Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS

  • August 25, 1968

    Report from Political Board of Polish Second Army

    Report on the use of propaganda materials and how they have been distributed in Czech cities and villages. It also lists several incidents of hostility expressed by Czech soldiers/citizens towards Warsaw Pact soldiers.

  • August 26, 1968

    Report from the Second Army's Political Department at 19:00 hours

    Document continues reporting on relations between Czech citizens and Warsaw Pact armies as well as the state of Polish Second Army. Report describes propaganda dissemination in villages and cities as well as how unfriendly relations between Czech and Polish soldiers remain.

  • August 26, 1968

    Report from Polish Second Army’s Political Department at 7:35 hours

    Report praises soldiers of the Polish Second Army for their political maturity and high spirits but says that relations between Czech citizens and soldiers of Second Army are not amicable. On August 25th, the political branch of Second Army led a propaganda operation designed for Czech society and soldiers.

  • September 04, 1968

    Report Regarding the Implementation of the Second Phase of Operation Danube

    Chief of General Staff and Deputy Minister of National Defense General Chocha describes what steps need to be taken now that the Army is transitioning into the second phase of the "Danube" operation.

  • September 05, 1968

    Yurii Andropov, Nikolai Shchelokov, and Mikhail Malyarov to the CPSU CC

    This memorandum, signed by Yurii Andropov, the chairman of the Soviet Committee of State Security (KGB); Nikolai Shchelokov, the Minister of Public Order (whose ministry was renamed the Ministry of Internal Affairs in late November 1968); and Mikhail Molyarov, the Procurator of the USSR, was sent to the ruling Politburo of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU) eleven days after the demonstration in Red Square against the Soviet-led invasion of Czechoslovakia. The document lays out the basic facts of the case as viewed by the KGB and the CPSU. The document mentions the names of the eight activists who were in Red Square as well as two who helped with planning but were not actually in Red Square, Inna Korkhova and Maiya Rusakovskaya. Natal’ya Gorbanevskaya, one of the eight, was detained but released because she had recently given birth. However, a year later she was arrested in connection with her involvement and sentenced to a harsh term in a psychiatric prison.

  • September 07, 1968

    Report from the Political Department of Polish Second Army on the emotional-political condition of the soldiers taking part in Operation ‘Danube’

    Report states the morale of soldiers taking part in Operation Danube is still good. But there is still no change in the unfriendly relations between Czech people and Warsaw Pact soldiers. The report describes how the Czech people are under the influence of revisionist and reactionary propaganda. It also details the conflict between Czech soldiers and Polish soldiers. It also gives an update of propaganda being broadcast through Czech radio stations.

  • September 30, 1968

    Gen. Djurov’s Report on the participation of Bulgarian troops in the Warsaw Pact operation in Czechoslovakia, 30 September 1968

    The Minister reports on the progress of the allied operation and on the strength of the Czech resistance.

  • November 15, 1968

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry, 15 November 1968

    The Hungarian Embassy provides a brief on a visit by the Japanese Communist Party to North Korea.

  • November 26, 1968

    Note on the events at the Seminar of Red Cross Journals from Socialist Countries, held in Prague, 19-22 Nov. 1968. Cover note from Anton Moisescu, President of the Romanian Red Cross, to Nicolae Ceausescu, Secretary General, CC RCP.

    Note about the experiences of N. Palade, Chief Editor of the Romanian Red Cross journal "Sanatatea" at the Socialist bloc seminar of Red Cross journals. The information note discusses Czechoslovak reactions to the Soviet-led invasion and occupation of Czechoslovakia and especially of Prague. Palade describes his reception by the Czechoslovak officials and the current attitude of the Czechoslovak population vis-à-vis the Soviet Union and the other East Bloc countries, describing the pessimism that seized the population after the August 1968 invasion.