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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • January 24, 1964

    From the Diary of A. S. Anikin, Record of a Conversation with the Charge d’Affaires of the Polish People’s Republic in Cuba, Ye. Siurus, 6 January 1964

    Siurus specifies how representatives of the Chinese embassy in Havana are spreading negative propaganda and the Soviet Union in Cuba. Trade negotiations with Poland and Cuban sugar exports to Britain are also discussed.

  • October 17, 1964

    Cable from the Military Attache of the Chinese Embassy in Cuba, 'The Political Department of Cuba's Military Congratulates China on its Nuclear Test'

    Cable from the Military Attache of the Chinese Embassy in Cuba noting a positive response of Lt. Hector, the Cultural Head of the Army Political Department, on China's nuclear weapons test.

  • October 23, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba, 'Reactions to China's Nuclear Test and to Khrushchev's Removal'

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba describing positive responses of Cuban officials and foreign government officials and public in Cuba regarding China's nuclear test.

  • October 29, 1964

    Conversation Record of Premier Zhou Enlai’s Meeting with the Five Ambassadors and Charge d'affaires of Vietnam, Romania, Albania, Cuba, and Korea

    Zhou Enlai evaluates Nikita Khrushchev's dismissal as Secretary of Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

  • March 20, 1965

    Minutes of Conversation between Cuban Defense Minister Raúl Castro and Polish Leader Władysław Gomułka, Warsaw, 20 March 1965

    During his visit in Poland, Castro relates Cuba's position on a conversation taken place in Moscow and why it may be of interest to the Cubans. Gomulka raises the issue of the missiles. In Gomulka's opinion two factors were decisive: contradictions which arose within the socialist camp and the policy which was conducted by Khrushchev. Gomulka is assured that US is capable of conducting a war with Cuba by way of conventional weapons, it does not have to use nuclear weapons. It is clear that the socialist camp and the USSR cannot defend Cuba in any other way but by using nuclear weapons. If a conflict is meant to be, then it will be a nuclear conflict, there is no other way. Gomulka further raises a question whether to go into a nuclear war or not. Castro disagrees with a manner nuclear weapons were withdrawn from Cuba by Soviets. Khruchshev explained that he did not have time. Per Gomulka, Khrushchev conducted a policy which was not thought-out and which was all-out. Gomulka further discusses his talks with Chinese and Vietnamese comrades re: nuclear weapons issue.

  • April 05, 1965

    Note of Polish-Soviet Talks in Warsaw on 5 April 1965

    Exceprts from Polish-Soviet talks on 5 April 1965 that concern the Cuban issue. Brezhnev discusses the recent visit by Raul Castro, that they have very good relations and that the Cuban leaders are worried about the withdrawal of Soviet troops from Cuba. Kosygin discusses the fact that China is becoming more isolated and what that does for relations between Asia and Latin America.

  • March 31, 1966

    Embassy, Havana, Report on the State of the Cuban Communist Party

    In a report on the Cuban Communist Party, Bulgarian Embassy counselor S. Cohen discusses strengths and concerns with the Cuban goverment. The Cuban revolutionary movement debunked the theory of geographically determined fatalism, but also displays a strong dependence on the Latin American liberation movement (e.g. Jose Mari, Simon Bolivar) for inspiration instead of socialist principles. Cohen reports negative developments including the Cuban government’s growing ambition to rule the Third World revolutionary movement and strong belief in the Cuban armed struggle as a template for all national liberation movements. The Cuban delegation strongly endorsed armed struggle as the only means of socialist advancement at the Tricontinental Conference recently held in Havana. Bulgaria must remain close with the Cuban government to help it develop economically and mature politically.

  • June 02, 1967

    From a 2 June 1967 Memo of the Soviet Embassy in the DPRK (1st Secretary V. Nemchinov) about Some New Factors in Korean-Cuban relations

    A description of North Korea's close and supportive relationship with Cuba.

  • December 29, 1969

    Note on Exchanges of Opinions by the Ambassadors and Acting Ambassadors of Hungary, the GDR, Czechoslovakia, the USSR, Bulgaria, Poland, and Mongolia on the Subject of 'The PRC Position vis-a-vis the Socialist Countries' on 21 November and 3 December

    Ambassadors of Hungary, GDR, Czechoslovakia, the USSR, Bulgaria, Poland, and Mongolia discuss the development of socialism and Maoism in the PRC in relation to other countries in the socialist camp.

  • November 12, 1973

    Memorandum of Conversation between Mao Zedong and Henry Kissinger

    Secretary of State Henry Kissinger met with Chairman Mao and Zhou Enlai. The three discussed a large range of topics from Sino-Soviet relations to the Middle East to the influence of Chinese communism.

  • April 30, 1979

    Notes on a Meeting in the Great People's Palace in Peking on 30 April 1979 at 9 A.M

    Huang Hua says that "the Vietnamese were the Cubans of Asia but rather more dangerous." In addition to commenting on the situation in Indochina, Huang weighs in on Soviet and Cuban policies toward the Third World, events in the Middle East, and China's involvement in the United Nations.

  • 1980

    CC CPSU Information on Chinese Foreign Policy Issues

    Discusses the joint efforts by Chinese and American leaders to promote a better relationship between these two countries, at the expense of the Soviet Union and of communism. The U.S. seems to be trying to capitalize on a growing “internal stability” in China, and the U.S. is even now selling equipment to China. The Soviet Union does not believe that this alliance will prove powerful enough to significantly impair other Socialist countries, but their alliance should also not be ignored.

  • January 25, 1982

    Appendix to 'Some New Phenomena in the Chinese Pursuit to Differentiate Socialist Countries'

    Summary of Chinese foreign relations with socialist countries and anti-Soviet policy.

  • January 25, 1985

    Cable from the Embassy of the Hungarian People's Republic to China, 'Some New Phenomena in the Chinese Pursuit to Differentiate Socialist Countries'

    Review of China's foreign policy and its recent efforts to drive a wedge between the Soviet Union and other socialist countries.

  • January 25, 1985

    Appendix to 'Some New Phenomena in the Chinese Pursuit to Differentiate Socialist Countries'

    Analysis of China's relations with other socialist countries and initiatives to "win over" eastern european countries and separate them from the Soviet Union.