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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • November 14, 1962

    West German Record of One-on-One Conversation between FRG Chancellor Adenauer and US President Kennedy, Washington

    F.R.G. Chancellor Adenauer and U.S. President Kennedy discuss the Cuban crisis and the sense they both have that the situation is not yet entirely resolved. "The President indicates that one never knows what’s going on in the Soviets’ heads. The Americans never thought that the Soviets would dare bring missiles to Cuba and the Soviets never thought that the Americans would react so decisively. Both sides had false ideas about each other…"

  • November 14, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to the USA A.F. Dobrynin to USSR Foreign Ministry

    Dobrynin and Robert Kennedy meet again after Robert Kennedy had discussed the results of their previous meeting with his brother. Robert Kennedy expresses his opinions and how he believes the President will respond to Soviet negotiations.

  • November 14, 1962

    Letter from Mexican Ambassador to the Organization of American States (OAS) to Mexican Foreign Minister

    Letter from Mexican Ambassador to the Organization of American States (OAS) to Mexican Foreign Minister describing a recent meeting with Mr. Edward Martin, Assistant Secretary of State for Latin American Affairs and the various Cuba-related items that were discussed.

  • November 15, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba, 'Report on Fidel Castro’s letter to UN Secretary-General U Thant'

    A report from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba saying that Castro has send a letter to the United Nations Secretary-General rejecting any country or international organization who would conduct inspections on Cuban territory. The letter also reveals that US airplanes being sent into Cuban airspace could be shot down.

  • November 15, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Foreign Minister A.A. Gromyko to A.I. Mikoyan

    Gromyko sends instructions to Mikoyan regarding his, Mikoyan’s, negotiations with the Americans concerning Guantanamo Bay and future weapons in Cuba.

  • November 15, 1962

    Danish Defense Intelligence Service Weekly Brief (Excerpts)

    This weekly report from the Danish Defense Intelligence Service provides an account of the important events/activities from the past week listed by each day. It also includes the following summary: "Since the Soviet Union and the United States at the current moment have reached on an agreement about the inspection of the transports to Cuba, two issues are left unsolved, that is, the issue of an inspection on Cuba itself and the removal of the IL-28 planes. With regards to the inspection on Cuban territory, it seems like the negotiation efforts of Mikoyan have been in vain. And as for the removal of the Soviet planes, Moscow has expressed itself very negatively, since the planes now are regarded as Cuban property."

  • November 15, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Instructions on the Sino-Indian Boundary Issue'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry analyzes the attitude of Latin American countries toward the Sino-Indian border conflict and gave instructions on how to mobilize support for China's cause.

  • November 15, 1962

    Roger Robert du Gardier, French Ambassador in Havana, to Maurice Couve de Murville, French Foreign Minister, Telegram number 610-611

    Roger Robert du Gardier discusses his impressions of the effects of the Cuban Missile Crisis (on military activities, public sentiments, etc.).

  • November 15, 1962

    Premier Chou En-Lai's [Zhou Enlai's] Letter to the Leaders of Asian and African Countries on the Sino-Indian Boundary Question (November 15, 1962)

  • November 16, 1962

    Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Presidium Protocol 66

    Protocol 66 is the first Malin note dated after the Cuban Missile Crisis, on 11 November. The tone of the protocol indicates that Castro is not pleased with Khrushchev's handling of the crisis, and there is a growing sense of distance between Cuba and the Soviet Union.

  • November 16, 1962

    Cable no. 365 from the Czechoslovak Embassy in Havana (Pavlíček)

    The cable relays an important development in regards to press coverage of the resolution of the Cuban Missile Crisis. There are strict controls and reviews to be placed on news from the Soviet Union, and there is to be no publications by Presna Latina about peaceful coexistence or solidarity with the Soviet Union, about export of arms, etc. until a resolution has been reached. Khrushchev's name is not to be mentioned anywhere. There are also strict limitations placed on foreign correspondents and journalists.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 4:30 p.m., Friday

    Pinto analyzes Fidel Castro's decision to accept the “unilateral inspection,” when, beforehand, he always rejected inspection of this character.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Foreign Ministry to the Brazilian Delegation at the United Nations General Assembly, New York, 9 p.m., Friday

    The Brazilian delegation to the United Nations General Assembly advises the Brazilian government not to postpone the voting on the draft resolution about the denuclearization of Latin America.

  • November 16, 1962

    Israeli Foreign Ministry, Jerusalem, to Israeli Embassy, Havana

    Israeli Ambassador to Brazil Arie] Eshel sent a telegram from Rio about Brazil's efforts to mediate the Cuban crisis, as well as Brazil's attempt to pass a resolution at the Security Council declaring Latin America, Africa and the Middle East nuclear free zones but that they were unable to do so due to French opposition.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak), 16 November 1962

    There is a belief within the US administration that Mikoyan was not successful in convincing Fidel Castro to adopt a Soviet point of view.

  • November 16, 1962

    Cable from Japanese Embassy in Havana to Tokyo

    A cable describing the situation in Havana, Cuba after the US Blockade. It especially points out the economic results, like what product goods and commodities are available, and transportation networks.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 16 November 1962

    Jelen discusses various issues of the Cuban Missile Crisis: Mikoyan's visit; the shooting down of American planes; IL-28 bombers; etc.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Delegation at the United Nations General Assembly (Afonso Arinos), New York, 7:30 p.m., Friday

    Melo-Franco and Cuba's ambassador discuss the nuclearization of Latin America draft to the UN General Assembly.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 6:30 p.m., Friday

    Pinto discusses the current situation in Cuba and feels certain that Cuba depends more and more on Soviet economic help, but that Fidel Castro feels sure of that there will only be an overthrow due to an American invasion or by a prolonged total blockade, that will have more grave international implications.

  • November 16, 1962

    Information on the DPRK Position Regarding Measures by the Soviet Government for a Peaceful Resolution of the Cuba Conflict and Regarding the Chinese-Indian Border Conflict

    The reporter notes that the Korean press, Kim Il Sung, and the Korean Labor Party didn't talk much about Soviet aid for Cuba, and that North Korea supports China in the Chinese-Indian boundary dispute.