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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • April 10, 1955

    Minutes of the Meeting between Zhang Yue and Sir John Addis

    Zhang Yue informed Interim Charge d’affaires of Hong Kong Sir John Addis of the Taiwanese plan to assassinate the Chinese journalist delegate to the Asian-African Conference when they passed through Hong Kong and asked the Hong Kong authorities to pay attention to this matter.

  • April 16, 1955

    Minutes of Conversation Between British Interim Charge d’Affaires of Hong Kong John Addis and Deputy Department Head Zhang Yue

    A Chinese Foreign Ministry representative asks for the government of Singapore to ensure the safety of the Bandung-bounded aircraft carrying Zhou Enlai.

  • April 28, 1955

    Chinese Foreign Ministry Reference Document No.1

    Chinese Reference Document No. 1 which includes the following articles: Ike says to correspondents that the USA is willing to hold direct negotiations with New China Britain wishes to be a loyal mediator between New China and the USA Burmese newspapers’ comments on Taiwan issue Nehru, Nasir and others speak to correspondents in Calcutta Menzies’s comments on Zhou Enlai’s proposal Kotalawela’s comment on the Asian-African Conference USA and Red China Bright prospect Bright prospect The Five States of the Colombo Conference and the USA Comments of the prime ministers of India, Pakistan and Egypt on the Asian-African Conference The Bandung Conference The Five States of the Colombo Conference and the USA. Allen’s comments on the Asian-African Conference Pakistan and Egypt on the Asian-African Conference

  • May 26, 1955

    Minutes of Conversation between Premier Zhou Enlai and British Charge d'Affaires Humphrey Trevelyan

    Zhou briefed Trevelyan about China’s position in Taiwan issue that was produced in a document produced by PRC National People’s Congress Standing Committee in response to Britain’s request.

  • July 13, 1955

    Minutes of Conversation between Premier Zhou Enlai and British Charge d'Affaires Con O'Neill

    O’Neill passed on US position on the Sino-US talks in Geneva to Zhou. Zhou and O’Neil exchanged the positions of both countries regarding the talks and the dispute regarding the repatriation of the Chinese and American nationals to their country of origins.

  • July 15, 1955

    Minutes of Conversation between Premier Zhou Enlai and British Charge d’Affaires Con O’Neill

    Zhou asked O’Neill to convey China’s opinions on the date and time of the first Geneva talk and a draft of Sino-US joint communiqué to the US government.

  • July 18, 1955

    Minutes of Conversation between Premier Zhou Enlai and British Charge d’Affaires Con O’Neill

    O’Neill passed on a draft joint news release from the US regarding the date of the first Sino-US Ambassadorial Talk. Zhou first disputed with O’Neil that the US calling the PRC capital "Peiping" instead of "Beijing/Peking" in the draft was disrespectful to China. Then, Zhou said that the Chinese government needed some time to consider the time suggested by the US as well as the wording of the draft. He did not accept the explanation from O’Neill regarding the draft per se and the name the US used in the draft.

  • August 25, 1955

    Record of Conversation from Premier Zhou's Reception of Ambassador Raghavan

    Zhou Enlai talked to Raghavan about two issues in the Sino-American talks: The release of American expatriates in China and the issue of Chinese expatriates in the US. Regarding the former, Zhou reaffirmed Chinese willingness to cooperate. According to him, there was no restriction and all American expatriates who apply would be able to return to the US. In the cases of Americans who violated Chinese law, however, it was necessary to proceed case by case and it was impossible to release them all at the same time as Washington demanded. On the second issue, the US admitted that they had placed limitations on the return of Chinese expatriates in the past. These restrictions had been lifted then but due to the number of Chinese expatriates and the pressure from Taipei, the problem could not be solved at once. Both countries agreed to let India act as a proxy for China and the UK act as a proxy for the US in this issue. Zhou and Raghavan went on to discuss some wording problems as well as the attitudes of both parties and the UK.

  • February 06, 1956

    Zhou Enlai’s Brief Statement to British Chargé d'affaires ad interim Con O’Neill Regarding the Princess of Kashmir Investigation

    Zhou Enlai welcomed the British confirmation that the explosion of the aircraft "The Princess of Kashmir" was a sabotage plot by Taiwanese agents. He went on, however, to criticize how the British and the Hong Kong administration handled the case. The latter released some Taiwanese agents whom Beijing held to be related to the murder case, used a person suspected by the PRC to be a Taiwanese agent in the investigation, and escorted several Taiwanese agents out of its border to Taiwan.

  • June 24, 1956

    Note from the British Representative Office in China regarding the 'Kashmir Princess' Aircraft Incident

    Con O’Neill informs Zhou Enlai that the 13 persons who were detained by the government of Hong Kong for investigation in connection with the crash of the aircraft "Kashmir Princess" had been deported due to insufficient evidence to hold any of them indefinitely on warrants of detention.

  • August 09, 1956

    Note to the British Representative to China regarding the "Kashmir Princess" Aircraft Incident

    Zhou Enlai expressed the dissatisfaction about the release of the detainees by the government of Hong Kong. He emphasized that before the case was resolved, the government of Hong Kong had the responsibility to investigate the incident and to report to the Chinese government.

  • October 14, 1956

    Notes of an Interview with Zhou Enlai

    Zhou Enlai describes China's desire to gain international recognition. However, the question of Taiwan as one out of "Two Chinas" makes it difficult to agree internationally, since Great Britain and the United States recognize Taiwan and not PR China as the legitimate Chinese government. Hong Kong and the US endeavor to gain control of Chiang Kai-Shek's Taiwan are also discussed.

  • February 06, 1958

    Abstract of Conversation: Premier Zhou and Ambassador Nehru

    Indian Ambassador to China Nehru and Premier Zhou discuss Sino-British relations, focusing on Britain's position on Chinese representation at the United Nations. According to the Premier, Britain is acceding to American demands and allowing the United States to create 'two Chinas.'

  • March 13, 1963

    Cable from the CCPCC International Liaison Department and the Foreign Ministry, 'Key Points of the Conversation from Chairman of the CCP CC Comrade Mao Zedong’s Reception of the Soviet Ambassador to China Comrade Chernovenko'

    Mao Zedong discusses the relationship between China and the Soviet Union and the debate between the two Parties, proposes a meeting for fraternal discussion, and commits to countering Western imperialism.

  • December 19, 1963

    Record of the Third Conversation between Premier Zhou Enlai and President Nasser

    Zhou Enlai describes the state of Sino-American relations and Sino-Indian relations. Zhou and Nasser also discuss the Egyptian economy and Sino-Egyptian relations.

  • 1964

    The Situation Surrounding the Establishment of Diplomatic Relations between China and France and Related Issues

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reviews the process of the normalization of relations between China and France and speculates how the establishment of diplomatic relations between China and France might affect China's status in the United Nations and with the UK, Europe, Africa, and Japan.

  • November 27, 1968

    Italian Policy towards the People’s Republic of China

    An Italian Foreign Ministry report on future policies leading to Italy's recognition of the People's Republic of China and Beijing's admission to the United Nations.

  • June 12, 1969

    Note Number 760 from Geoffroy Chodron de Courcel to Michel Debré, 'Chinese Foreign Policy'

    The French Ambassador in Great Britain reports new details on border clashes between China and the Soviet Union in Xinjiang-Kazakhstan, Chinese diplomacy in the Third World and with the West, and the state of Sino-British relations.

  • October 11, 1973

    Meeting of Prime Minister Trudeau and Premier Zhou Enlai at the State Guest House (Diaoyutai)

    Zhou Enlai offers Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau an extensive history of the Chinese Civil War and Chinese Revolution. Zhou also comments on China's foreign policy positions toward and views on the Soviet Union, nuclear war, Bangladesh, revisionism, and great power hegemony, among other topics.

  • March 25, 1984

    Cable from Ambassador Katori to the Foreign Minister, 'Prime Minster Visit to China (Foreign Ministers’ Discussion – Regarding Hong Kong)'

    Wu Xueqian informs Abe Shintaro of the Sino-British negotiations on the return of Hong Kong to Chinese control.