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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from USSR Foreign Minister A. Gromyko to Deputy Foreign Minster Kuznetsov at the Soviet Mission in New York

    Gromyko sends instructions to Kuznetsov to meet with US negotiator John McCloy.

  • November 01, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba, 'A Cuban Leader Talked about the Situation (Continued)'

    A conversation with Joaquín Ordoqui in which UN Secretary-General U Thant, the U-2 spy plane, US military preparation for war, and Cuba's need for political and economic aid were discussed.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister V.V. Kuznetsov to USSR Foreign Ministry

    Kuznetsov sends the results of a meeting between Castro and U Thant, regarding UN representatives, the blockade and U Thant’s report to the UN.

  • November 01, 1962

    Coded telegram from Soviet official Georgy Zhukov

    Zhukov relays the message that John F. Kennedy sent, via Salinger, that the President needed proof that the weapons in Cuba were dismantled.

  • November 01, 1962

    Hervé Alphand, French Ambassador in Washington, to Maurice Couve de Murville, French Foreign Minister, Telegram 6179-6185

    Hervé Alphand, the French Ambassador in Washington, writes to Maurice Couve de Murville, the French Foreign Minister, that the United States (and President Kennedy in particular) does not believe the Cuban crisis is over, that Khrushchev was pushed to build nuclear bases in Cuba by his generals and that Cuba's behavior in this crisis represents a fundamental shift on the international stage of diplomatic relations.

  • November 01, 1962

    Cable no. 341 from the Czechoslovak Embassy in Havana (Pavlíček)

    Pavlicek relays to Prague the results of the meeting between Cuban foreign minister Raul Roa and UN Secretary General U Thant. Thant expressed sympathy for the Cuban people and acknowledged the right for Cuba to submit their considerations for the resolution to the crisis. The Cuban requests included lifting the American blockade, fulfilling Castro's 5 Points, and no UN inspection of the missile bases. Besides the meeting with the Secretary General, Pavlicek also recounts the meeting of a Latin American delegation including representatives from Brazil, Chile, Bolivia, Uruguay and Mexico. All nations but Mexico refused to give in to U.S. pressures, and stood in support of Cuba. Pavlicek then moves on to cover the possible subjects of Castro's speech on 1 November, including the Cuban detention of anticommunist groups in country and the results of the negotiations with U Thant. In the meantime, the Cuban government is concerned with curtailing the actions of anti-Soviet groups which have sown confusion and discontent among the population.

  • November 01, 1962

    Telegram from USSR Foreign Minister A.A. Gromyko to the Soviet Mission in New York

    Instructions to the Soviet Mission in New York on negotiations with the UN, especially on the issues of the dismantling of weapons, American bases in Turkey, lifting the blockade and the composition of the group of Security Council agents.

  • November 01, 1962

    Memorandum of Conversation between Soviet Ambassador to North Korea Vasily Moskovsky and Kim Il Sung

    The Soviet Ambassador Vasily Moskovsky and Kim Il Sung discuss DPRK’s border security in the height of the Cuban Missile Crisis. By pointing out North Korea’s poor air defense and coast guard capabilities, Kim Il Sung requests an increase in the Soviet military assistance. He clearly states that DPRK is in favor of a peaceful resolution of the Cuban Crisis, because according to him, the socialist camp does not need a military conflict at that time. The two also discuss the economic development of the country.

  • November 01, 1962

    Mikoyan Cable to Central Committee of the CPSU about his conversation with US Permanent Representative to the UN Stevenson

    Mikoyan reported his conversation with US Representative to the UN Stevenson. The issues discussed include: An American non-aggression commitment against Cuba, the removal of the "quarantine", the methods for control of dismantling and dispatching of missiles, the normalization of relations between the US and their Latin American allies with Cuba, the liquidation of the US base in Guantanamo, the US proposal to remove ground-air missiles from Cuba, and the preliminary agreement between the US and the USSR over the issues to be discussed by the Security Council.

  • November 01, 1962

    Danish Defense Intelligence Service Weekly Brief (Excerpts)

    Denmark reports on the fact that the Soviet Union does not wish for a Third World War and have abandoned Cuba as a military base, although they hope to keep it as a political base. There is also some reports on conflicts going on around the world in the 'global' Cold War. As a part of this weekly intelligence briefing, there is also a list of dates from the week with important events/actions listed for each of those days.

  • November 01, 1962

    Józef Dryglas, 'Record of Conversation with USSR Ambassador V. Moskovsky'

    Moskovsky advised Pak Geum-cheol and Kim Chang-man to cooperate with the Soviet-led socialist bloc. Conversation with Kim Il Sung and Moskovsky imply strong relations with the Soviet Union.

  • November 01, 1962

    Brazilian Embassy in Washington, Analysis of the Cuban Missile Crisis

    Campos sends an attached memorandum of analysis of the developments of the Cuban crisis, elaborated by the Political Sector of the Embassy. It discusses Soviet motivation, American actions, Soviet reactions, etc.

  • November 01, 1962

    Soviet Record of 1 November1962 Dinner conversation between CPSU CC Politburo Member A.I. Mikoyan and White House envoy John McCloy and US Ambassador to the UN Adlai Stevenson

    Mikoyan talks with Stevenson and McCloy about the rate of dismantling weapons in Cuba, asked when the Americans would lift the quarantine, as they promised to do so and poses the question of American presence in Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. side says all will be fulfilled once the dismantling of weapons is over.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to Cuba A.I. Alekseev to USSR Foreign Ministry

    Alekseev discusses the response of Castro and Dorticos to certain documents.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from USSR Foreign Minster A. Gromyko to unidentified recipient

    The U.S. allows Soviet ships to arrive at Cuba for the hastening of the removal process.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from A.I. Mikoyan in New York to CC CPSU (2)

    Mikoyan discusses a meeting with McCloy and Stevenson where the two say that they approve of lifting the blockade for Soviet ships in order to speed up the removal process.

  • November 02, 1962

    Cable from Japanese Embassy in Moscow to Tokyo

    Describes the domestic reaction in Moscow following the Cuban Blockade by the US. The cable discusses how the real sense of crisis had been widespread in society, and that after the crisis was over there was a sense of relief.

  • November 02, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba, 'The Situation of the American Blockade of Cuba'

    A report from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba to the Military Intelligence Department describing the military situation of the US blockade of Cuba. It includes the US U-2 spy plane shot down and information regarding American troop and ship presence.

  • November 02, 1962

    Cable no. 346 from the Czechoslovak Embassy in Havana (Pavlíček)

    Pavlicek's primary focus in this cable is the effect of the crisis on the national media. The Cuban media is stressing Castro's 5 Points, and some journalists are hesitant to report anything else. There is a slight thread of anticommunism and anti-Soviet sentiment breeding among the media, but these feelings are not widespread, according to Pavlicek. The press is holding off on coverage of all other events such as the Sino-Indian border conflict and Chinese support for Castro's 5 points until after his speech.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Foreign Ministry, Belgrade, to Yugoslav Embassies in Havana and Washington and the Yugoslav Mission to the United Nations, New York

    The Yugoslav Foreign Ministry relays to its embassies a summary of the Brazilian proposal on the Cuban Missile Crisis which, they say, mainly includes: the denuclearization of Latin America with inspections, Cuba's commitment to not "export" revolutionary operations, and guarantees to Cuba for sovereignty and independence. Allegedly, Castro welcomed the idea of the above plan. Brazil thinks that the USA could accept it after negotiations.