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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • January 21, 1963

    Secret Telegram from Rapacki (New Delhi) to Naszkowski (Warsaw) [Ciphergram No. 915]

    Memorandum of conversation between Adam Rapacki and Jawaharlal Nehru. Nehru discusses difficulties between India and China, and aid received from the United States and Great Britain.

  • January 21, 1963

    Galbraith’s Journal Entry Account of the Conversation with Rapacki and Michałowski in New Delhi

    Record of conversation between John Kenneth Galbraith and Polish officials Jerzy Michałowski and Adam Rapacki. The Polish officials note that the American campaign is encouraging the North Vietnamese to look to the Chinese for help. Galbraith calls for a six month ceasefire as a sign of good faith.

  • January 22, 1963

    Secret Telegram from Rapacki (New Delhi) to Naszkowski (Warsaw) [Ciphergram No. 995]

    Message sent from Adam Rapacki back to Moscow describing a talk with Jawaharlal Nehru. Notes that the Indians expressed interest in expanding economic relations with Poland. Also notes that he accepted the Ceylonese invitation for Polish officials to visit Ceylon.

  • January 24, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on Soviet-Cuban Conflicts

    Hungarian Ambassador to Cuba János Beck reports on post-Cuban-Missile-Crisis conflict between Cuba and the Soviet Union. Beck highlights Cuba’s tendency to act independent of socialist country opinion. He also mentions the negative influence of nationalism on the Cuban government, which has a direct influence on Soviet-Cuban relations. The Soviets believe Cubans do not understand that Soviet negotiations with the US secured Cuba from a future US invasion. The Cuban Missile Crisis also is evidence that neither the US or Soviet Union want to start a nuclear war.

  • January 25, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy, Havana (Beck), Report on 'The Visible signs of the Cuban-Soviet Conflict'

    Hungarian Ambassador to Cuba János Beck reports on post-Cuban-Missile-Crisis conflict between Cuba and the Soviet Union. Beck uses cases—poor reception on official visits, official speeches, lack of press coverage of the Soviet Union, etc.—to exemplify the conflict.

  • January 28, 1963

    Bulgarian Consulate, Istanbul (Karadimov), Cable to Foreign Ministry

    Bulgarian General Consul in Istanbul Dimo Karadimov reports to the Bulgarian Foreign Ministry news of new ballistic missiles in Turkey. Specifically, Karadimov notes that the US military will replace Jupiter missiles with Polaris missiles within the year. Karadimov cannot confirm NATO's involvement.

  • January 28, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on 'Relations Between Cuba and the Socialist Countries Since the [Cuban Missile] Crisis'

    Hungarian Ambassador to Cuba János Beck summarizes the current relations between Cuba and other socialist nations. The Cuban Missile Crisis revealed problems in Cuba—weak communist party, a focus on world revolution rather than economic development—and stalled relations between Cuba and socialist countries.

  • January 28, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on Soviet Deputy Foreign Ministry Vasily Kuznetsov

    Hungarian Ambassador to Cuba János Beck recounts an evening at the Soviet ambassador’s home with other socialist ambassadors to Cuba. Soviet functionary Kuznetsov reported on deliberations between the Soviet Union and United States on the Cuban Missile Crisis and nuclear issues. Beck also describes events that Kuznetsov attended while visiting Cuba, not all welcoming. Kuznetsov met with Castro while in Cuba and addressed the crisis among other problems.

  • January 30, 1963

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Trade Ministry

    The Chinese Ministry of Foreign Trade sends a report on trade negotiations with North Vietnam and North Korea.

  • January 30, 1963

    Summary of Trade Negotiations with Korea and Vietnam for 1963

    A Chinese report regarding its successful conclusion and prompt signing of two trade agreements with North Korea and Vietnam in 1963.

  • January 31, 1963

    Secret Telegram from Rapacki (Warsaw) to Jaszczuk (Moscow)

    Cable from Adam Rapacki to the Polish representative in Moscow informing him of Jerzy Michałowski’s coming arrival in Moscow, in light of recent Soviet-US and Polish-US talks on South Vietnam.

  • January 31, 1963

    Letter from Khrushchev to Fidel Castro

    Khrushchev wrote to Fidel Castro to discuss the issues in the two countries' relation after the Cuban Missile Crisis. The Soviet leader attacked voices from other countries, including socialist ones, blaming the USSR of being opportunistic and self-serving. He explained the decision to withdraw missiles from Cuba, stressing the possibility of advancing Communism through peaceful means. Khrushchev underlined the importance of guaranteeing against an American attack on Cuba and urged Havana to focus on economic, cultural and technological development to become a shining beacon of socialism in Latin America. Besides, he also invited Fidel Castro to visit Moscow and discuss the preparations for such a trip.

  • February, 1963

    Soviet Memorandum on the Polish Peace Initiative on Vietnam

    Soviet memorandum on the meeting between US Ambassador John Kenneth Galbraith and Polish officials Michalowski and Rapacki. Describes the meeting as a sign of US weariness of involvement in Southeast Asia. Asserts that a neutralized Vietnam could be useful to the socialist countries as well.

  • February 01, 1963

    Memorandum of Conversation between the Delegates from the Society for Soviet-Chinese Friendship (OKSD), Li Xigeng and Li Zhanwu, with the Society's General Secretariat, 18 November 1962

    A Soviet delegation visiting China meets with local representatives of the Society for Soviet-Chinese Friendship (OKSD) and the two groups have a tense conversation about the Soviet handling of the recent Cuban Missile Crisis.

  • February 06, 1963

    Information on Data, Received from Greek and Turkish Legations

  • February 06, 1963

    Memorandum from the Federal Directory of Security

    Mexican Federal Director of Security Manuel Rangel Escamilla reports on representatives of the Soviet Communist Youth's arrival from Moscow, describing the reception they received and providing an overview of their itinerary.

  • February 08, 1963

    Request for a Leave of Absence

  • February 09, 1963

    Proposal of the Minister of the Interior D. Dikov to Bulgarian Secretariat on Exchange of Arrested Agents between Bulgaria and Greece

    The Minister of Internal Affairs, Diko Dikov, seeks authorization from the BCP CC Secretariat for the proposed exchange of captured intelligence operatives between Greece and Bulgaria.

  • February 12, 1963

    Bulgarian Legation, Washington (Shterev), Cable to Foreign Ministry

    Bulgaria's Charge d' Affaires to the US Kiril Shterev writes to the Bulgarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs explaining that the US planned on stationing B47 bombers in Turkey once the Jupiter missiles are removed from Turkey. Shterev cites journalist Paul Scott as his source for the information about the display of the Unites States' military presence.

  • February 13, 1963

    Secret Telegram from Jaszczuk (Moscow) to Rapacki (Warsaw) [Ciphergram No. 2004]

    Cable sent from a Polish representative in Moscow to Adam Rapacki in Warsaw about a meeting with Andrei Gromyko. He believes that the United States wishes to remove itself from the situation in Vietnam and concludes that a way to end the issue is getting closer.