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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • January 02, 1982

    Untitled report from Leon Tomaszewski, Polish Ambassador in Pyongyang, describing his conversation with Kim Il Sung that took place on December 30th, 1981

    In conversation with Com. Tomaszewski, Kim Il Sung analyzed Poland's declaration of martial law.

  • January 19, 1982

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry on Indian-Pakistani relations

    Report based on information from a Soviet ambassador on India's strategy for dealing with Pakistan. India is concerned about the military support Pakistan is receiving from the United States and China, as well as Pakistan's nuclear weapons program. India is receiving military support from the Soviet Union, modernizing its forces, and seems to be preparing for war with Pakistan.

  • January 25, 1982

    Cable from the Embassy of the Hungarian People's Republic to China, 'Some New Phenomena in the Chinese Pursuit to Differentiate Socialist Countries'

    Soviet bloc diplomats respond to a report on China's foreign policy and strategy to move closer to Soviet allies.

  • January 25, 1982

    Appendix to 'Some New Phenomena in the Chinese Pursuit to Differentiate Socialist Countries'

    Summary of Chinese foreign relations with socialist countries and anti-Soviet policy.

  • January 26, 1982

    Report, Permanent Mission of Hungary to the International Organizations in Vienna to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Report on a conversation with Indian Ambassador Dalal. Topics discussed include the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, India and Pakistan's nuclear programs, the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), and the upcoming election of a new Executive Director.

  • February 22, 1982

    Hungarian Embassy in Guinea, Report, 22 February 1982. Subject: Guinean-South Korean relations.

    Dirda notes the establishment of diplomatic relations between the two Koreas and Guinea.

  • March 11, 1982

    Hungarian Embassy in the DPRK, Report, 11 March 1982. Subject: North Korean activities in the Non-Aligned Movement.

  • March 29, 1982

    Minutes of the Meeting between Wang Sheng (Director of the General Political Warfare Department, Ministry of National Defense, Taiwan) and Lieutenant General Dato Shazali Che Mat (Head of Department of Military Intelligence, Ministry of Defense)

    General Wang and Malaysia's General Dato Shazali Che Mat discuss anti-communism and Taiwan-Malaysia military relations.

  • March 29, 1982

    Minutes of the Meeting between Wang Sheng (Director of the General Political Warfare Department, Ministry of National Defense, Taiwan) and General Tan Sri Mohd Ghazali Seith (Chief of Defense Forces, Ministry of Defense)

    General Wang and General Ghazali discusses Taiwan and Malaysia's common struggle agaisnt communism

  • March 29, 1982

    Minutes of the Meeting between Wang Sheng (Director of the General Political Warfare Department, Ministry of National Defense, Taiwan) and Abang Abu Bakar (Vice Defense Minister)

    General Wang Sheng and Malaysia's Vice Defense Minister discuss Taiwan's military system, defense spending, and anti-communist policy.

  • April 03, 1982

    Minutes of the Meeting between Wang Sheng (Director of the General Political Warfare Department, Ministry of National Defense, Taiwan) and Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad

    General Wang Sheng and Malaysian Prime Minister Mohamad discuss Malaysia's view of communist countries in Asia and Taiwan-Malaysia relations.

  • April 30, 1982

    Record of Conversation between Erich Honecker and Chinese Ambassador Chen Dong

    Erich Honecker tells Chen Dong that "what marred this relationship [between East Germany and China] is known and does not need to be spoken of."

  • May 12, 1982

    CPSU Memorandum, 'The Position of the PRC on Afghanistan'

    Report describing China's subversive actions against the Soviet occupation in Afghanistan.

  • May 19, 1982

    Memorandum of Conversations between SED General Secretary Erich Honecker and Afghan Leader Babrak Karmal

    Karmal describes threats against the Soviet-backed Afghan government from Pakistan, Iran, the US, China, and Egypt.

  • June 04, 1982

    Note for [name excised] from [name excised], 'State/INR Request for Update of Pak SNIE, and Assessment of Argentine Nuclear Program'

    A planned update of the Special National Intelligence Estimate 31-32/81 concluded that Pakistan’s nuclear program was continuing and new evidence suggested a “significant” Chinese role in the design of the weapons. Despite this new evidence, CIA estimates suggest that the required amount of fissile material for weapons production would not be available as early as had been predicted, and that a Pakistani nuclear test was not imminent.

  • June 08, 1982

    The State of Foreign Policy

    Discusses issues related to upholding Sino-Soviet relations, to maintaining an active foreign policy with socialist and capitalist countries, and touching on issues related to various socialist countries at the time.

  • June 09, 1982

    Conversation between Soviet Foreign Ministry Official Mikhail S. Kapitsa and Deputy Foreign Minister of Mongolia D. Yondon

    Record of conversation between Mikhail S. Kapitsa, the head of the First Far Eastern Department of the Soviet Foreign Ministry, and D. Yondon, First Deputy Foreign Minister of the Mongolian People's Republic. They discuss foreign relations with China, Japan and North Korea. They also discuss the current situation in Vietnam, India and Pakistan, and Afghanistan.

  • June 17, 1982

    Terry Jones, Office of Nonproliferation and Export Policy, Dept of State, to J. Devine et al., enclosing summaries of State Dept cable traffic during 1981-1982 relating to demarches on attempted purchase of sensitive nuclear-related products

    A summary of U.S. State Department cable traffic regarding Pakistan’s nuclear efforts in 1981-1982. While the Reagan administration was inclined to give Pakistan some leeway in light of their support for anti-Soviet forces in Afghanistan, the acquisition of sensitive nuclear technology from abroad was still something that the administration was against. Evidence that Pakistan had made efforts, some successful, to acquire specific technology that suggested a nuclear test was being prepared raised a red flag in the U.S. government

  • July, 1982

    National Intelligence Estimate, NIE-4-82, 'Nuclear Proliferation Trends Through 1987'

    With proliferation becoming a “greater threat to US interests over the next five years,” intelligence analysts believed that the “disruptive aspect of the proliferation phenomenon will constitute the greater threat to the United States.” While the estimators saw “low potential” for terrorist acquisition of nuclear weapons, the likelihood of terrorist/extortionist hoaxes was on the upswing. Significant portions of the NIE are excised, especially the estimate of Israel’s nuclear arsenal and its impact in the Middle East. Nevertheless, much information remains on the countries of greatest concern: Iraq and Libya in the Near East, India and Pakistan in South Asia, Brazil and Argentina in Latin America, and the Republic of South Africa, as well as those of lesser concern: Iran, Egypt, Taiwan and the two Koreas.

  • July 07, 1982

    Cable from Hungarian Ambassador regarding Talk with Soviet China Expert Oleg Rakhmanin

    Short summary of a conversation between the Hungarian ambassador to Moscow and Oleg Rakhmanin on China and its possible attempts to split the Eastern bloc countries, especially its warming relations with East Germany.