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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 12, 1945

    TASS Digest, 'The Mexican Press about Byrnes' Statement; etc.'

    Excerpts from articles on James Byrnes, General Mark W. Clark, Clement Attlee, and US refusal to share technical information about the atomic bomb.

  • February 22, 1946

    George Kennan's 'Long Telegram'

    Ambassador George F. Kennan writes to the Secretary of State with a lengthy analysis of Soviet policy in an attempt to explain their recent uncooperative behavior. This message would later become famous as the "long telegram."

  • March 05, 1946

    Churchhill's "Iron Curtain" Speech, "Sinews of Peace"

    Text of speech given by Churchill at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri in which he first used the phrase "iron curtain."

  • May 06, 1946

    From the Diary of V.M. Molotov, Reception of the Chinese Ambassador to France, Jing Tai, on 6 May 1946 at 3:00 p.m. in the Soviet Embassy in Paris

    The conversation is concerning the "German question" in terms of the conditions and aftermath of the surrender. PR China sees the negotiation on Germany as becoming an agreement that might apply similar to the question on the Japanese surrender. For this reason Jing Tai asks Molotov to allow China to take part in the negotiations on Germany. The trials of Japanese war criminals were also discussed.

  • August 06, 1946

    Talk with the American Correspondent Anna Louise Strong

    Mao Zedong says that "all reactionaries are paper tigers" and discusses the Chinese Civil War. He also introduces the theory of the "intermediate zone," when he states that "the United States and the Soviet Union are separated by a vast zone which includes many capitalist, colonial and semi-colonial countries in Europe, Asia and Africa."

  • September 27, 1946

    Telegram from Nikolai Novikov, Soviet Ambassador to the US, to the Soviet Leadership

    Soviet Ambassador to the US, Nikolai Novikov, describes the advent of a more assertive US foreign policy. Novikov cautions the Soviet leadership that the Truman administration is bent on imposing US political, military and economic domination around the world. This telegram has, since its discovery in the Russian archives, been labelled the Soviet equivalent of US Ambassador to the Soviet Union George Kennan's "Long telegram."

  • November 07, 1946

    Cable No. 198, Molotov to Druzhkov [Stalin]

    A cable discussing the Soviet proposal for arms reduction and the American reaction to the proposal. Molotov proposes adding a fifth point to their original proposal: the creation, via the Security Council, of an institute for international control.

  • November 20, 1946

    Cable No. 641, Dekanozov to Cde. Stalin

    Dekanozov relates a conversation with Ambassador Smith, who indicated that President Truman was interested in control over nuclear energy. Smith would like to meet with Stalin when he returns from Sochi.

  • December 02, 1946

    Cable Nos. 509-511, Molotov to Druzhkov [Stalin]

    A copy of the draft resolution submitted by the United States to the UN, regarding arms reduction. Molotov thinks that this draft may be taken as a basis with the introduction of some changes he plans to report at a later time.

  • December 02, 1946

    Cable Nos. 512-515, Molotov to Druzhkov [Stalin]

    An outline of the Soviet Union's proposed changes to the USA's draft proposal for arms reduction (submitted to the UN).

  • December 03, 1946

    Incoming Cable No. 2209, Druzhkov [Stalin] to Cde. Molotov

    Stalin approves of the American draft for arms control as a basis, but instructs Molotov to insist on specific wording for certain points. He also does not recommend introducing any addendums as he believes they will fail.

  • December 19, 1946

    Telegram, Gromyko to Cde. Dekanozov

    A copy of a report to be submitted to the Security Council, detailing a commission's conclusions and recommendations for future control of atomic energy.

  • December 21, 1946

    Interview Transcript of Stalin's Interview With Elliot Roosevelt

    Roosevelt conducts an interview with Stalin and discusses US-Soviet relations and problems facing the post-war world.

  • June 05, 1947

    The Marshall Plan, Speech by US Secretary of State George C. Marshall

    Speech in which George C. Marshall lays out the "Marshall Plan" for US aid to assist in the re-building of post-war Europe.

  • September 04, 1947

    Letter, V.M. Molotov to George C. Marshall

    Molotov blames the Americans for the failure of the US-Soviet Joint Commission on Korea and rejects the latest proposals put forth by Robert A. Lovett.

  • October 17, 1947

    Letter, Robert A. Lovett to V.M. Molotov

    Responding to Molotov's letter about Korea dated September 4, Lovett writes that the US will refer the Korean issue to the United Nations and forego further bilateral discussions with the USSR.

  • October 17, 1947

    George C. Marshall, 'A Program for a More Effective United Nations: Address by the Chief of the U.S. Delegation to the General Assembly'

    Marshall speaks about Greece, Palestine, and Korea, as well as the international control of atomic energy and the role and structure of the United Nations.

  • September 18, 1947

    Text of Speech Delivered by A.Y. Vyshinsky at the General Assembly of the United Nations, September 18, 1947

    The Soviet Union's response to George Marshall's September 17, 1947, speech at the UNGA. Vyshinsky offers the Soviet Union's position on arms control, nuclear weapons, the UN, Korea, Greece, and other issues raised by Marshall

  • October 20, 1947

    Ciphered Telegram, Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    Molotov relates how the Americans have rejected the Soviet position toward establishing a temporary all Korean assembly. While there is some overlap between both positions, this issue has now been exacerbated by Marshall's move to decide it in the UNGA. The Soviets should respond to this move by reiterating their commitment to a self-determined form of government for Korea, which requires the Soviets and Americans to withdraw their troops.

  • September 20, 1947

    Report of Pham No Mach [Pham Ngoc Thach] to the Soviet Envoy in Switzerland, A. G. Kulazhenkov

    Report of a meeting with an emissary of the Viet Minh government who requested Soviet support for Vietnamese forces in their independence war against the French. Pham Ngoc Thach stresses the communist nature of the Republic of Vietnam's government, explaining that the Communist Party was only dissolved in 1945 "to avoid provoking a negative American reaction." Pham also discusses his meetings with the French Communist Party in Paris, and the situation in other Southeast Asian countries, including Malay, Indonesia and Thailand.