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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 30, 1977

    Draft letter and Aide Memoire from South African Foreign Minister R.F. Botha to US Secretary of State Cyrus Vance

    South African Foreign Minister R.F. Botha writes to the US Secretary of State disputing accusations that South Africa is developing nuclear weapons.

  • October, 1977

    Letter from South African Prime Minister Vorster to US President Carter on US-South Africa Relations

    South African Prime Minister Vorster denies the existence of a South African nuclear program and lists hostile steps taken by the United States to exclude South Africa from international nuclear and atomic energy groups. He concludes that "it would seem... the United States officially holds the view that stability in Southern Africa and the future of our country is to be sacrificed in the hope of stopping Soviet expansionism."

  • October 24, 1977

    Telegram from South African Embassy in Washington to South African Secretary for Foreign Affairs Brand Fourie on South African Assurances to the US on its Nuclear Intentions

    The South African Embassy in Washington reports on assurances to the US on South Africa's nuclear intentions

  • October 25, 1977

    Telegram from UK Embassy in Pretoria to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, 'South Africa's Nuclear Intentions'

    UK Embassy in Pretoria reports on South African President Vorster’s remarks on nuclear matters to ABC television.

  • December 12, 1977

    Cable, South African Department of Foreign Affairs, Regarding US Arms Embargo on South Africa

    Cable states that the US is broadening its embargo on South African arms deals to make it more extensive than the UN embargo.

  • January 06, 1978

    Letter, M. E. Haworth, Jr., Hayes Corporation, Regarding C130 Equipment

    Mr. Haworth, on behalf of the Hayes Corporation, writes to Ambassador Donald Sole explaining why Hayes is withholding its delivery of C130 equipment to the Republic of South Africa.

  • January 26, 1978

    Letter, South African Ambassador to the United States, 'C. 130 [Aircraft] Spares'

    The South African Ambassador to the United States writes to the Secretary for Foreign Affairs regarding South Africa's desire to purchase certain' rangefire kits' for their C. 130 aircraft.

  • January 26, 1978

    Letter, South African Ambassador to the United States, to the Hayes Corporation

    Jeremy Shearer writes to the Vice President of the Hayes Corporation in regards to a shipment of kits for C130 South African military aircraft that was withheld from the South African Government. Mr. Shearer believes this to be a breach of contract.

  • February 14, 1978

    Memo, South African Department of Foreign Affairs, 'Kits for C130's [Aircraft]'

    Memo regarding South African C130 Aircrafts.

  • July, 1978

    Interagency Intelligence Memorandum, US Director of Central Intelligence, 'South Africa’s Nuclear Options and Decisionmaking Structure'

    Memo reports that during the period the Carter administration was putting pressure on South Africa to avoid the nuclear weapons route, but the analysts suggested that even if the South Africans signed the NPT and accepted IEAE safeguards they would continue to pursue a “covert program.”

  • September, 1978

    Report, Centre Against Apartheid, 'US Arms Transfers to South Africa in Violation of the United Nations Voluntary Arms Embargo: 1963-1977'

    Centre Against Apartheid report on US violations on the South African Arms Embargo.

  • September 28, 1978

    South African Department of Foreign Affairs, United States Arms Transfers to South Africa in Violation of the United Nations Voluntary Arms Embargo

    Letter from the South African Acting Permanent Representative to the United Nations in New York to the Secretary of Foreign Affairs in Pretoria regarding arms transfers to South Africaduring the UN arms embargo.

  • November 30, 1978

    Report on South African-American Talks held in Washington on 20, 21, and 22 November 1978 in connection with the "Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act, 1978" (NNPA)

  • December 06, 1978

    Matters Arising from the South African-American Talks held in Washington on 20, 21 and 22 November 1978 in connection with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act, 1978 (NNPA)

  • March, 1981

    South African Department of Foreign Affairs, 'Directive for Discussions of Nuclear Matters with United States Authorities'

    A memorandum in advance of a meeting between U.S. and South African policymakers which outlines South Africa’s intention to adhere to the principles and spirit of the NPT, and concerns about the supply of fuel for the Koeberg and SAFARI-1 reactors

  • March 04, 1981

    Telegram from South African Ambassador in Washington Donald Sole on Prospective Reagan Administration Non-Proliferation Policy

    South African Ambassador Donald Sole reports on the possible effect of Reagan non-proliferation policy on South African/US nuclear relations.

  • March 20, 1981

    Report, South African Department of Foreign Affairs, 'South African-United States' Nuclear Relations'

    Background on US-South African nuclear relations and uranium cooperation from the end of the Second World War to the early 1980s. Also addressed is the Vela incident of September 1979 and the international community’s backlash against the South African government.

  • April 09, 1981

    Special Assistant for NPI, NFAC, CIA, to Resource Management Staff, Office of Program Assessment et al, 'Request for Review of Draft Paper on the Security Dimension of Non-Proliferation'

    Just a few months into President Reagan’s first term his administration wanted to make its own mark on nonproliferation policy. The report suggests building “broader bilateral relationship[s]” and offering political and security incentives could persuade states considering developing nuclear weapons to cease these efforts.

  • April 15, 1981

    Memorandum of Conversation Between R. F. Botha and Chester Crocker of the US Department of State

    Leaked memorandum of conversation between "Pik" Botha and Chester Crocker. Botha questions how much South Africa can trust the United States to support the former in Namibia negotiations. He also raises concerns about the effects that a SWAPO victory in Namibia could have. Crocker reassures him on both subjects, based on the strength and resistance to pressure of the Reagan administration.

  • May 15, 1981

    Notes on Meeting between South African Minister of Foreign Affairs R. F. Botha and US President Reagan

    South African Minister of Foreign Affairs "Pik" Botha and President Reagan meet in Washington, DC. South African Ambassador Sole, the note taker, interprets Reagan's friendly opening comments as "the inference clearly being that he had no illusions about democratic rule in Africa." They discuss the situation in Namibia and Angola, and their shared opposition to Soviet and communist influence in the region. Botha also asks Reagan to help South Africa's souring relations with France regarding nuclear cooperation. Botha states that "South Africa was not preparing or intending to explode a nuclear device, but[...] could not afford publicly to surrender this option."