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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • November 23, 1981

    Memorandum from John Stein to the Director of Central Intelligence, '[Redacted] Report'

    Translation of a Polish document presented by the Polish Armed Forces on possible radical military measures against Polish strikes and protests. The military can either introduce increased combat readiness of the armed forces in an overt manner or secret preparations for surprises.

  • November 30, 1981

    Memorandum from John Stein to the Director of Central Intelligence, '[Redacted] Report'

    Translation of a classified report from the Polish Ministry of Internal Affairs, covering the general sociopolitical situation in Poland, anti-government and anti-party activity, labor and farmer unrest, the situation in mass media and artistic circles, the activity of the Roman Catholic clergy, violations of public law and order, and other hostile activity. Opinions of Western diplomats and press correspondents are highlighted.

  • December, 1981

    Information [for Gustav Husak] on the Progress and Outcome of the 14th Meeting of the Defense Minsters Committee, 1 and 4 December 1981 in Moscow (Excerpt)

    Summary of the 14th meeting of the Warsaw BlocDefense Ministers Committee. The ministers discuss the Solidarity movement and protests in Poland, and how to handle the issue in the media.

  • December, 1981

    Military Exercise: Report of a Representative of the Chief of USSR Armed Forces Communications at an Assembly of Signal Troops Command Personnel of Warsaw Pact Member Countries

    Speech discussing front-line communications and their importance in modern warfare.

  • December 01, 1981

    The Anoshkin Notebook on the Polish Crisis

    Notebook of General Victor Anoshkin, aide of Marshal Victor Kulikov. Anoshkin kept records of Kulikov’s meetings, phone calls, and conversations in Poland in December 1981.

  • December 01, 1981

    Memorandum from John Stein to the Director of Central Intelligence, '[Redacted] Report'

    Translation of a classified document from the Polish Ministry of Internal Affairs, providing information on: current political, socio-economic developments in the country; attitudes of the mass media, creative arts and academic circles; activities of the Roman Catholic Church; Western perspectives on Poland; and cases of disorderly conduct.

  • December 07, 1981

    Memorandum from [Redacted] to the Director and Deputy Director of Central Intelligence, 'Polish Preparations for Martial Law'

    Translated report details the latest available information to the status of martial law in Poland, and argues the government will not instate martial law in their conflict with Solidarnosc and instead opt for political solutions. It outlines the evidence for this with military and government intelligence.

  • December 10, 1981

    Session of the CPSU CC Politburo

    The Soviet Politburo discusses the Polish Solidarity movement and the possibility of imposing martial law in Poland to restore order and the communist party's authority.

  • December 11, 1981

    Cooperative agreement between the state security organs of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Soviet Union

    The parties agree to work together in protecting their soldiers from ideological diversion by anti-socialist agents and to continue exchanging information gathered by military counter-intelligence.

  • December 13, 1981

    CPSU CC Politburo Protocol (extract), "On Information about the Polish question for the leaders of the fraternal countries"

    Soviet ambassadors are informed that martial law has been declared in Poland.

  • December 13, 1981

    Stenographic transcript of the meeting of the Consultative Political Committee of the Central Committee of the Romanian Communist Party

    This is an extensive meeting dealing with the situation unfolding in Poland following Jarulzelski’s declaration of martial law in December 1981.

  • December 15, 1981

    Intelligence Information Cable, 'Background to the Polish Imposition of Martial Law'

    Report comes after the declaration of martial law, and takes intelligence from a former Polish General Staff Officer to illuminate some of the details that went into the planning of martial law.

  • December 17, 1981

    Minutes of the Meeting of the Executive Bureau [Politburo] of the Central Committee of the Romanian Communist Party

    Meeting of the Romanian Executive Bureau of the CC RCP, regarding the situation in Poland. The discussion focuses on what kind of aid the Romanians should send the Polish government.

  • December 18, 1981

    Intelligence Information Cable, 'Soviet Influence Among the Current Polish Leadership and Composition of the Council of National Salvation'

    Report elaborates on how the imposition of martial law makes the Polish government more reliant on Soviet authorities.

  • December 21, 1981

    Central Intelligence Agency, 'Background to Present Situation in Poland and Possible Soviet Role'

    Report outlines the various factors leading up to martial law, including Soviet influence, possible Warsaw Pact intervention, and possible public backlash.

  • December 24, 1981

    Intelligence Information Cable, 'Soviet Pressure on Polish Government to Act Against the Polish Church'

    Report discusses how after breaking Solidarnosc resistance, the next most important part of maintaining power is to lessen the influence of the Catholic Church. The Soviets propose tactics such as smear campaigns against priests, paternity suits, and getting priests drunk.

  • December 24, 1981

    Intelligence Information Cable, 'Possible Polish Strategy During the Present Phase'

    Report takes information from a former Polish General. He discusses efforts to strike a deal with leaders of Solidarnosc (Solidarity) to oust extremists and set up a new "Worker's Solidarity" organization to take protests against the government off the streets.

  • December 29, 1981

    Moldavia Communist Party Central Committee, Transcript No. 24 of the Meeting of Central Committee Bureau of the Moldavian Communist Party

    Summary of discussions and decisions made by the Moldavian Communist Party to combat Romanian nationalist propaganda. These orders mobilized the entire education system and print and broadcast network to bolster and reinforce “a scientific conception of the world,” “ideological convictions,” “firm political vigilance” and “a class-oriented intransigence towards bourgeois and revisionist propaganda.” Although China was mentioned as one of the responsible parties for this propaganda, the central culprits behind the “abruptly intensified hostile actions” seeking “to oppose the Moldavian people to the Russians and other peoples of the USSR” resided in the West and over the Moldavian-Romanian frontier.

  • 1982

    Beyond the Cold War

    Lecture by EP Thompson before the Worcester City Guildhall seeking to define the Cold War in a contemporary context. Thompson argues that the standard dichotomous definitions of the past have become improper and the Cold War is now best defined as a developed habit supported by the material interests of each side, most importantly military and political actors. He describes the Cold War as a method for leaders to easily access the ideological regulation and social discipline needed to ensure their positions. Therefore, Thompson argues, since these leaders have a direct interest in its continuance, people, and not states, must bring about any significant change in the Cold War.

  • 1982

    The New Hungarian Peace Movement

    Pamphlet from European Nuclear Disarmament containing two articles by Hungarian activist Ferenc Koszegi detailing the rise of independent peace groups within Hungary. Koszegi describes the make-up of the groups (mostly ages 14-20 and in secondary schools, along with religious groups) and problems for their growth and effectiveness, including the potential co-option by the existing state peace council and outside manipulation. He argues that the groups should increase communication networks and open dialogue with the west in order to survive and prosper. The pamphlet also contains the transcript of a speech delivered by E.P. Thompson to an independent peace group in Budapest advocating for such peace groups and the transcending of Cold War rhetoric for the purpose of nuclear disarmament.