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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 25, 1962

    Cable from Soviet ambassador to the US Dobrynin to USSR Foreign Ministry (1)

    Dobrynin relays that Russian journalist overheard information about a possible US invasion of Cuba at the press club in Washington.

  • October 25, 1962

    Cable from Japanese Embassy in Havana to Tokyo

    A description of the Cuban reaction to the announcement of the US blockade. The Cuban press reports that President Kennedy's announcement is an act of unreasonable aggression by U.S. imperialists, and overall there is intense dissatisfaction about the situation among the revolutionary government and Castro

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from Mexican Embassy, New Delhi

    A Mexican diplomat in New Delhi is requesting more information on Brazil’s offer to mediate Cuba conflict and the possibility of Mexico joining that mediation.

  • October 25, 1962

    Memorandum of Conversation between Mexican Foreign Ministry Official and Peruvian Diplomat, Mexico City

    The Peruvian Chargé d’affaires Mr. Don Carlos Pérez Cánepa, visited the Second Undersecretary [Pablo] Campos Ortiz. The Peruvian diplomat is inquiring what the Mexican point of view was regarding possible military action (in which all the republics of the continent would take part) against Cuba.

  • October 25, 1962

    Memorandum of Conversation between Mexican Foreign Ministry Official and Canadian Ambassador, Mexico City

    A meeting between the Mexican Foreign Ministry official and the Ambassador to Canada. The Canadian Ambassador says that planes from Cuba landing in Canada will be inspected for weapons, no planes from the Soviet Union will be allowed to flyover or land in Canada, and questions why the Mexican government voted the way it did on the US Resolution. To which the Mexican official replied that there were concerns over the use of military force against Cuba.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 12:45 p.m., Thursday

    An attempt to assure the Secretary of State for External Relations, at Minister Roa's request, of the total falsity of the accusation that, in Cuba, there exists any offensive armament and that Cuba solely desires effective guarantees in respect to its integrity and sovereignty and is ready even to dissolve its Army.

  • October 25, 1962

    Cable from Israeli Embassy, Prague, to Israeli Foreign Ministry, Jerusalem

    A cable from the Israeli Embassy in Prague about the Cuban crisis - public panic, long lines at stores to buy basic products (oil, sugar, salt, etc.) and many denunciations of U.S. policies by Cuban citizens.

  • October 25, 1962

    Message from Swiss Embassy in Havana (Stadelhofer) to Swiss Foreign Ministry

    Stadelhofer speaks with Cuban Foreign Minister Raúl Roa, who assures Stadelhofer that he is working on putting a meeting together with Fidel Castro and Swiss officials.

  • October 25, 1962

    Notes on the visit of Soviet Chargé d’Affaires, Loginov, with Foreign Minister Wahlen

    Notes on the visit of Soviet Chargé d’Affaires Loginov with Foreign Minister Wahlen and their discussion of Switzerland's "policy of peace."

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    A telegram from the Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro to the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry about meeting with Brazilian officials to discuss the US preparing a military invasion of Cuba.

  • October 25, 1962

    Letter from Dutch Embassy, Havana (Boissevain), 25 October 1962

    Boissevain relates the Cuban response to the crisis. In a speech, Castro does not deny the placement of nuclear weapons, and claims this kind of denial has been heard more from Khrushchev. The impression is one of building missile silos which look like "ground-to-ground" launch sites from the air. The Cuban government is satisfied with the developments from the UN Security Council regarding the issue, as evidenced by the Havana airport being reopened for international flights.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak), 25 October 1962

    Drozniak discusses the ongoing Cuban Missile Crisis situation, including the rumors of a possible US military invasion of Cuba.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from TROSTNIK (Soviet Defense Minister Rodion Malinovsky) to PAVLOV (General Isa Pliev)

    Malinovsky provides military instructions in response to US Navy blockading access to Cuba.

  • October 25, 1962

    Letter from Prince Mohammad bin Saud

  • October 25, 1962

    Cable no. 323 from the Czechoslovak Embassy in Havana (Pavlíček)

    The cable states Cuba has alerted its armed forces to maximum combat readiness. Cuba's government had already taken the precautions of arresting known counterrevolutionaries in all aspects of society, with all important factors monitored. General aura of the country is one of tenseness, but the people continue about their lives as normal. There is a sense of strong revolutionary unity in the wake of this blockade, especially after a speech given by Castro. Cable concludes with a message that the first Soviet ship arrived on the basis of not carrying any military hardware.

  • October 25, 1962

    Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Presidium Protocol 61

    Protocol 61 indicates Khrushchev was already taking steps away from the crisis unfolding. Khrushchev decided that the ships carrying the IRBM missiles (the R-14s) on the high seas should turn around and come home.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    A telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana to the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry describing Vidaković's meeting with Brazilian Ambassador Pinto. They mostly discussed the Cuban crisis in relation to decisions made in the Organization of American States (OAS) councils.

  • October 25, 1962

    Political Letter from Ambassador Max Troendle to Secretary General Pierre Micheli

    A political letter from Ambassador Max Troendle to Secretary General Pierre Micheli describing aspects of the Soviet position on the Cuban crisis and how "It seems that on Cuba, the Soviets want to avoid meeting the American challenge, that they want to negotiate, talk, and not to face a showdown."

  • October 25, 1962

    Cable from Dutch Embassy, Washington (Van Roijen), 25 October 1962

    Van Roijen relates in this cable the details of a meeting with the US State Department's Bureau of Western European Affairs. With regards to Cuba, the Soviets assured the United States that they would not supply Cuba with offensive military weapons and even detailed the ranges of the missiles shipped. The construction of the bases was done in such haste that no attempt to conceal them was made, indicating the construction was on a time limit. These along with several other factors (the 1961 Berlin crisis, internal pressure within the Soviet Union) had convinced the administration that the Soviets had the fixed determination to confront the US.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Foreign Ministry to the Brazilian Embassy in Washington

    A telegram from the Brazilian Foreign Ministry to the Brazilian Embassy in Washington relaying a message from the Brazilian Embassy in Moscow regarding their interpretations of the Soviet Union's position on the events related to the Cuban Missile Crisis and U.S.-Cuban relations. The ambassador feels that the Soviets fear war more than the North-Americans; and he says that at no point does the Soviet government specifically refute the NorthAmerican affirmation that it is sending an amount of offensive armament with Cuba, limiting itself to reiterating that the Cuban-Soviet accord of 3 September for defensive military help to Cuba continues in force.