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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • April 04, 1962

    Soviet Report on Cuban Proposal to Establish a Soviet Intelligence Center in Cuba

    Report on a conversation between the Cuban Minister of Internal Affairs Ramiro Valdez Menendez and the KGB representative in Havana regarding the former's trip to the Soviet Union. The discussion concerns a Cuban proposal to set up a Soviet intelligence center in the country, which the Soviets turned down.

  • April 13, 1962

    From the Journal of S.M. Kudryavtsev, 'Record of Conversation with Fidel Castro Ruz, Prime Minister of the Republic of Cuba, 22 March 1962'

    Chomon is appointed Minister of Communications, and Inchaustegui's report is corroborated.

  • April 13, 1962

    From the Journal of S.M. Kudryavtsev, 'Record of Conversation with Fidel Castro Ruz, Prime Minister of the Republic of Cuba, 16 March 1962'

    Kudryavtsev and Castro discuss diplomatic normalization between the USSR and Ecuador and a CPSU CC letter directed at restoring global unity of the Communist movement, and a report from Inchaustegui suggests renewed US attacks against Cuba.

  • May 24, 1962

    Untitled Notes on the Back of the 24 May 1962 Memorandum from the General Staff to Khrushchev

    Notes from meeting of the Presidium during which Soviet leadership decides to send a commission to Cuba and chooses those who go.

  • May 24, 1962

    R. Malinovsky and M. Zakharov, Memorandum on Deployment of Soviet Forces to Cuba

    Zakharov and Malinovsky send to Khrushchev the Ministry of Defense’s proposal to send troops and supplies to Cuba. Zakharov and Malinovsky give further detail as to the nature of material to be sent to Cuba and a timetable for building launch pads and assembling missiles.

  • June 20, 1962

    List of Troops and Commanders to take part in Operation "Anadyr"

    A description of the staff and crew of the Soviet Operation "Anadyr."

  • July 12, 1962

    Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Presidium Protocol 41

    Protocol 41 details a meeting on a group of economic advisers sent to Cuba from the Soviet Union.

  • July 13, 1962

    Secret Agreement July 13, 1962

    Agreement with annexes between Cuba and the USSR. A memo from the USSR Council of Ministers allowing negotiations, and the signing of the protocol regarding special materials for the agreement between the USSR and Cuba.

  • August 23, 1962

    Soviet Report on American Attempts at Disseminating Fabricated News on Cuba

    Report on the American effort to spread false rumors about the arrival of Soviet military equipments and personnel in Cuba. To counter this subversive attempt, the Cuban security organs has established full control of foreign correspondence and captured maps and intelligence reports.

  • September 06, 1962

    Memorandum from R. Malinovsky to N.S. Khrushchev, 6 September 1962

    Malinovsky informs Khrushchev of the details regarding transport of missiles to Cuba and about reinforcing Cuba by air and adding to the troops already present.

  • September 07, 1962

    Telegram of Soviet Ambassador to Cuba A.I. Alekseev to the USSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    Alekseev sends a report on the nature of anti-Cuban propaganda and actions taken by the American government in United States and Latin America

  • September 08, 1962

    Memorandum, Malinovsky and Zakharov to Commander of Group of Soviet Forces in Cuba

    Malinovsky and Zakharov instruct the Commander of Soviet forces in Cuba on how to deploy navy, missile and air forces.

  • September 11, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to Cuba Alekseev to the USSR MFA

    Alekseev reports on a conversation with Raul Castro where Castro reinforces the strength of the Soviet-Cuban relationship.

  • September 14, 1962

    M. Zakharov and S. P. Ivanov to N.S. Khrushchev

    Zakharov and Ivanov report to Khrushchev the extent of US surveillance in Cuba and request extra fortifications for Soviet ships in Cuban waters.

  • September 22, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 22 September 1962

    Jelen compiles this report from his conversation with the USSR Ambassador [Aleksandr] Alekseyev. Alekseyev believes that the Soviet declaration from the 11th removed the danger of more serious [US] military action [against Cuba]. At the same time, he takes into account the possibility of the attempts of staging subversive landings, as well as the possibility of activities [carried out] by Cuban emigrant pirates against the ships. The two also discuss economic aid to Cuba, especially in the form of foodstuffs.

  • October 05, 1962

    Handwritten Note for the Record by Colonel General S.P. Ivanov

    Ivanov takes notes on a conversation with Khrushchev regarding the progress of weapons en route to Cuba.

  • October 15, 1962

    Cable from USSR Ambassador to the USA A.F. Dobrynin to Soviet Foreign Ministry

    Dobrynin reports confidential intelligence of "piratic raids by the so-called 'Alpha 66' group on the Cuban coast and on several vessels near Cuba are being carried out not from a base on the American mainland, but rather directly from the sea, from American landing ships carrying the corresponding cutters."

  • October 16, 1962

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Görög), Report on Cuban President Dorticos’ Trip to New York

    Chargé d’Affaires ad Interim Erzsébet Görög reports on Cuban President Dorticos’s trip to New York and speak at the United Nations. Görög opens her report describing the Cuban delegations travel from Havana to New York—she adds that the confusion may have been planned for political purposes. Görög records her impressions of Dorticos’s speech and the Cuban public’s receipt of the Cuban delegation upon return.

  • October 18, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak), 18 October 1962

    Drozniak discusses the possibility of US military action against Cuba, as well as Cuba's foreign relations with the USSR and the US.

  • October 18, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak), 18 October 1962

    Drozniak forwards a report from US Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-American Affairs [Edwin M.] Martin. Martin says that the Americans are well-informed of the military situation in Cuba, that Cuba does not possess nuclear weapons (nor will they be likely to because the USSR did not give such weapons to China, so why would they give them to Cuba?), that the level of the Cuban economy is twenty-five percent lower than the period before Fidel Castro came to power and Cuba is much more economically dependent on the USSR, and finally that any military invasion or complete blockade of Cuba would be considered an act of war by the USSR.