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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • May 27, 1963

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    A North Korean political officer speaks of Kim Il Sung's firm belief that an American nuclear attack could not destroy North Korea for their country would find refuge in the maze of underground caverns.

  • May 29, 1963

    Agreement between Cubans and Soviets Regarding Defense and Technology

    Agreement between the government of Cuba and the government of the USSR concerning the installation of technical equipment of the Revolutionary Armed Forces, and in reinforcing the defensive capacity of the Republic of Cuba and annexes. Includes timetables and charts outlining the import of resources from the Soviets to the Cubans over a period of several years.

  • May 29, 1963

    Secret Telegram from Maneli (Saigon) to Spasowski (Warsaw) [Ciphergram No. 7237]

    Cable from a Polish official in Saigan, Maneli, to Warsaw. detailing talks with Vietnamese officials and the Soviet ambassador. They discuss the investigations of the ICC, and the importance of probes into the Vietnamese situation. The Soviet ambassador notes that Soviet-Vietnamese relations have shifted.

  • May 31, 1963

    Telegram from Sergio del Valle Jimenes

    The document is a telegram to Sergio del Valle Jimenes about the agreement reached between the USSR and Cuba. Both governments decided to annul the 30 Sept. 1961 agreement (Annex I) for airplanes, materials, and spare parts.

  • May 31, 1963

    Secret Telegram from Maneli (Saigon) to Spasowski (Warsaw) [Ciphergram No. 7353]

    Report from Polish official in Saigon, Maneli, to Warsaw, on his meeting with Pham Van Dong. Dong describes plans for South Vietnam's future government and neutrality, along with North Vietnam's compliance with the Geneva Accords. Reports that Soviet Ambassador Tovmassian was surprised at the high degree of Chinese participation in Vietnam.

  • June 03, 1963

    From the Journal of A.I. Alekseyev, 'Record of a Conversation with Raul Castro Ruz, Minister of the Armed Forces of the Republic of Cuba, 25 March 1963'

    Fidel Castro decides on dates for his visit to the Soviet Union, discusses publicity and a potential hunting trip with Khrushchev, and requests that the details of the trip remain secret.

  • June 03, 1963

    Record of Conversation from Premier Zhou Enlai’s Reception of Ambassador to Cambodia Sisowath Sirik Matak

    Zhou and Sirik Matak discuss the treatement Chinese doctors offered to Queen Sisowath Kossamak, Chinese economic aid to Cambodia, and civil disturbances in Cambodia.

  • June 06, 1963

    Bulgarian Embassy, Athens (Minchev), Cable to Foreign Ministry

    Bulgarian Embassy in Athens staff member Atanasov reports on Greek media accounts of military preparations to the Bulgarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. According to Atanasov, Greek newspapers report preparations include Soviet movements in the Mediterranean in response to US submarines carrying Polaris missiles, Bulgarian maneuvers near the Greek and Turkish borders, and an anticipated NATO forward strategy in Greece. Atanasov adds that NATO is preparing the defense of possible attacks on Greece.

  • June 06, 1963

    From the Journal of A.I. Alekseyev, 'Record of a Conversation with Fidel Castro Ruz, Prime Minister of the Republic of Cuba, 7 September 1963'

    Fidel Castro meets artists of the Shevchenko Kiev Theater and directs the Council of Culture to arrange the Theater's concerts around the country.

  • June 06, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Görög), Report on Fidel Castro’s Television Report on his Trip to the Soviet Union

    Chargé d’Affaires ad interim Erzsébet Görög adds to a television report of Fidel Castro’s visit to the Soviet Union from 27 April-3 June 1963. Görög makes note of the fact that Castro uses a television interview to describe his trip instead of a standard, large speech. Görög finds a charismatic appeal in Castro.

  • June 10, 1963

    Gratitude for a Reception in Tunis

  • June 11, 1963

    Memorandum of Conversation between Soviet Ambassador to North Korea Vasily Moskovsky and the First Deputy Chairman of the Council of Ministers of the DPRK Kim Il

    Vasily Moskovsky gives Kim Il confidential information regarding the foreign policy of the USSR and discusses the visit made by Fidel Castro to a missile regiment in the USSR.

  • June 20, 1963

    Information About the Policy of the Korean Workers Party from the East German Embassy

    Criticisms of the DPRK are made about Kim Il Sung's personality cult, concealment of socialist countries' support, waning cooperation with socialist countries, intensification of China-North Korea cooperation, and distancing from the Soviet Union.

  • June 21, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy in Moscow (Szipka), Report on Soviet-Cuban Relations

    Hungarian Ambassador to Cuba József Szipka reports on Soviet-Cuban relations from the early stages of the Cuban revolution to the present. The Cuban government depends on economic, military and political aid; trade agreements; and cultural and scientific exchanges from socialist governments, primarily the Soviet Union. Szipka adds that the Soviet Union’s flexible political steps during the Cuban Missile Crisis ensured Cuba’s security from a US invasion. From Szipka’s perspective, the missile crisis was a valuable learning experience for Cuban officials.

  • June 23, 1963

    National Intelligence Estimate NIE 4-63, 'Likelihood and Consequences of a Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons Systems'

    This NIE comes to the general conclusions that “there will not be a widespread proliferation of nuclear weapons over the next 10 years” and discusses programs in various countries (Israel, China, Sweden, India, West Germany, Japan, etc.) This copy includes newly declassified references to the Israeli nuclear weapons program, including the conclusion that “the Israelis, unless deterred by outside pressure, will attempt to produce a nuclear weapon some time in the next several years.”

  • June 23, 1963

    Bulgarian Foreign Ministry (Angelov), Cable to Bulgarian Embassy, Ankara

    Deputy Forieng Minister Lubomir Angelov transmits to Bulgaria's embassy in Turkey information from Bulgarian Ambassador to Great Britain Radenko Grigorov. Angelov's message is handwritten and reports news about Soviet and US submarine presence in the Mediterranean, which initially Grigorov acquired from Turkey's ambassador to Great Britain.

  • June 23, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Görög), Report on Reactions to Fidel Castro’s Trip to the Soviet Union

    Chargé d’Affaires ad interim Erzsébet Görög writes a preliminary assessment of Castro’s state visit to the Soviet Union in 1963. Görög reports on improvements in Cuba’s party organization and positive reactions from the Cuban public and media on Castro’s visit. Görög notes different reactions to the visit between the economic/technical and artistic intelligentsia, adding that “Khrushchev managed to win Fidel over to his side in the Soviet-Chinese dispute.” Other topics include emigration and external counter-revolutionary activities.

  • June 24, 1963

    Agreement between representatives of Soviet and Czechoslovak security authorities on how to enhance security coordination

    This agreement between the representatives of seven Soviet and seven Czechoslovak security agencies relates to enhanced security coordination between the two countries. The parties agree to share technological changes, various resources and intelligence that is relevant to state security.

  • June 25, 1963

    Report from Hungarian Embassy, Prague, on Czechoslovak-Cuban Relations

    Hungarian ambassador to Czechoslovakia Lajos Cséby summarizes Deputy Head of the Sixth Main Department [of the Czechoslovak Ministry of Foreign Affairs] Stross’s report on relations between Cuba and Czechoslovakia. Stross reports friendly relations between the two countries, which did not experience difficulties during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Stross outlines Cuba’s problems, economically and politically, and believes that Cuba’s revolutionary success depends on its economic growth. Cuba misunderstood the Soviet Union’s approach to the Cuban Missile Crisis. This led to signs of Chinese influence on Cuban politics, which Stross believes are reversing since Castro’s [1963] visit to the Soviet Union.

  • June 28, 1963

    Memorandum from the Mexican chargé d’affaires in Washington (OAS) regarding a meeting between Alexis Johnson and Latin American Ambassadors

    At the request of the United States Delegation, the Council of the Organization of American States met this morning, in a “secret” session, acting provisionally as an Organ of Consultation, on the case of Cuba. The object of the meeting was to listen to Mr. Alexis Johnson, Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs, about the latest developments registered in Cuba. The talk was divided into three parts, namely: Presence of Soviet troops on the island; Visit by Prime Minister Fidel Castro to the Soviet Union; and Internal situation in Cuba.