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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 31, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in the Soviet Union, 'Views on Khrushchev's Compromise with the United States on Cuba'

    The Chinese Embassy shares their opinion on Khrushchev's reconciliation with Kennedy after the Cuban Missile Crisis. They believe: Khrushchev’s activities "amounted to a bowl of cold water, poured right over the Cuban people"; because of Khrushchev, those who sit on the fence have now leaned rightward; American imperialists will, under the banner of the UN, create troubles for Cuba; and Khrushchev exhausted his words to exculpate Kennedy, which invariably stemmed from the concern to arrange a Cuba deal as a starting point, with the ultimate goal to push for reconciliations to be reached on other questions.

  • October 31, 1962

    Minutes, Meeting of Italian Communist Party (PCI) Politburo

    The Italian Communist Party (PCI) Politburo discuss recent events in Cuba: the revolution, US invasion of Cuba and the international political situation.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambasador to the USA A. Dobrynin to USSR Foreign Ministry, forwarding telegram from G.A. Zhukov

    Telegram from Soviet Ambasador to the USA A. Dobrynin to USSR Foreign Ministry, forwarding telegram from G.A. Zhukov

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from USSR Foreign Minister A. Gromyko to Soviet Ambassador in Havana with a copy sent to Kuznetsov in New York

    Gromyko tells the Ambassador to Cuba the date which dismantled materials will be removed.

  • November 01, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba, 'The Cuban Foreign Trade Minister Expressed Thanks to China'

    A conversation between Chargé d’Affaires Huang Wenyou and Cuban Foreign Trade Minister, Alberto Mora Becerra. They discussed China-Cuba relations (Chinese support of Cuba) and an incident in which Chinese comrades forced a Norwegian ship to go to Cuba.

  • November 01, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba, 'A Report on Fidel Castro’s Televised Address'

    Castro delivered a televised nationwide speech and talked about the following issues: the published part of the memorandum of the conversation between Cuba and UN Secretary-General U Thant, Castro explained that the weaponry shipped away by the Soviet Union did not belong to Cuba, and Castro praised the fighting spirit demonstrated by the Cuban people during this period.

  • November 01, 1962

    Cable no. 340 from the Czechoslovak Embassy in Havana (Pavlíček)

    Public opinion in Havana has soured after the actions of the Soviet Union to resolve the crisis. The press and radio are preparing the ground for Fidel Castro's speech that day, accompanied by a spike in Cuban nationalism. Castro visited a university where he expressed hope of a resolution to the crisis that would not negatively affect Cuba's security.

  • November 01, 1962

    Cable no. 347 from the Czechoslovak Embassy in Havana (Pavlíček)

    The cable from Pavlicek, received a day late, confirms that Castro's wish to not have an international inspection and dismantling of the missile bases went ignored. This sparked a great outrage among the prominent party members in Cuba, including Ernesto "Che" Guevara, who was crushed with disbelief upon hearing the news. The situation is one of general confusion as everyone awaits Castro's appearance, and his 5 Points to be fulfilled.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Chilean Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (Ruiz Solar)

    A telegram from Ruiz Solar (diplomat) describing Brazil and Chile's foreign relations with Cuba in regards to U.S.-Cuban tensions. It covers discussions in the United Nations on the subject and also the "Brazilian mediation" attempt to demilitarize Cuba.

  • November 01, 1962

    Memorandum of Conversation between Mexican Foreign Ministry Official and Cuban Diplomat, Mexico City

    The Cuban Chargé d’Affairs, Mr. Ramon Sinobas, said that he had instructions from his government to ask the Mexican government for its support in the United Nations, to obtain acceptance of the five points that Prime Minister Castro had just made known.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Moscow (Jaszczuk), 1 November 1962

    Jaszczuk thinks that the public announcements that the US will not invade Cuba are a good start, but that they need to be "encapsulated in some kind of an international document."

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Moscow (Jaszczuk), 1 November 1962

    Based on the conversation between Paszkowski and Deputy Director of United States Department in the Ministry of International Affairs Sergey Kudryavstev, Jaszczuk describes the situation between the US, the USSR and Cuba after the recent talks and says that "We need to wait a few days for the results of the talks regarding Cuba" to take effect.

  • November, 1962

    Telegram from TROSTNIK (Soviet Defense Minister Rodion Malinovsky) to PAVLOV (General Isa Pliev)

    Malinovsky sends Pliev a timeline for transfer of weapons to the Cubans.

  • November 01, 1962

    Letter from Dutch Embassy, Havana (Boissevain), 1 November 1962

    Boissevain reports on the aftermath of the crisis and its effects on Cuba, especially in Havana. Rather than the majority being in support of government actions while a minority supported the opposition, there is a public outcry from the masses about the Soviet handling of the crisis. Fidel Castro's response is a speech to the people explaining the Soviet reasons for their actions, while the Soviet Union voices its support for Castro's Five Points and sends Anastas Mikoyan to Havana as a "troubleshooter."

  • November 01, 1962

    Cable from Soviet ambassador to the USA A.F. Dobrynin to Soviet Foreign Ministry

    Dobrynin relays a meeting with Lippmann in which the two discuss how close their respective countries were to war and the exchange of bases in Turkey.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos), 7 p.m., Thursday

    Campos discusses diplomatic gestures between Brazil, the United States and Cuba during the Cuban crisis and some misunderstandings that may have emerged during that time.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to the USA A. Dobrynin to USSR Foreign Ministry (2)

    Dobrynin sends the results of a meeting with Robert Kennedy where the two discuss ending the quarantine in Cuba and the state of the dismantling of weapons Cuba.

  • November 01, 1962

    Cable from Dutch Embassy, Washington (Van Roijen), 1 November 1962

    Dutch Ambassador to the United States J. Herman van Roijen sends a cable on a conversation he had with a member of the U.S. State Department. Firstly, the State Department was pleased to know Indonesian President Sukarno had not pledged support to Cuba during the crisis. Secondly, they hoped to make the point to Sukarno how alliance with the Soviets could not be relied upon, as the Cuban crisis and the Soviet abandonment of India have demonstrated. Thirdly, the Indonesian Ambassador Zain was going to pay six week visit to Jakarta, in an effort to promote U.S. economic support to Indonesia.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from USSR Foreign Minister Gromyko to Soviet Mission in New York, for A.I. Mikoyan

    Gromyko instructs Mikoyan to tell U Thant, McCloy and others that the dismantled weapons will leave Cuba by the seventh or eighth and to emphasize the speedy lifting of the blockade.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Israeli Embassy in Havana (Prato), to Israeli Foreign Ministry, Jerusalem

    Prato and Pinto discuss Brazilian efforts to pursuade Cuba to accept inspectors as well as what a potential U.S. attack would mean for diplomatic relations in the region.