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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • November 01, 1962

    Memorandum of Conversation between Mexican Foreign Ministry Official and Cuban Diplomat, Mexico City

    The Cuban Chargé d’Affairs, Mr. Ramon Sinobas, said that he had instructions from his government to ask the Mexican government for its support in the United Nations, to obtain acceptance of the five points that Prime Minister Castro had just made known.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Moscow (Jaszczuk), 1 November 1962

    Jaszczuk thinks that the public announcements that the US will not invade Cuba are a good start, but that they need to be "encapsulated in some kind of an international document."

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Moscow (Jaszczuk), 1 November 1962

    Based on the conversation between Paszkowski and Deputy Director of United States Department in the Ministry of International Affairs Sergey Kudryavstev, Jaszczuk describes the situation between the US, the USSR and Cuba after the recent talks and says that "We need to wait a few days for the results of the talks regarding Cuba" to take effect.

  • November, 1962

    Telegram from TROSTNIK (Soviet Defense Minister Rodion Malinovsky) to PAVLOV (General Isa Pliev)

    Malinovsky sends Pliev a timeline for transfer of weapons to the Cubans.

  • November 01, 1962

    Letter from Dutch Embassy, Havana (Boissevain), 1 November 1962

    Boissevain reports on the aftermath of the crisis and its effects on Cuba, especially in Havana. Rather than the majority being in support of government actions while a minority supported the opposition, there is a public outcry from the masses about the Soviet handling of the crisis. Fidel Castro's response is a speech to the people explaining the Soviet reasons for their actions, while the Soviet Union voices its support for Castro's Five Points and sends Anastas Mikoyan to Havana as a "troubleshooter."

  • November 01, 1962

    Cable from Soviet ambassador to the USA A.F. Dobrynin to Soviet Foreign Ministry

    Dobrynin relays a meeting with Lippmann in which the two discuss how close their respective countries were to war and the exchange of bases in Turkey.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos), 7 p.m., Thursday

    Campos discusses diplomatic gestures between Brazil, the United States and Cuba during the Cuban crisis and some misunderstandings that may have emerged during that time.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to the USA A. Dobrynin to USSR Foreign Ministry (2)

    Dobrynin sends the results of a meeting with Robert Kennedy where the two discuss ending the quarantine in Cuba and the state of the dismantling of weapons Cuba.

  • November 01, 1962

    Cable from Dutch Embassy, Washington (Van Roijen), 1 November 1962

    Dutch Ambassador to the United States J. Herman van Roijen sends a cable on a conversation he had with a member of the U.S. State Department. Firstly, the State Department was pleased to know Indonesian President Sukarno had not pledged support to Cuba during the crisis. Secondly, they hoped to make the point to Sukarno how alliance with the Soviets could not be relied upon, as the Cuban crisis and the Soviet abandonment of India have demonstrated. Thirdly, the Indonesian Ambassador Zain was going to pay six week visit to Jakarta, in an effort to promote U.S. economic support to Indonesia.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from USSR Foreign Minister Gromyko to Soviet Mission in New York, for A.I. Mikoyan

    Gromyko instructs Mikoyan to tell U Thant, McCloy and others that the dismantled weapons will leave Cuba by the seventh or eighth and to emphasize the speedy lifting of the blockade.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Israeli Embassy in Havana (Prato), to Israeli Foreign Ministry, Jerusalem

    Prato and Pinto discuss Brazilian efforts to pursuade Cuba to accept inspectors as well as what a potential U.S. attack would mean for diplomatic relations in the region.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from USSR Foreign Minister A. Gromyko to Deputy Foreign Minster Kuznetsov at the Soviet Mission in New York

    Gromyko sends instructions to Kuznetsov to meet with US negotiator John McCloy.

  • November 01, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba, 'A Cuban Leader Talked about the Situation (Continued)'

    A conversation with Joaquín Ordoqui in which UN Secretary-General U Thant, the U-2 spy plane, US military preparation for war, and Cuba's need for political and economic aid were discussed.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister V.V. Kuznetsov to USSR Foreign Ministry

    Kuznetsov sends the results of a meeting between Castro and U Thant, regarding UN representatives, the blockade and U Thant’s report to the UN.

  • November 01, 1962

    Coded telegram from Soviet official Georgy Zhukov

    Zhukov relays the message that John F. Kennedy sent, via Salinger, that the President needed proof that the weapons in Cuba were dismantled.

  • November 01, 1962

    Hervé Alphand, French Ambassador in Washington, to Maurice Couve de Murville, French Foreign Minister, Telegram 6179-6185

    Hervé Alphand, the French Ambassador in Washington, writes to Maurice Couve de Murville, the French Foreign Minister, that the United States (and President Kennedy in particular) does not believe the Cuban crisis is over, that Khrushchev was pushed to build nuclear bases in Cuba by his generals and that Cuba's behavior in this crisis represents a fundamental shift on the international stage of diplomatic relations.

  • November 01, 1962

    Cable no. 341 from the Czechoslovak Embassy in Havana (Pavlíček)

    Pavlicek relays to Prague the results of the meeting between Cuban foreign minister Raul Roa and UN Secretary General U Thant. Thant expressed sympathy for the Cuban people and acknowledged the right for Cuba to submit their considerations for the resolution to the crisis. The Cuban requests included lifting the American blockade, fulfilling Castro's 5 Points, and no UN inspection of the missile bases. Besides the meeting with the Secretary General, Pavlicek also recounts the meeting of a Latin American delegation including representatives from Brazil, Chile, Bolivia, Uruguay and Mexico. All nations but Mexico refused to give in to U.S. pressures, and stood in support of Cuba. Pavlicek then moves on to cover the possible subjects of Castro's speech on 1 November, including the Cuban detention of anticommunist groups in country and the results of the negotiations with U Thant. In the meantime, the Cuban government is concerned with curtailing the actions of anti-Soviet groups which have sown confusion and discontent among the population.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from USSR Foreign Minister A.A. Gromyko to the Soviet Mission in New York

    Instructions to the Soviet Mission in New York on negotiations with the UN, especially on the issues of the dismantling of weapons, American bases in Turkey, lifting the blockade and the composition of the group of Security Council agents.

  • November 01, 1962

    Memorandum of Conversation between Soviet Ambassador to North Korea Vasily Moskovsky and Kim Il Sung

    The Soviet Ambassador Vasily Moskovsky and Kim Il Sung discuss DPRK’s border security in the height of the Cuban Missile Crisis. By pointing out North Korea’s poor air defense and coast guard capabilities, Kim Il Sung requests an increase in the Soviet military assistance. He clearly states that DPRK is in favor of a peaceful resolution of the Cuban Crisis, because according to him, the socialist camp does not need a military conflict at that time. The two also discuss the economic development of the country.

  • November 01, 1962

    Mikoyan Cable to Central Committee of the CPSU about his conversation with US Permanent Representative to the UN Stevenson

    Mikoyan reported his conversation with US Representative to the UN Stevenson. The issues discussed include: An American non-aggression commitment against Cuba, the removal of the "quarantine", the methods for control of dismantling and dispatching of missiles, the normalization of relations between the US and their Latin American allies with Cuba, the liquidation of the US base in Guantanamo, the US proposal to remove ground-air missiles from Cuba, and the preliminary agreement between the US and the USSR over the issues to be discussed by the Security Council.