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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 19, 1962

    Minutes of the Council of Ministers, The Hague, 19 October 1962 (excerpt)

    The meeting of the Council of Ministers at The Hague revolved around the ongoing naval blockade of Cuba by the United States. The Dutch Assistant Secretary of State related that while the Americans are remaining firm on the Cuban situation, his visit to President Kennedy revealed he was very tense and was looking for a solution. The Foreign Ministry has yet to give an definitive stance on Cuba, but the primary concern for the Dutch Government was freedom of the sea and free flow of trade. The Minister of Justice concludes that while the government has no power to stop ships from going to Cuba, it does have the power to bar arms shipments.

  • October 19, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Foreign Minister A.A. Gromyko to the CC CPSU

    Gromyko expresses satisfaction at the current American policy of economic embargo toward Cuba and the administration’s current preoccupation in West Berlin

  • October 19, 1962

    Cable from USSR ambassador to the USA Dobrynin to Soviet Foreign Ministry

    Dobrynin reports a speech made by Kennedy during a closed conference, where he discusses Cuba.

  • October 20, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak)

    Drozniak compiles information he has collected from US Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs William R. Tyler and US Ambassador at Large Llewellyn E. Thompson on the rising Cuban situation and US-USSR relations.

  • October 20, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Foreign Minister Gromyko to the CC CPSU

    Gromyko relays the results of a meeting with Dean Rusk where the two discuss Cuba, issues in Latin America and American acts or aggression toward Cuba.

  • October 20, 1962

    Cable from Soviet Foreign Minister Gromyko on 18 October 1962 meeting with President Kennedy (excerpts)

    Gromyko expresses that the Soviet government is committed to assist Cuba in the face of a US blockade. Kennedy says that the recent build up Soviet supplies to Cuba negatively affected the US population and Congress and that his actions were meant to calm public opinion; also that the US had no intention of invading Cuba.

  • October 22, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to Cuba Alekseev to the USSR MFA

    Alekseev’s response to the US threats toward Cuba.

  • October 22, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to the USA Dobrynin to the USSR MFA

    Dobrynin sends the results of a meeting where Rusk invites him to his home and asks him to deliver a message to Khrushchev and text of JFK’s message to be transmitted over TASS.

  • October 22, 1962

    Telegram from TROSTNIK (Soviet Defense Minister Rodion Malinovsky) to PAVLOV (General Isa Pliev)

    Malinovsky warns Pliev of possible a American landing in Cuba and directs him to make preparations, a joint effort between Cuban and Soviet troops.

  • October 22, 1962

    State Department Telegram 451 to US Embassy Egypt

    State Department reports that a second US visit to Dimona reaffirmed previous view that there was no evidence of preparations for nuclear weapons production.

  • October 22, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet representative to the UN Zorin to Soviet Foreign Ministry

    Zorin transmits the US’s letter to the UN security council regarding Soviet weapons in Cuba. Zorin states that the US’s letter is a means to legitimize the US blockade on Cuba. Soviet representatives to the UN had a preliminary discussion with the Cuban representative about the possibility of submitting an examination of the issue of US action against Cuba before consulting with other members of the Council on the time for convening the meeting.

  • October 22, 1962

    Cable from Federal Republic of Germany Embassy, Washington (Knappstein)

    An analysis of American decisions during the Cuban Missile Crisis and the economic blockade, as well as of American perceptions of Soviet intentions during that time period, by the West German Ambassador to the United States.

  • October 22, 1962

    Amintore Fanfani Diaries (excepts)

    The few excerpts about Cuba are a good example of the importance of the diaries: not only do they make clear Fanfani’s sense of danger and his willingness to search for a peaceful solution of the crisis, but the bits about his exchanges with Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs Carlo Russo, with the Italian Ambassador in London Pietro Quaroni, or with the USSR Presidium member Frol Kozlov, help frame the Italian position during the crisis in a broader context.

  • October 22, 1962

    Meeting between General Charles de Gaulle and Dean Acheson, Elysee Palace, Paris

    General Charles de Gaulle and Dean Acheson discuss installation of U.S. blockade around Cuiba and Soviet missiles, as well as the political goals of each.

  • October 22, 1962

    Manlio Brosio Diaries (excerpts)

    Diary entries from Manlio Brosio, an Italian foreign service diplomat, from his time as Ambassador to Paris during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

  • October 23, 1962

    Soviet Report on American Secrecy Efforts

    Report on US secrecy prior to President Kennedy's October 22 speech announcing the discovery of Soviet missiles in Cuba and the start of a US blockade. Also describes press conference by Robert McNamara.

  • October 23, 1962

    Telegram from Mexican Embassy, Santo Domingo

    A telegram from the Mexican Embassy outlining that the Government of Cuba has turned a dangerous situation into, in their eyes, a peaceful one by allowing an aggressive Russian base with nuclear weapons in Cuba, as well as by measures for public force to suppress possible disorders.

  • October 23, 1962

    Message from Mexican President Adolfo López Mateos to Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos

    A message from Mexican President Adolfo López Mateos to Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos. President Mateos expresses his concern with the possibility of weapons of aggression existing in Cuba. President Mateos hopes Cuba has not yet acquired these weapons, but that if it in fact has, he says that Mexico hopes "those bases are not used in any form whatsoever and the offensive weapons are withdrawn from Cuban territory."

  • October 23, 1962

    Telegram from Swiss Foreign Ministry to Swiss Embassy in Havana (Stadelhofer)

    A telegram from the Swiss Foreign Ministry in Berne to the Swiss Embassy in Havana that describes the difficult and complex diplomatic situation presented by the Cuban crisis.

  • October 23, 1962

    Cable from Washington (Schiff) via The Hague (CELER), 23 October 1962

    The Hague receives a cable from Washington reporting on the developing crisis in Cuba. There is talk of a "New Foreign Policy Move" by the government, though the British and French Embassies do not have any idea what is happening. The cable closes with a report that Kennedy has convened a special session of the National Security Council and cabinet, and is expected to make a statement later that day.