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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • August 07, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry to Wang Bingnan, 'An Analysis of the Third Meeting'

  • August 07, 1955

    Instructions from the PRC Foreign Ministry On the Issue of Chinese Students in the US at the Sino-US Ambassadorial Talks

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry instructed Wang Bingnan how to counter-argue when Americans objected China’s suggestions regarding release of Chinese students in the US.

  • August 07, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry to Wang Bingnan, 'Talking Points for the Fourth Meeting'

    Instructions from the PRC Foreign Ministry on how to handle the three Chinese proposals that had not been satisfied in the 3rd meeting: The request for a name list of all Chinese nationals in the US, the demand that the US revoke its restriction on the exit of Chinese nationals and students, the proposal that both sides entrust a third country to look after its nationals in the other country.

  • August 10, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry to Wang Bingnan, 'Talking Points for the Fifth Meeting'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry instructed Chinese Representative Wang Bingnan to have the following major agreements in writing on the fifth meeting: (1) Any nationals who were willing to return to their countries should be granted permission; (2) China designated India and the US designated the UK to facilitate the repatriation of each other’s nationals.

  • August 13, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry to Wang Bingnan, 'Possible Attitudes of the Other Party at the Sixth Meeting'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry instructed the Chinese delegation how to respond to different attitudes the US delegation might have in the next meeting.

  • August 15, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry to Wang Bingnan, 'Instructions and Text of Speeches at the Seventh Meeting'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry estimated the issues that the US would raise in the next meeting, including the wording in the agreement and whether to issue a joint statement or separated ones, and instructed Chinese Representative Wang Bingnan the proper responses.

  • August 18, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry to Wang Bingnan, 'Instructions a for the Eighth Meeting'

    The Foreign Ministry instructed that Wang to emphasize two points to be included in the agreement in the next meeting: (1) The Americans who had litigations in China should not be repatriated unconditionally; (2) Both governments were able to represent their own citizens to delegate the third party to arrange their repatriation and to investigate difficult cases, if any.

  • August 19, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry to Wang Bingnan, 'Instructions for the Ninth Meeting'

    The Foreign Ministry agreed with Wang’s observation that the US thought that China was very eager to reach an agreement and thus took advantage of it. The US’s purpose was to have China promise unambiguously that all American citizens would be released soon. The Foreign Ministry instructed Wang to stand firm in the next meeting and not to yield as China had already make necessary concession.

  • August 21, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry to Wang Bingnan, 'Agree for Wang to Accept the Invite from Johnson'

    The Foreign Ministry agreed Wang to accept the invite from Johnson and asked for more details about the dinner arrangement.

  • August 21, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'America's Probing of Us and Our Talking Points'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry claims that the US wants to test China’s bottom-line regarding the release of US citizens in China.

  • August 24, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Analysis of the Private Dinner and the 10th Meeting and Instructions for the 11th Meeting of the Sino-US Ambassadorial Talks'

    The Foreign Ministry instructed Wang that China would not have a determined time to release all the American citizens, as the US requested. However, China could agree to deal with the issue “as soon as possible” in the amendment.

  • August 26, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Agree to the Postponement of the 12th Meeting of the Sino-US Talks to the 31st of August'

    The Ministry of Foreign Affairs agreed the postponement of the twelfth meeting. The Ministry instructed Wang to invite Johnson to a private dinner immediately on receipt of this telegram.

  • August 28, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Instructions for Ambassador Wang'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry offers Ambassador Wang instructions for his upcoming dinner with U. Alexis Johnson.

  • August 30, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Instructions for the 12th Meeting of the Sino-US Ambassadorial Talks'

    The Foreign Ministry suspected that the US was trying to buy time using ridiculous excuses. China must prevent the US from doing so. The Ministry instructed Wang different responses to give in various scenarios, and asked Wang to change the word in the text “as soon as possible” to “expeditiously.”

  • September 05, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Instructions for the 13th Meeting of the Sino-US Ambassadorial Talks'

    According to the Ministry, it seemed that the US had agreed with the text of the agreement, and that the US was about to drop its emphasis on having China promise an exact time to release American civilians. The Ministry still instructed Wang to stand firm on China’s stance in case the US pressed the issue once again in the next meeting.

  • September 09, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Instructions for the 14th Meeting of the Sino-US Ambassadorial Talks'

    The Foreign Ministry's instructions regarding revising the draft, the preferred words, and the exchange of text and the information to release to the US after reaching an agreement.

  • October 08, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry to the Xinjiang Foreign Affairs Office, 'Can Pakistan Establish a Consulate in Kashgar?'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry asks officials in Xinjiang whether Pakistan should be allowed to open a consulate in Xinjiang.

  • September 18, 1956

    Summary of Conversation from Chairman Mao Zedong's Reception of the Indonesian Ambassador to China Soekardjo Wiriopranoto

    Mao Zedon and Amb. Wiriopranoto discuss Chinese-Indonesian relations, including dual citizenship of overseas Chinese in Indonesia, relations with Singapore, and prospects for a Japanese invasion.

  • November 02, 1956

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, ‘On Our Attitude towards Hungary’

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry says that "'much listening, little speaking' is necessary” with regards to the Hungarian Revolution.

  • April 10, 1957

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'The Premier's Discussion with the Indonesian Ambassadors on Convening the Second Afro-Asian Conference'

    In a meeting with the Indonesian ambassador, Zhou Enlai emphasized that it was important that many countries would attend the second Asian-African conference and that China wanted the conference to bolster solidarity rather than be a place for argument.