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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 04, 1963

    Meeting Minutes, Council of Ministers of the Netherlands, 'Discussion of NATO Nuclear Force'

    State Secretary of Foreign Affairs De Block, standing in for Minister Luns, presents his ministry’s paper on Dutch participation in talks regarding the MLF. The paper lays out the reasons for declining to participate so far, but argues that due to changes in the situation the Netherlands now should move to participate in the talks. Objections from the Ministers of Defense and Finance as well as concerns over resistance in parliament lead most of the discussion to be tabled until the following meeting.

  • October 09, 1963

    Memorandum, Dutch Joint Chiefs of Staff, 'Regarding the Military Desirability of the Creation of a NATO Multilateral Nuclear Force"

    Memorandum presented at 11 October 1963 meeting of the Dutch Council of Ministers. The memorandum is highly critical of the military merits of the proposed NATO Multilateral Nuclear Force, and argues that even if the MLF is created, the Netherlands should decline to participate.

  • October 11, 1963

    Meeting Minutes, Council of Ministers of the Netherlands, 'Dutch Participation in Multilateral Nuclear Force Talks'

    Minister of Defense De Jong presents a memorandum from his joint chiefs of staff, the tenor of which he supports, which serves as the basis for an extended discussion. The memorandum is highly critical of the (military) merits of the MLF, but De Jong takes care to bracket his critique as coming strictly from the point of view of the Ministry of Defense. De Jong stresses that neither troops nor financial means can be made available for participation in the MLF. State Secretary of Foreign Affairs De Block proposes the formula: “to take part in the discussions on the clear understanding that it does not commit them [the Dutch] to participate in such a force.” Prime Minister Marijnen brings up a number of counterarguments to both military arguments against and political arguments in favor of the MLF.

  • November 22, 1963

    Meeting Minutes, Council of Ministers of the Netherlands, 'Talks Regarding a Multilateral Nuclear Force'

    The Council accepts the proposal of Minister of Foreign Affairs Luns to inform the involved governments that the Netherlands is making preparations for participation in the Multilateral Force talks. The Ministers of Defense and Finance object that the existing defense budget and conventional forces ought not to be slighted as a result.

  • 1964

    Report, 'Note on the views of the Dutch Government on disarmament'

    The Dutch government contends that an agreement on general and complete disarmament must be proceeded under the existing balance of power

  • 1964

    Note on the Views of the Dutch Government on Disarmament

    The Dutch government supports a general and complete disarmament agreement under international control, but such agreement should not disturb the balance of power.

  • February 14, 1964

    Meeting Minutes, Council of Ministers of the Netherlands, 'Multilateral Nuclear Force'

    The Council decides to participate in the NATO Multilateral Force test ship (the Mixed-Manning Demonstration, or MMD). Among the arguments that persuade the Minister of Defense is the danger of shifting the center of gravity to the German Federal Republic and the concomitant risk of giving Russia the impression that the whole project is a guise for providing the Germans with nuclear weapons.

  • March 04, 1964

    S. A. Levin, L.R. Powers, and E. Von Halle, Union Carbide Corporation Nuclear Division, 'Nth Power Evaluation'

    Union Carbide Nuclear Company updates their previous study on the ease with which other nations could secretly create nuclear weapon facilities using the gas centrifuge.

  • June 19, 1964

    Meeting Minutes, Council of Ministers of the Netherlands, 'Multilateral Nuclear Force'

    Minister of Foreign Affairs Luns reports that the Secretary of State Rusk has asked him to explain the American position regarding the Multilateral Force (MLF) to Prime Minister Khrushchev on his impending visit to Russia. The main point is that the MLF is not intended to give Germany control over nuclear weapons.

  • October 30, 1964

    Meeting Minutes, Council of Ministers of the Netherlands, 'Foreign Policy'

    The Council discusses the attitude of the French government regarding the negotiations about a common grain price and the Kennedy Round, which impact considerations regarding the desirability of the Multilateral Force (MLF). In the discussion of the MLF itself, it is increasingly clear that the position of the French and how the other states will deal with it are crucial for the project’s prospects. On the one hand it seems the Americans will push the MLF through regardless, but on the other hand the initiative seems to have lost some of its urgency. The Americans have signaled to the Dutch their irritation with the attitude of the French.

  • November 13, 1964

    Meeting Minutes, Council of Ministers of the Netherlands, 'Foreign Policy'

    Council of Ministers minutes reports that Minister of Foreign Affairs has met with U.S. Secretary of State Rusk, who was determined to secure Dutch and British participation in the Multilateral Force. The French increase their resisitance to the plan, while anti-German sentiment increases in France.

  • December 04, 1964

    Meeting Minutes, Council of Ministers of the Netherlands, 'European Political Cooperation'

    Minister of Foreign Affairs Luns reports on a discussion he had with Jean Monnet on the EEC and the Multilateral Force (MLF), including topics such as the interconnection between these issues, the risk of a German nuclear force, and transatlantic relations in general. Luns also met with Undersecretary of State Ball, who was keen on moving ahead with the MLF and proposed holding a conference about it in The Hague, which Luns had to decline. Luns furthermore met with Minister of Foreign Affairs Couve de Murville, who put the blame with the Americans for inciting thoughts about nuclear independence on the part of the Germans. Minister of Defense De Jong responds by giving a broad military-strategic analysis, concluding that unity within NATO is essential to prevent American attention from shifting increasingly to Asia.

  • August 17, 1965

    Letter from Dutch Envoy in Bucharest to Minister of Foreign Affairs, 'Invitation for reception in honor of North Korean National Day'

    The Envoy has received a North Korean invitation which he did not respond to; only the Greek Ambassador received this invitation as well.

  • September 17, 1965

    Letter from Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs to Special Envoy in Bucharest, 'Relationship Netherlands-North Korea'

    The chief of the Bureau for East Asia and Pacific responds to the Envoy's concerns regarding North Korea by noting that other diplomats have also been courted by North Korean representatives.

  • January 13, 1967

    Transcript of Reception by Comrade Nicolae Ceausescu of the Foreign Minister of Holland, Joseph Luns

    This document is the transcript of a conversation between Joseph Luns, Foreign Minister to Holland, and Nicolae Ceausescu, in which the two leaders discuss the Vietnam War and the suggested reasons that the United States is reluctant to withdraw from the conflict.

  • January 13, 1967

    Transcript of Reception by Comrade Ion Gheorghe Maurer of the Foreign Minister of Holland, Joseph Luns

    This document is a transcript of the meeting between Ion Gheorghe Maurer and Joseph Luns, the Foreign Minister of Holland, during which they discuss the situation in Germany and the Vietnam War, and their effects on foreign relations with the Soviet Union and the United States.

  • May 17, 1967

    Telegram from Dutch Embassy in Warsaw to Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Regarding North Korean Ambassador's Request to Meet

    Dutch representative Calkoen informs the Ministry of a request by the North Korean Ambassador to meet with him and other Embassy officials and proposes to ignore it.

  • May 19, 1967

    Internal Memorandum of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Contacts with North Korean Ambassador in Warsaw'

    A brief note stating that Calkoen's conduct (not taking up the North Korean Ambassador's offer) is in line with Dutch policy concerning states it does not recognize.

  • May 24, 1967

    Telegram from Dutch Embassy in Warsaw to Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Regarding North Korean Ambassador's Request to Meet

    Brief telegram from Calkoen requesting instructions on how to respond to the North Korean Ambassador's request to meet, after North Korean 3rd Embassy Secretary inquired by telephone.

  • May 26, 1967

    Telegram from Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs to Embassy in Warsaw, 'Request for meeting by North Korean Ambassador'

    Minister of Foreign Affairs Luns replies that Calkoen should respond to the request with the refusal as phrased in Calkoen's 19 May telegram.