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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • January 17, 1962

    Polish Embassy, Rio de Janeiro (Chabasinski), to Polish Foreign Ministry

    Telegram describing conversation between Ambassador Chabasinski and US Ambassador Gordan regarding the United States' relations with Cuba.

  • January 27, 1962

    From the Journal of S.M. Kudryavtsev, 'Record of Conversation with Fidel Castro Ruz, Prime Minister of the Republic of Cuba, 3 January 1962'

    Fidel Castro expresses concern regarding US pressure on Latin American countries to isolate Cuba at an upcoming OAS conference.

  • January 28, 1962

    From the Journal of S.M. Kudryavtsev, 'Record of a Conversation with Prime Minister of the Republic of Cuba Fidel Castro Ruz, 30 December 1961'

    Kudryavstev and Fidel Castro discuss US intervention in Cuba and the positions of other OAS countries on supporting US interventionism in the wake of the upcoming OAS conference of ministers of foreign affairs.

  • February 21, 1962

    Report to the Soviet Minister of Defense and Minister of Foreign Affairs

    Message reporting the American plan to overthrow the Castro government.

  • February 28, 1962

    From the Journal of S.M. Kudryavtsev, 'Record of a Conversation with Fidel Castro Ruz, Prime Minister of the Republic of Cuba, 10 February 1962'

    Kudryavtsev describes a meeting with Fidel Castro regarding a statement by Kennedy, fallout from the Punta del Este conference, prospects for Latin American revolutionary spirit, and Raul Castro's upcoming trip to the Soviet Union.

  • March 12, 1962

    Alexei Adzhubei's Account of His Visit to Washington to the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

    Alexei Adzhubei, Khrushchev’s son-in-law and the editor-in-chief of Izvestia, reports on his meetings with US journalists and officials in Washington, DC. Especially significant was his 30 January meeting with President John F. Kennedy in which Kennedy compared the communist revolution in Cuba with the 1956 Hungarian Revolution suppressed by the Soviet Union. Adzhubei also described Kennedy's comments on German reunification.

  • March 15, 1962

    Report on US Policy toward Cuba

    Report on the US attempts to isolate Cuba from other countries in the Western Hemisphere and their intention to use counter-revolutionary forces and the uneasy economic situation in Cuba to incite an internal uprising against the Castro government

  • March 17, 1962

    Intelligence Report on US Plan to Attack Cuba

    Intelligence report on possible US plans to invade Cuba. Forces will invade from Guatemala and Panama, "with support of the armed forces of the USA from their naval base in Guantanamo." The report also mentioned Havana's knowledge of the plan.

  • April 02, 1962

    Message from the Italian Communist Party to the Cuban Leadership

    The Italian Communist Party sends a message to the Cuban government expressing their hope that the Organization of American States (OAS) will begin to see the Cuban perspective and that "the decisions of the OAS cannot suspend the Cuban truth from the American continent."

  • April 13, 1962

    From the Journal of S.M. Kudryavtsev, 'Record of Conversation with Fidel Castro Ruz, Prime Minister of the Republic of Cuba, 22 March 1962'

    Chomon is appointed Minister of Communications, and Inchaustegui's report is corroborated.

  • April 13, 1962

    From the Journal of S.M. Kudryavtsev, 'Record of Conversation with Fidel Castro Ruz, Prime Minister of the Republic of Cuba, 16 March 1962'

    Kudryavtsev and Castro discuss diplomatic normalization between the USSR and Ecuador and a CPSU CC letter directed at restoring global unity of the Communist movement, and a report from Inchaustegui suggests renewed US attacks against Cuba.

  • April 14, 1962

    Soviet Report on Havana's Plan to Train Latin American Partisans

    Report on a conversation between the Cuban Minister of Internal Affairs Ramiro Valdez Menendez and the KGB representative on Havana's decision to organize the training of partisan groups in other Latin American countries. For the time being the Cuban would do this by themselves without the help of the Soviet Union. Valdez said that although Havana agreed with the principle of peaceful coexistence, that did not mean that they could not help their brothers in the neighbor countries.

  • May 29, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Foreign Ministry to Polish Embassy, Washington, 29 May 1962

    Ogrodinski tells Drozniak to meet with officials who deal with Latin American relations and take them to an informal lunch. He tells him the conversation should be of an unofficial nature and it should be aimed at getting to know the officials' views on the current attitude and intentions of the US towards Cuba.

  • June 01, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak), 1 June 1962

    Drozniak replies to Ogrodzinski regarding the information he received from from [Charles E. “Chip”] Bohlen that Cuba has been removed from the list of priorities of US foreign policy. Bohlen also confirms, through Drozniak, that the content of the talks between [Secretary of State Dean] Rusk and [Soviet Ambassador Anatoly] Dobrynin. The Americans are assessing that the USSR is not currently in any hurry to resolve the issue of Berlin. When it comes to a next meeting [between the Americans and the Soviets], the US will wait for a Soviet initiative.

  • June 09, 1962

    Soviet Report by Cuban Involvement in Assisting Partisans in Other Latin American Countries

    Report on a conversation between Fidel Castro and Soviet representatives. Castro believed that revolutionary situation has developed in all Central American countries (except Mexico) and a few South American countries. In his opinion, a slight push in the form of armed actions by partisans would rally the peasant masses and bring about regime change. The report also discussed Havana's low opinion of many Latin American Communist Parties. Cuba's bypassing these parties in interfering in the respective countries' affairs worsened the relations between them and Havana.

  • August 23, 1962

    Soviet Report on American Attempts at Disseminating Fabricated News on Cuba

    Report on the American effort to spread false rumors about the arrival of Soviet military equipments and personnel in Cuba. To counter this subversive attempt, the Cuban security organs has established full control of foreign correspondence and captured maps and intelligence reports.

  • September 14, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 14 September 1962

    Jelen discusses a conversation he had with [Foreign Minister Raúl] Roa [García] on 9 September. They discussed diplomatic visits, UN delegation sessions, and growing tensions in the 'Cuban situation' and possible US military action against Cuba.

  • September 25, 1962

    Report on meeting between the Mexican representative at the Organization of American States (OAS) and the Czechoslovak Ambassador in Washington about US-Cuban tensions over Guantanamo

    According to the Director General and the Czechoslovak Ambassador, the tensions between the U.S. and Cuba stem mostly from the violation of Cuban airspace by airplanes coming from Guantanamo and that the American airplanes had fired machine guns over Cuban territory. The Czechoslovakian Ambassador also reported that the Cuban troops were "in trenches."

  • September 28, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 28 September 1962

    Jelen discusses a call he received from Foreign Minister Raúl Roa [García] regarding President Osvaldo Dorticós' statement to be made during the general debate of the next UN session. He also says that the "Cuban question has gained much attention" and that "currently there was no danger of [US] military aggression against Cuba."

  • September 29, 1962

    Italian Communist Journalist Carmine De Lepsis, Interview with Ernesto 'Che' Guevara, Havana

    In an interview with journalist Carmine De Lepsis, Che Guevara discusses the future development of the Cuban economy, the improvement in productivity and the establishment of new labor laws, dealing with the exodus of technicians, and in general part of the lower middle class, and compares the situation in Cuba to Latin America in general.