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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • November 20, 1962

    Note for the Division of International Organizations regarding ICRC Involvement in the Cuba Inspections

    The Swiss Division of International Organizations describes the process of looking for reliable and especially politically unobjectionable constituents to staff the inspection team that will be deployed to Cuba.

  • November 20, 1962

    Cable from Dutch Embassy, Havana (Boissevain)

    The cable concerns the farewell dinner of Anastas Mikoyan, where Fidel Castro is notably absent, supposedly because he was seen drunk elsewhere. Mikoyan finally made Castro concede to UN Secretary General U Thant's last precondition to remove the IL-28 Soviet bombers from Cuba. Boissevain also reports on an air raid on a Cuban cargo ship, which was undamaged after receiving 11 bombs.

  • November 20, 1962

    Telegram from TROSTNIK (Soviet Defense Minister Rodion Malinovsky) to PAVLOV (General Isa Pliev)

    Malinovsky orders Pliev to load all tactical nuclear weapons on the ship “Atkarsk” and return them to the Soviet Union

  • November 20, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 9:30 a.m., Tuesday

    Pinto discusses Brazilian-Cuban relations since his arrival in December, especially during the period of crisis.

  • November 20, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba, 'Cuban General Staff’s Military Intelligence Department Talked about American Air Intrusion'

    A report from the Military Attaché of the Embassy in Cuba to the Foreign Ministry and Military Intelligence Department discussing present concerns with American imperialism actions (flyovers, troops stationed in Guantanamo, etc.); also the Sino-Indian border problems.

  • November 20, 1962

    Brazilian Foreign Ministry Memorandum, 'Question of Cuba'

    A memorandum on the Cuban Missile Crisis covering perspectives from the three major actors: U.S., Soviet Union and Cuba.

  • November 21, 1962

    Letter from Dutch Embassy, Havana (Boissevain), 21 November 1962

    Boissevain writes how nationalistic fervor is at the fever pitch in Cuba. He comments on widespread use of slogans and propaganda posters everywhere in Havana and the effects they have on the average Cuban. Despite the end of the military blockade against Cuba, tensions still run high between Castro and Kennedy. The island is now "completely isolated" resulting in severe shipping delays from Europe, if any arrive at all.

  • November 21, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 21 November 1962

    Jelen discusses: Mikoyan's views on Soviet-Cuban differences; Hungary 1956; and the leaders of the Polish Communist Party (KPP).

  • November 21, 1962

    Cable from Japanese Embassy in Havana to Tokyo

    A brief, but expansive, report on the situation in Cuba. It includes: the Mikoyan-Castro talks, the various groups within the revolutionary government and Castro's opposition of any kind of base inspections.

  • November 21, 1962

    News Wire Dispatch on United Press International Agency Coverage of the US-USSR negotiations

    Telegraph Agency of the Soviet Union (TASS) news wire dispatch. The United Press International Agency reported on the sides' softened stances in negotiation and U Thant's role in the inspection issue.

  • November 21, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 21 November 1962

    In a meeting between Mikoyan and the heads of diplomatic posts of socialist countries, there is a discussion of various issues relating to the Cuban Missile Crisis.

  • November 21, 1962

    Cable no. 370 from the Czechoslovak Embassy in Havana (Pavlíček)

    Pavlicek, through Mikoyan, relays the results of the talks with the Cubans, despite Mikoyan being tightlipped about the nature of the talks in front of the Chinese. Mikoyan made the case that Soviet actions prevented a devastating nuclear war, while the USA provoked the situation and presented the danger of a nuclear war. The Cuban revolution will remain unchanged and instead grow stronger, with the blockade lifted and a guarantee of non-aggression on the part of the USA. In exchange, the missile sites will be dismantled and removed under supervision. Mikoyan concluded it was understandable that Cubans felt confused and rattled after the crisis, as in the Soviet Union the reactions were the same.

  • November 21, 1962

    Minutes of Conversation between Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Zhang Hanfu and Ambassadors from Socialist Countries on Beijing's Decision to Unilaterally Withdraw Its Forces

    Zhang Hanfu informed the ambassadors of China's decision to unilaterally withdraw its forces 20 kilometers from the Line of Actual Control and answered some of their questions.

  • November 22, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba, 'A Brief Report of the Conversation with a Cuban Artillery Commander'

    A correspondence from the Military Attaché Office of the Embassy in Cuba to the Foreign Ministry and Military Intelligence Department describing their thoughts on the potential US military invasion of Cuba and the need for strengthening national defenses.

  • November 22, 1962

    Danish Defense Intelligence Service Weekly Brief (Excerpts)

    The Danish Defense Intelligence Service reports on the general standing of several nations after the Cuban Missile Crisis and says that detente is not likely at this time. This weekly report also includes a list of the important events/actions from that week by each day.

  • November 23, 1962

    Cable from Mikoyan to CC CPSU

    Mikoyan relays Castro’s willingness to carry out demobilization.

  • November 23, 1962

    Cable from Wang Tao, 'Chairman Ho Meeting with Chargé D'Affaires Wang'

    Ho Chi Minh, Chairman of the Central Committee of the Labor Party of Vietnam, discusses his views on the Sino-Indian border conflict and mediation methods employed

  • November 24, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Vietnam, 'Chairman Ho Discusses the Following Two Situations'

    Ho Chi Minh evaluates Jawaharlal Nehru and the Sino-Indian border dispute.

  • November 24, 1962

    Cable no. 384 from the Czechoslovak Embassy in Havana (Pavlíček)

    Anastas Mikoyan awaits the results of the New York City meetings and is actively preparing for the UN Security Council meeting in this cable. While Mikoyan is waiting with anticipation, there are still signs of reservation among the Cuban people and the revolutionary government regarding the approach of the Soviet Union. Confidence in the Soviet Union as a reliable ally has waned, accompanied by a loss of prestige and trust. The doubts are marked by a belief the U.S. will not hold up its end of the agreements, Cuba's stubborn refusal of inspections, and the belief that the resolution was bought at too high a price at the expense of the Cuban revolution.

  • November 24, 1962

    Minutes of Conversation between Chinese Director of First Department of Asian Affairs Zhang Wenjin and Ambassador of Pakistan Raza

    Ambassador Raza expressed his support for China in the Sino-Indian border conflict, accused India of being two-faced, and talked about how people had misunderstood Pakistan in favor of India in the past.