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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 5:45 p.m., Saturday

    Pinto tells the Foreign Ministry that he met with the Cuban Minister of External Relations, Raul Roa, but did not receive the Ministry's telegram message in time to ask Roa their question about the upcoming commission of the United Nations to Cuba and the Cuban government's affirmation that it would not accept any type of audit or inspection.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 7:15 p.m., Saturday

    Pinto believes that the immediate visit of the UN Secretary-General U Thant to Havana will be of major importance and, he is under the impression that the Cuban government is disposed to make important concessions in direct negotiations with him [U Thant].

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Swiss Foreign Ministry to Swiss Embassy in Havana (Stadelhofer)

    The Swiss Foreign Ministry in Berne and the Swiss Embassy, Havana (Stadelhofer) discuss Cuba's actions in regards to negotiations in the Organization of American States (OAS). He says, "In this superpower confrontation, Cuba has more and more lost its right of self-determination."

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from the Swiss Embassy in Cuba to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    A short telegram from the Swiss Embassy in Cuba to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs on the impression that Castro wants to await the reaction to the invitation of U-Thant to Havana, before he takes a position on the prompting to receive Swiss officials.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Ambassador Vidaković describes a meeting with Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos. Dorticos is convinced that the American attack and invasion will happen later that night.

  • October 27, 1962

    Cable from Dutch Embassy, Washington (Van Roijen), 27 October 1962

    Van Roijen relates that the U.S. State Department has great interest in learning about the mood in Cuba, particularly Havana. Van Roijen asks the Minister of Foreign Affairs to forward all of Boissevain's correspondences including his personal letters to him.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from TROSTNIK (Soviet Defense Minister Rodion Malinovsky) to PAVLOV (General Isa Pliev)

    Malinovsky demands that Soviet Forces in Cuba stop deployment of R-12 and R-14 missiles to prevent aggravation of the United Nations.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from TROSTNIK (Soviet Defense Minister Rodion Malinovsky) to PAVLOV (General Isa Pliev)

    Malinovsky prohibits the use of nuclear weapons without instructions from Moscow.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from TROSTNIK (Soviet Defense Minister Rodion Malinovsky) to PAVLOV (General Isa Pliev)

    Malinovsky instructs Pliev to send the ship “Alexandrovsk” accompanied by steamship “Bratsk” to the Soviet Union.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 27 October 1962

    Jelen discusses the Cuban Missile Crisis: military and missile bases in Cuba and Turkey, UN inspections of Cuba and U-2 planes.

  • October 27, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy, Havana, 'Report on Conversation with Cuban Official Joaquín Ordoqui'

    Chinese embassy in Cuba discusses with a Cuban official the likelihood of a U.S. invasion and war. They also discuss the mobilization preparations and Castro's position on fighting a war with the United States.

  • October 27, 1962

    Bulgarian Legation, Washington, to Bulgarian Foreign Ministry

    The Bulgarian diplomatic mission (legation or embassy) to the US reported to the Bulgarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Sofia what actions the embassy executed and planned to execute to prevent seizure of documents during the "international situation," or Cuban Missile Crisis. Enclosed in the letter is an explanation of items destroyed and items placed under heightened security. The letter also includes information about security for the embassy staff.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Moscow (Paszkowski), 27 October 1962

    [First Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Vasili Vasilyevich] Kuznetsov assessed the [UN] resolution of Ghana and the United Arab Republic [Egypt] as kind of a band-aid, but a one that nevertheless is significant. On the other hand, he considers the statement of the Afro-Asian nations as both good and strong.

  • October 27, 1962

    Cable from Dutch Embassy, Washington (Van Roijen), 27 October 1962

    Van Roijen writes again about the current situation in Washington just as the Cuban Missile Crisis is drawing to a close. The White House issued a statement regarding a proposal by Khrushchev. The statement's tough stance is attributed to Khrushchev's morning message which was completely different in content and tone to the personal message sent to Kennedy. The personal message amounted to admitting humiliating defeat by the Soviets with no mention of withdrawal of the U.S. missiles in Turkey. Van Roijen concludes that Kennedy made the right response to the previously offered Soviet deal, and kept the door open for consultation. The Cuban threat is almost "disappeared."

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    A telegram from the Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro to the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry about a meeting with Brazilian President João Goulart. Barišić says Goulart considers that everything must be done to prevent the beginning of war, because war would bring unpredictable catastrophe and it would be hard to extinguish it if war operations start. Goulart also shares his opinion that negotiations are necessary, and that Cuba must be prevented from becoming an atomic base for it could be the constant cause of war dangers.

  • October 27, 1962

    Cable from Soviet Foreign Minister Gromyko to USSR Ambassador to Cuba Alekseev

    A message from Gromyko to Alekseev to relay a message to Castro regarding American invasion.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to the USA Dobrynin to the USSR MFA

    Dobrynin relays the mood of the American capital and the presence of a real possibility of US incursion in Cuba.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Vidaković describes the positions of both Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos, with whom he met, and U Thant, who sent him a message. Both men relay the difficulties in dealing with the Cuban situation, especially concerning the resolution to the UN on inspections in Cuba and the imminent danger of a possible American attack.

  • October 27, 1962

    Air Letter from Mexican Embassy, Rio de Janeiro

    A letter from the Mexican Embassy in Brazil in which he comments on the position taken by the Brazilian Delegate in the Council of the Organization of American States (OAS) to vote in favor of necessary measures to impede the traffic of offensive weapons, but to vote not in favor of a condemnation of the Cuban regime.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak), 27 October 1962

    Drozniak reports on his conversation with American journalist and syndicated columnist Joseph Alsop about the Cuban Missile Crisis.