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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 02, 1980

    Report by Soviet Defense Minister Ustinov to CPSU CC on 'Foreign Interference' in Afghanistan

    Report by Soviet Defense Minister Ustinov to CPSU CC on "Foreign Interference" in Afghanistan regarding the training of counterrevolutionaries by the US

  • April 29, 1982

    Warsaw Military Court Sentences Zdzislaw Najder to Death

    RFE Polish Service Director Zdzisław Najder is sentenced to death in absentia for treason.

  • April 11, 1983

    Letter with Opinion of Małgorzaty Mehnel–Szyc on Radio Free Europe and the Case against Zdzisław Najder

    RFE Polish Service Director Zdzisław Najder was, like Col. Ryszard Kuklinski and Polish ambassadors who defected after the imposition of martial law, sentenced to death in absentia for treason. This document is an “expert opinion” to the effect that Najder required CIA support to become Polish Service Director.

  • May 23, 1983

    Polish Intelligence Report on Radio Free Europe Links to CIA

    This May 1983 document draws on Polish intelligence service reporting to detect a hidden CIA hand behind RFE broadcasts (although the CIA connection had been severed twelve years earlier). It is representative of Polish intelligence reports on RFE in those years, which were usually far less accurate than Soviet and other East European intelligence reports.

  • February 12, 1984

    Report by Gen. Bryg. Zdzislaw Sarewicz, Chief of Polish Foreign Intelligence on the Use of Paris-Based Polish Bookstore by the CIA-Funded International Literary Center

    Report on George Minden and the International Literary Center (ILC) by chief of Polish intelligence general Zdzislaw Sarewicz, stating that the operation was funded by United States government and the US intelligence service.

  • November 07, 1984

    Report by Agent 'Gerard' on Paris-Based Polish Bookstore and Activities of CIA-Funded International Literacy Center

    Report by a Polish intelligence agent on the International Literary Center (ILC) in Paris which lists the types of Polish people who were given anti-Communist books at the store (number of engineers, architects, intellectuals, etc.)

  • 1998

    Interview with Robert W. Hultslander, Last CIA Station Chief in Luanda, Angola

    CIA station chief in Luanda, Hultslander gives his perspective on the US involvement in Angola. In his interview he explains what the US knew about liberation movements prior to the outbreak of Civil War, his opinion on the CIA covert action program IAFEATURE, the Cuban presence in Angola and his assessment of the leading factions in Angola; MPLA, UNITA and FNLA.

  • June, 2007

    The Yuri Case. Folder 91. The Chekist Anthology.

    In this entry, Mitrokhin draws upon KGB sources to describe Yuri Velichkov Bagomil Stanimerov (b.1941), a Bulgarian citizen who graduated from the Moscow State Institute of International Relations in 1968. Stanimerov was recruited by the Bulgarian branch of the KGB in 1970, and became a resident of Sweden in 1972. Mitrokhin’s summary of KGB documents indicates that in April 1974, CIA officer Huey Walter “Hearst” made Stanimerov an offer in the name of the National Security Council. While Stanimerov refused the offer, he told Hearst that he would continue collaborating with him. Stanimerov subsequently traveled to many foreign countries, but the Americans no longer expressed interest in him. In 1975, Stanimerov was sent to work in the Bulgarian embassy in the United States. The Americans began to train Stanimerov as a spy and tried to ideologically convert him. The Mitrokhin account posits that the KGB gave Stanimerov instructions in case the latter succeeded in infiltrating the CIA. In 1978, the KGB received information regarding the fact that Stanimerov was being investigated by the FBI for his ties with the Bulgarian intelligence services