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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 07, 1966

    Note of Conversation between Foreign Minister of the Socialist Republic of Romania Corneliu Manescu and United States Permanent Representative to the UN Arthur Goldberg

    Following a Romanian delegation to the 21st Session of the UN General Assembly, the Romanian Foreign Minister summarizes discussions between the Romanian delegation and Arthur Goldberg, US permanent representative to the UN.

  • October 10, 1966

    Note of Conversation between Foreign Minister of the Socialist Republic of Romania Corneliu Manescu and Foreign Minister of the USSR A. A. Gromyko

    Following a Romanian delegation to the 21st Session of the UN General Assembly, the Romanian Foreign Minister summarizes discussions between the Romanian delegation and A. A. Gromyko, USSR Minister of Foreign Affairs.

  • October 12, 1966

    Note of Conversation between Foreign Minister of the Socialist Republic of Romania Corneliu Manescu and United States Secretary of State Dean Rusk

    Following a Romanian delegation to the 21st Session of the UN General Assembly, the Romanian Foreign Minister summarizes discussions between the Romanian delegation and Dean Rusk, US Secretary of State.

  • January 04, 1967

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in Romania to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Romania seeks to construct electric power plant, with aid of Great Britain, as part of a 10-year electrification plan.

  • May 22, 1968

    KGB Border Report to P. Shelest

    Report on lax border controls between Warsaw Pact nations and the Western District, USSR.

  • August 28, 1968

    Cryptogram No 10456 from Polish Embassy in Bucharest, Ambassador Ochęduszko's Meeting with the Soviet Ambassador

    Polish Ambassador Ochęduszko reports on a conversation with the Soviet ambassador in Bucharest, Alexander Vasilievich Basov. Basov informed him about a conversation he had with Nicolae Ceaușescu on August 25 in which Basov complained about Romanian press which criticized the Soviet intervention in Czechoslovakia. Ceausescu continued to insist that military intervention was a mistake.

  • July 14, 1970

    Cryptogram No 7067 from Polish Embassy in Moscow, Wording of Soviet-Romanian Agreement

    The Polish Embassy in Moscow reports about changes to the wording of a Soviet-Romanian agreement, which "lacks wording referring to the obligations of the parties to take steps to defend the gains of the socialist economic integration, expansion of direct cooperation between the state and social organizations / and of course the problem of Munich."

  • January 11, 1971

    Report, Polish Embassy in Bucharest, 'Romania After the Agreements on Friendship with the Soviet Union, Poland and Bulgaria'

    The Polish Embassy in Romania reports on trends in Romanian foreign relations. There are signs of rapprochement with the other socialist countries in the Warsaw Pact after Romania reversed course to join Comecon. Yet Ceaușescu continued to court China and the United States as well.

  • June 25, 1971

    Minutes of the Romanian Politburo Meeting Concerning Nicolae Ceauşescu's Visit to China, North Korea, Mongolia, and Vietnam

    These are the minutes of a meeting of the Central Committee of the Romanian Communist Party discussing Romanian leader Nicolae Ceauşescu's 1971 visit to China. Ceauşescu reports on his visits to Chinese enterprises, universities, and laboratories, and acknowledges the achievements of the Cultural Revolution. The report on China is followed by comments on his subsequent visits to North Korea, Vietnam, and Mongolia. Finally, the discussion turns to Moscow's criticism of Ceauşescu's anti-Soviet statements during his stay in the Middle East.

  • August 04, 1971

    Minutes of the Joint Meeting of the Central Committee and the Ministers’ Council

    These notes discuss foreign policy issues related to China, Hungary, the Soviet Union, and Romania. To quote the document itself, it "was a bilateral discussion of the internal situation of fraternal Parties and countries, and later an exchange of opinion on contemporary foreign policy questions and the problems of the international workers’ movement."

  • November 06, 1971

    Polish Embassy in Bucharest, 'Memorandum Regarding Romania's Relations with the European Socialist Countries After Ceaușescu's Visit to Beijing'

    The Polish Ambassador reports that Ceausescu's visit to China had chilled relations with the countries of the Warsaw Pact. The report then discusses Romanians relations with the Soviet Union and Hungary in more depth.

  • February 01, 1972

    Cryptogram No 1144 from Polish Embassy in Bucharest, Romania Strengthening Relations with the Soviet Union

    The Polish Embassy in Romania reports on signs that Romania is serious about improving relations with the Soviet Union, including signing agreements to join Comecon and put the Romanian army under joint command of the Warsaw Pact.

  • September 02, 1972

    Cryptogram No 9517 from Polish Embassy in Bucharest, Romania Moves Closer to the Soviet Union and the Socialist Countries

    The Polish Embassy in Bucharest reports on improved relations between Romania and the Soviet Union and Czechoslovakia, motivated in part by economic reasons.

  • August 10, 1973

    Intelligence Note, Polish Embassy in Bucharest, 'Regarding Soviet-Romanian Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance'

    The Polish Embassy in Romania reports on the changed text to the updated Soviet-Romanaian treaty. The main differences were the exclusion of references to West Germany, the Warsaw Pact, and obligations of mutual military assistance.

  • 1974

    Analysis of the Romanian Attitude toward Maoism

    This document offers an East German assessment of Romania's attitude towards China. It emphasizes that the Romanian Communist Party approves of the Chinese Maoist line and agrees with Beijing's domestic and foreign policies. Romania's foreign policy is said to attribute the same importance to relations with China as to relations with the Soviet Union. It also notes that the Romanian government has given more publicity to the resumption of diplomatic relations between China and West Germany than it did to similar moves between East Germany and India. The authors identify an anti-Soviet bias in the Romanian position, which the authors believe undermines the unity of the Socialist countries.

  • June 05, 1974

    Intelligence Note, Polish Embassy in Bucharest, 'Concerning Romanian-Sino Relations'

    Detailed Polish report on Romanian relations with China.

  • August 12, 1975

    Intelligence Note, Polish Embassy in Bucharest, 'Concerning the Course and Results of the Visit of US President G. Ford in Romania'

    Detailed analysis of the visit of President Gerald Ford to Bucharest on August 2-3, 1975. In addition to the formal analysis of the official materials, the authors of the report tried to find other sources of information, which resulted in the statement that "we have information that Ceaușescu was an advocate rapid normalization of US-Cuban relations." Much attention was also devoted to the Romanian leader's attempts of mediation in various places around the world, including the Middle East. The report also contains rumors, which, according to the authors of the report, were "‘leaked’ by American diplomats around here" that Ceaușescu stressed the importance of the future of Yugoslavia after Tito's death, which he expected soon (in fact, he died in 1980, five years after the meeting)

  • September 06, 1975

    Note regarding the Meeting between Ilie Verdeț and Ji Denggui

    Ji Denggui and Ilie Verdeț discuss bilateral relations between China and Romania, nuclear proliferation and diarmament, Soviet-American relations, Comecon, European security, US policy toward Taiwan, Japan-Soviet relations, and economic development in China and Romania, among other topics.

  • October 15, 1975

    Intelligence Note, Polish Embassy in Bucharest, 'Regarding Revival of Relations Between Romania and the PRC'

    The Polish Embassy in Bucharest reports on increasing high level meetings between Romanian and Chinese officials. In their analysis, "Romanians intend to ease discontent, that has clearly appeared on the Chinese side and consistently implement the principle of balancing political relations with the Soviet Union, China and other socialist countries – to make the situation more stable."

  • November 12, 1975

    Cryptogram No 1982/IV from Polish Embassy in Bucharest, Conversation with Ambassador Drezdenko on Romania

    Report on a conversation with Soviet Ambassador Drezdenko on Romanian politician [Ștefan] Andrei's visit to Moscow. Romania wanted increased trade with the Soviet Union.