moscow and says that there is the impression that the recent international events have created a state of disorientation in the community of socialist countries and that the great challenge of Khrushchev will be to accommodate this state of affairs in the short term.

  • November 06, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 10:30 a.m., Tuesday

    Pinto calls to attention the rude and violent tone of the proclamations of support to Cuba on the part of China contrasting with the relative moderation of the USSR and of its satellites. Pinto believes Mao is "taking a shot" at Khrushchev.

  • November 06, 1962

    Cable no. 350 from the Czechoslovak Embassy in Havana (Pavlíček)

    Pavlicek communicates that Anastas Mikoyan's talk with the Cubans has suffered a personal setback with the loss of Mikoyan's wife. The results of the meeting between the Soviet and Cuban delegations remain unknown as of this cable. Pavlicek speaks of a proposal by Brazil to "Finlandize" Cuba, which would mean permanent Cuban neutrality and the end of the US base in Guantanamo Bay. Calm has taken over Cuba in the aftermath of Castro's speech on 1 November, although many still have reservations about the actions taken by the Soviet Union, and demand answers from Mikoyan.

  • November 19, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Belgrade, 12:30 p.m., Monday

    A brief analysis of Chinese-Cuban relations during the crisis and Fidel Castro's diplomatic skills in his relations with both the United States and Soviet Union.

  • November 21, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 21 November 1962

    In a meeting between Mikoyan and the heads of diplomatic posts of socialist countries, there is a discussion of various issues relating to the Cuban Missile Crisis.

  • November 26, 1962

    Letter from Italian Communist Journalist Carmine de Lipsis to Senior Italian Communist Giancarlo Pajetta on Interview with Che Guevara

    A letter from Italian Communist Journalist Carmine de Lipsis to Senior Italian Communist Giancarlo Pajetta regarding an interview with Che Guevara. De Lipsis also includes detailed reading notes on this meeting to augment the rest of the letter.

  • January 28, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on 'Relations Between Cuba and the Socialist Countries Since the [Cuban Missile] Crisis'

    Hungarian Ambassador to Cuba János Beck summarizes the current relations between Cuba and other socialist nations. The Cuban Missile Crisis revealed problems in Cuba—weak communist party, a focus on world revolution rather than economic development—and stalled relations between Cuba and socialist countries.

  • March 06, 1963

    Record of Conversation from Chairman Mao's Reception of the Delegation of the Brazilian Communist Party (The New Party)

    Chairman Mao addresses the communist compulsion to revolution and past cases of revolutionary activities like the Cuban experience.

  • June 21, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy in Moscow (Szipka), Report on Soviet-Cuban Relations

    Hungarian Ambassador to Cuba József Szipka reports on Soviet-Cuban relations from the early stages of the Cuban revolution to the present. The Cuban government depends on economic, military and political aid; trade agreements; and cultural and scientific exchanges from socialist governments, primarily the Soviet Union. Szipka adds that the Soviet Union’s flexible political steps during the Cuban Missile Crisis ensured Cuba’s security from a US invasion. From Szipka’s perspective, the missile crisis was a valuable learning experience for Cuban officials.

  • August 13, 1963

    Italian Communist Ugo Pecchioli, Report on Trip to Cuba

    Italian Communist, Ugo Pecchioli, reports on his trip to Cuba. He discusses: the relative international situation of Cuba; meetings with Fidel Castro; the profound divergence that exists (in his opinion) between the Chinese Communist Party and the great majority of the other communist parties; the development of the struggle for democracy and socialism in different Latin American countries; and Italian and Cuban communist party relations.

  • October 08, 1963

    Letter from Gomulka to Khrushchev, Marked 'Final Version'

    Letter from Gomulka to Khrushchev discussing Polish opposition to Soviet proposal for a Non-Proliferation Treaty. Gomulka suggests that the treaty will further split the communist camp. While discussing the state of Sino-Soviet relations, the Polish leader suggests that the Soviet Union and the PRC adopt a common position in matters of foreign policy in order to strengthen the power of the Socialist camp.

  • November 20, 1963

    Minutes of the HSWP Political Committee Session - Views of Polish Leader Władysław Gomułka on the Cuban Proposal to Join the Warsaw Pact

    Władysław Gomułka views of Cuba’s proposal to the Warsaw Pact are recorded in the minutes of a HSWP Political Committee session. He explains why Poland opposes Cuba’s entry into the Warsaw Pact. The statements include concerns over the Federal Republic of Germany, nuclear and conventional weapons, and counter-revolution.

  • December 12, 1963

    Memorandum of Conversation, Vladimir Koucky, Secretary of Czechoslovak Communist Party (CPCz) Central Committee, and Carlos Rafael Rodriguez, Head of Cuba’s National Institute of Agrarian Reform (INRA), Prague

    The memorandum includes topics discussed between CPCz Secretary Vladimír Koucký and Cuban government official Carlos Rafael Rodríguez. Rodríguez lists points of misunderstanding between Cuba and other socialist countries. Discussion topics include Chinese publications in Cuba, Cuba's unique approach to socialist revolution, the proposed nuclear-free zone in Latin America, and building socialism under various conditions (e.g. Islam's role in Algeria), among others. Rodríguez encourages more communication among socialist nations to prevent misunderstanding.

  • January, 1964

    Information of the Bulgarian Embassy in Havana Regarding the Situation in Cuba in 1963

    The Bulgarian Embassy in Havana reports to the Central Committee of the Bulgarian Communist Party and the Bulgarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs on political, economic, and cultural developments in Cuba circa 1963. Cuba is politically united, but is experiencing economic hardship after the “Caribbean Crisis” primarily because of the US embargo. In the report, embassy staff reviews developments between socialist countries and Cuba throughout 1963. Some examples include communist aid to Cuba after Hurricane Flora and Cuba’s stance on Sino-Soviet relations. Bulgaria’s show of solidarity resulted in concrete political, economic, and cultural cooperation. Embassy staff notes the drawbacks and benefits of Bulgaria’s relationship with Cuba.

  • December 10, 1964

    From the Diary of A. I. Alekseyev, Record of a Conversation with Argentinian Communist Party CC Secretary, Victorio Cadovilla, 25 November 1964

    Cadovilla informs Alekseyev about a conference of representatives of the Communist parties of Latin America, in which Cadovilla served as chairman. At the conference, each of the representatives discussed the revolutionary movement in their respective countries. Cuban representatives, Castro and Guevara, asked many questions and voiced their opinions regarding the movement, the USSR, China, and Latin American countries' role in the development of the Cuban revolution.

  • March 20, 1965

    Minutes of Conversation between Cuban Defense Minister Raúl Castro and Polish Leader Władysław Gomułka, Warsaw, 20 March 1965

    During his visit in Poland, Castro relates Cuba's position on a conversation taken place in Moscow and why it may be of interest to the Cubans. Gomulka raises the issue of the missiles. In Gomulka's opinion two factors were decisive: contradictions which arose within the socialist camp and the policy which was conducted by Khrushchev. Gomulka is assured that US is capable of conducting a war with Cuba by way of conventional weapons, it does not have to use nuclear weapons. It is clear that the socialist camp and the USSR cannot defend Cuba in any other way but by using nuclear weapons. If a conflict is meant to be, then it will be a nuclear conflict, there is no other way. Gomulka further raises a question whether to go into a nuclear war or not. Castro disagrees with a manner nuclear weapons were withdrawn from Cuba by Soviets. Khruchshev explained that he did not have time. Per Gomulka, Khrushchev conducted a policy which was not thought-out and which was all-out. Gomulka further discusses his talks with Chinese and Vietnamese comrades re: nuclear weapons issue.

  • January 31, 1968

    SED CC Department of International Relations, 'Information on the Third Plenum of the Central Committee of the Cuban Communist Party and on the Attacks of the Cuban Communist Party against the Socialist Unity Party of Germany'

    The 3rd Plenum of the Cuban Communist Party took place in Havana on 24-26 January 1968. During the Plenum the decision of the Politburo of the CC was announced not to participate in the consultative meeting in Budapest. Fidel Castro held a 12-hour long speech.

  • November 25, 1968

    SED CC Department of International Relations, 'Note on a Conversation with Com. Carlos Rafael Rodriguez on 22 November 1968 at the Havana Airport'

    SED CC Department of International Relations writes this note on a conversation with Com. Carlos Rafael Rodriguez on 22 November 1968 at the Havana Airport with Com. Egon Winkelmann. They discuss foreign relations between Cuba and the GDR.

  • November 27, 1968

    Note on the Final Talk with the CP Cuba Delegation on 21 November 1968

    A Note on the Final Talk with the CP Cuba Delegation on 21 November 1968 about Cuba's foreign relations with various countries, including the Soviet Union and GDR.

  • March 11, 1976

    Minutes of the Meeting between Todor Zhivkov and Fidel Castro in Sofia

    Conversation for the record between Zhivkov and Castro during a four-day-long state visit of the Cuban leader to Bulgaria. Among the main issues discussed was the state of economic development in both countries, their relations with Albania, China, Romania and Yugoslavia; the Cuban foreign policy in Africa and the Caribbean; the civil war in Angola; the battle for the Third World.