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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • December 08, 1950

    Letter from Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong, Liu Shaoqi, Zhu De, and Chen Yun

    Zhou Enlai reports on Soviet replies to telegrams from the Chinese side.

  • December 08, 1950

    Telegram from the Chinese Communist Party Central Committee to Wu Xiuquan and Qiao Guanhua

    The CCP Central Committee gives instructions to the Chinese representatives to the UN on how to reply to confrontation over the Korean issue. The Chinese representatives are to express willingness to end military action as well as desire to know the UN and the U.S.'s positions on the conditions for an armistice.

  • December 13, 1950

    Telegram from Zhou Enlai to Wu Xiuquan and Qiao Guanhua

    Zhou Enlai expresses that China is the most interested in the opinion of the U.S. and the UN regarding the conditions for an armistice on the Korean peninsula, and makes clear that the 38th parallel is no longer in existence.

  • December 16, 1950

    Telegram from Zhou Enlai to Wu Xiuquan and Qiao Guanhua

    Zhou Enlai advises the Chinese UN representatives on how to explain and respond to representatives from other countries regarding the Korea issue and the proposed armistice.

  • January 29, 1951

    Telegram from Mao Zedong to I.V. Stalin, conveying 28 January 1951 telegram from Mao Zedong to Peng Dehuai

    A forward to Stalin of a message sent earlier by Mao to Peng Dehuai. It outlines operational plans for the PLA and KPA in and around Seoul and talks about the need to gain an advantageous military position with negotiations in mind.

  • May 06, 1951

    Memorandum of Conversation, Soviet Ambassador N. V. Roshchin with CC CCP Secretary Liu Shaoqi

    Conversation between Soviet Ambassador to the PRC Roshchin and Liu Shaoqi regarding the Guomindang (Kuomintang) and American intervention in Korea, and the question of Chinese relations with Tibet.

  • June 07, 1951

    Ciphered Telegram No. 3446, Filippov [Stalin] to Krasovsky, for Cde. Mao Zedong

    Telegram from Stalin telling Mao that he is ready to receive Gao Gang and Kim Il Sung.

  • June 13, 1951

    Ciphered Telegram No. 3559, Filippov [Stalin] to Krasovsky

    A telegram from Stalin to Krasovsky berating him for training the Chinese pilots too slowly.

  • July 03, 1951

    Ciphered Telegram No. 2950, Filippov [Stalin] to Krasovsky, for Cde. Mao Zedong

    Stalin sends his advice on peace negotiations to Mao, as requested by Mao’s telegram of the same day.

  • July 03, 1951

    Ciphered Telegram No. 21412, Mao Zedong to Filippov [Stalin]

    The included telegram from Mao to Peng, Gao, and Kim gives Mao’s military instructions for the upcoming peace negotiations.

  • July 16, 1951

    Ciphered Telegram from Mao Zedong to Filippov [Stalin], Transmitting Li Kenong's Telegram in Mao's Name

    Li Kenong's telegram discusses the neutral zone, troop retreats, and other terms of the armistice.

  • July 20, 1951

    Ciphered Telegram from Mao Zedong to Filippov [Stalin]

    Telegram from Mao to Stalin discussing the points of agreement and disagreement between the Korean-Chinese and Anglo-American representatives of armistice negotiations.

  • July 21, 1951

    List of Questions from Ambassador Alan G. Kirk During a Conversation with Gromyko

    Kirk's questions clarified the extent to which the Soviet government is committed to a peaceful resolution in Korea.

  • July 27, 1951

    From the Diary of N. V. Roshchin: Memorandum of Conversation with Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai on 24 July 1951

    Discussion between Soviet Ambassador to the PRC Roshchin and Zhou Enlai regarding the conflict in Korea. Zhou states that the war effort is a drain on China's domestic economy, but that it will bounce back once the war is won. Also describes Chinese relations with capitalist countries. Notes that the CCP lacks technical specialists of any sort.

  • August 13, 1951

    Ciphered Telegram No. 22834, Mao Zedong to Cde. Filippov [Stalin]

    Telegram from Mao to Stalin relaying the assessment of Li Kenong of the state of the ongoing armistice talks. He states that the US is unwilling the accept the 38th parallel as the demaracation line and that given the state of North Korean forces, they should consider make concessions to American demands in this regard in the interests of ceasing hostilities.

  • August 30, 1951

    Ciphered Telegram No. 23397, Mao Zedong to Filippov [Stalin]

    Telegram from Mao to Stalin agreeing with the latter's assessment of the inadvisability of having neutral observers, at the present time, at the armistice talks.

  • September 03, 1951

    Zhou Enlai’s Speech to the Central People’s Government Council, 'The Korean Ceasefire Negotiations and Making Peace with Japan'

    Speech by Zhou Enlai emphasizing the need to remain steadfast during negotiations with America on the Korean issue, in order to assure that the treaty is favorable to China and Korea. Notes that aiding Korea and resisting the United States is the only way to prevent Western dominance of East Asia.

  • September 10, 1951

    Ciphered Telegram, Filippov [Stalin] to Mao Zedong

    Telegram from Stalin to Mao agreeing to send the military advisors requested by Mao. He also asks whether General Zakharov would be suitable as the main military adviser for the staff.

  • October 31, 1951

    Cable No. 25407, Mao Zedong to Cde. Filippov [Stalin]

    Mao reports to Stalin on the deliver of a message from Kim Il Sung, discussing guidelines for conducting negotiations.

  • April 05, 1952

    Record of the Conversation of I.V. Stalin and Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan

    Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan and Stalin discuss India's internal politics and stance on foreign policy. Radhakrishnan tells Stalin of India's recent elections and emphasizes that India shares the Soviet Union's stance against capitalism. Radhakrishna also puts forth the question of peaceful co-existence between capitalist and communist spheres, and the possibility for a neutral commission to replace the Cominform and UN. Stalin expresses doubt.