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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • January 03, 1976

    Excerpt from Chernyaev Diary on Dissidents in the Soviet Union

    Chemyaev writes on a meeting of the Politburo when Andropov presented a memo on dissidents and political prisoners in the USSR.

  • January 23, 1976

    Protocol on cooperation between the Interior Ministries of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Soviet Union in 1976

    This agreement provides for short visits of employees of the Czechoslovak and Soviet Interior Ministries to the other country in order to study and exchange information on a variety of topics, including informational systems, mechanized and automated systems of computational technology and criminology. Details on recreational visits for employees of the two Ministries and conference dates are also given. An exchange of publications is finalized, with the works listed by title and number of copies; these documents relate to security, criminology and statistics.

  • February 13, 1976

    Information regarding the meeting of the fraternal intelligence services held in Prague on the 13th and the 14th of February 1976

    Summary of main points from the meeting of the fraternal intelligence services held in Prague on the 13th and the 14th of February 1976.

  • March 13, 1976

    Committee for State Security Report, 'On the Results of Search for Authors of Anti-Soviet Anonymous Documents in 1975'

    The Committee for State Security reported on results in exposing authors and distributors of anti-Soviet propaganda during 1975. In comparison with results from 1974, the number of authors writing, distributing, and preparing these anti-Soviet documents was overall reduced, but due to copying technology, the volume of documents has grown.

  • March 30, 1976

    Report on the Work of the Committee for State Security in 1975

    The Committee for State Security reported to Brezhnev on Soviet security during 1975. The report includes information on the KGB, intelligence and counterintelligence, anti-Soviet countries and organizations, and the prevention of hostile actions.

  • June 04, 1976

    Agreement between the Czechoslovak and Soviet Ministries of the Interior on cooperation from the summer of 1976 until 1980

    This plan focuses on developing and strengthening bilateral ties between the two countries in the areas of science, technology, security operations and criminology. It also calls for the sharing of best practices of propaganda methods, roadway security and oversight, education of government officials and administrative organization of bureaus such as the Ministry of the Interior. Provisions are made to exchange methods designed to improve the systems of permit, passport and visa issuance and registration of aliens. The sharing of best practices to reduce alcohol abuse, vagrancy, recidivism and youth crime is discussed as well.

  • August 30, 1976

    Cooperative agreement between the Interior Ministry of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Soviet Union KGB

    The Czechoslovak and Soviet security branches agreed to cooperate in the acquisition of documents and the sharing of information on hostile persons. The two parties committed to favorable relations within international organizations and joint counter-intelligence measures, articulating a focus on improving intelligence and counter-intelligence on the U.S. and its allies and China. Both parties vow to assist each other in illegal intelligence work and in the counter-intelligence monitoring of persons working for embassies, international firms or otherwise engaged in economic relations. The Czechoslovaks and Soviets agree to coordinate actions before providing assistance to security programs in developing countries, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and the Vietnamese Socialist Republic.

  • November 15, 1976

    Committee for State Security Report, 'About the Hostile Actions of the So-called Group for Assistance of Implementation of the Helsinki Agreements in the USSR'

    This report by the Committee for State Security covers trends in anti-Soviet propaganda and the creation of the "Group for Assistance of Implementation of the Helsinki Agreements in the USSR" by Yuri F. Orlov. The purpose of the group was to promote the alleged failure of the USSR's efforts to implement the Final Act of the Conference for Security and Cooperation in Europe.

  • January 20, 1977

    CC CPSU Proposal, 'On Measures for the Curtailment of the Criminal Activities of Orlov, Ginsburg, Rudenko and Ventslova'

    U.V. Andropov and R.A. Rudenko reported on hostile activities of anti-Soviet groups within the USSR. They stated that Western correspondents influence these organizations to openly protest the Soviet Union's policies. Finally, Andropov and Rudenko discuss preemptive measures that need to be taken in order to stop anti-Soviet propaganda disseminated by these groups.

  • March 04, 1977

    Cooperative agreement between the Soviet KGB and Czechoslovak Ministry of the Interior for the year 1977

    The Soviet KGB and Czechoslovak Interior Ministry agree to the exchange of workers between the two countries. These exchanges would focus on the sharing of information and expertise in various areas, including: identification procedures for unidentified bodies, security measures for capital regions, fire-fighting methods and ways to combat subversive activity in youth and teenagers. The two parties also agree to the exchange of publications on the Soviet military, security and criminology, which are listed by title and number of copies.

  • December 01, 1977

    Agreement between the Soviet KGB and Czechoslovak Ministry of the Interior from the summer of 1978 to 1980

    In order to combat the perceived threat of hostile, foreign special agents operating on Soviet and Czechoslovak territory, the two parties agree to centralize their efforts to ensure the security of the two countries. In order to counter the special agents of capitalist countries and preserve the security of state secrets, the two parties decide to exchange counter-intelligence activity on subversive activity in Czechoslovakia, the Soviet Union and other socialist states. The two parties agree to focus on citizens of capitalist countries such as the United States, England, France and other NATO member nations and citizens of the People's Republic of China and the German Democratic Republic in their intelligence efforts. Specifically, the parties agree to monitor citizens of these countries working in Czechoslovakia and the Soviet Union and people working for representative agencies of the aforementioned countries. Also being monitored are Czechoslovak and Soviet citizens returning from capitalist or developing countries, corresponding with people in capitalist countries and having an address in a capitalist country. In conclusion, the KGB and Czechoslovak Interior Ministry agree to regular, bilateral exchange of information on hostile residents of both countries who are thought to be in the employ of the special intelligence services of NATO countries and China.

  • December 05, 1977

    Cooperation agreement between the state security schools of the Soviet Union and Czechoslovak Socialist Republic

    The two schools agree to bilateral consultations regarding training content and internships for cadets and to share teaching materials, teachers, recorded lectures and film. Both educational institutions pledge to work together to determine a common plan for each school year. This agreement also mentions the Soviet Red Banner distinction.

  • December 27, 1977

    Letter from Sixth Directorate of Bulgarian State Security on KGB Support

    This document from the Sixth Directorate of Bulgarian State Security thanks “Soviet comrades” for their assistance in combating hostile propaganda against Bulgaria. It acknowledges the role of State Security in publishing articles in the Bulgarian media “exposing” RFE and RL, and refers to joint Soviet-Bulgarian operations against Western radios.

  • 1978

    Bulgarian General Stoyanov Meets KGB Geneneral Bobkov to Discuss Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty

    Various counter-measures against RFE and RL were discussed in this meeting, including a possible international trial of the “committee” supporting RFE and RL.

  • February 22, 1978

    Agreement between the Soviet and Czechoslovak Interior Ministries for the year 1978

    The two parties agree to worker exchanges in the areas including scientific information, and computational processing. Details on sending Czechoslovak workers and state security school students to various state schools in the Soviet Union to study politics, foreign policy, fire-fighting techniques, engineering, criminal investigation and the Soviet. The criminology departments of the two ministries pledge to exchange tactics, methods and expertise. Officials of the two ministries agree to exchange information on the gravest problems in their country every six months.

  • March 29, 1978

    Protocol Guiding Cooperation between the Stasi and the KGB, 1978

    Agreement between the Stasi and KGB outlining the placement of KGB liaison officers and their responsibilities, as well as granting the KGB the right to recruit East German citizens for intelligence work.

  • November 24, 1978

    Security agreement between the Soviet KGB and the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic Ministry of the Interior from summer 1978 - 1980

    The two parties set forth their joint security strategy to manage perceived threats to state authority from the summer of 1978 through 1980. They agree to work with broadcast stations, including Radio Free Europe, to ensure they are not subversive stations and to use Czechoslovak students as agents against subversive radio stations. The parties highlight the importance of fighting Zionist and Trotskyist organizations, and make plans to cooperate to infiltrate organizations, including Jewish religious groups, that may have been infiltrated by these organizations. KGB and Czechoslovak security officials pledge to cooperate in monitoring and infiltrating international communist groups and reactionary church groups, including some associated with the Vatican, in order to detect and foil potential upcoming actions against the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia and other socialist countries. Foreign religious groups active in Czechoslovakia and the Soviet Union, such as Jehovah's Witnesses and Seventh-day Adventists, are mentioned as potentially anti-state. Both parties agree to cooperate in order to frustrate attempts by anti-socialist parties in Czechoslovak to connect with anti-state dissidents in the Soviet Union and share information on new forms of fighting actions of anti-socialist individuals. To combat ideological diversion, the parties decide to promote scientific and cultural exchanges between the two countries. The Soviet and Czechoslovak delegates decide to implement counter-intelligence and anti-ideological diversion measures at prominent international events such as the 1980 Summer (Moscow) and Winter (Lake Placid) Olympic Games and international film festivals, exhibitions and fairs to be held in the Soviet Union. Both parties agree to monitor extremist and terrorist groups, youth organizations in East Germany, France, England and the United States and Kurdish students studying in Europe.

  • December 06, 1978

    Moldavian Communist Party Central Committee, No. 294s, to President of the USSR Committee for State Security (KGB), Andropov, 'Regarding the Necessity of Increasing the Number of Personnel of the Moldavian SSR KGB'

    The Moldavian Communist Party requests an increase in the number of KGB personnel in Moldavia to assist with efforts to "curb subversive activity" originating in Romania. This “ideological subversion” was further propagated by the Romanian print and broadcast media, through direct mailings (mail correspondence having “surpassed 500 thousand letters per year”) and through Romanian citizens visiting the republic who sought to indoctrinate the Soviet people “in an anti-Soviet, anti-Russian spirit."

  • December 08, 1978

    Cooperative plan between the Interior Ministry of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the KGB of the Soviet Union from the summer of 1979-1981

    The parties agree to assist one another in the collection of intelligence information on political, economic, scientific and technical matters and exchange information on suspicious contacts of Czechoslovak and Soviet citizens suspected to be spies or subversive. Both agree to the exchange of counter-intelligence regarding Czechoslovak and Soviet citizens working in scientific organizations and international exhibitions, fairs and congresses. Steps are outlined to protect railroad cargo using troops from Warsaw Pact states, prevent eavesdropping of telecommunications and detect and prevent foreign terrorist attacks on Czechoslovak and Soviet airplanes and anti-socialist interruption of international trucking lines. Special mention is made of multiple international transportation organizations that need to be monitored. Information-sharing procedures are agreed to for commercial and industrial firms, banks, scientific centers and international scientific organizations.

  • 1979

    Bulgarian Cooperation with KGB against 'Subversive Centers'

    This document provides further details of joint KGB-Bulgarian measures to counter RFE and RL. It vaunts the effectiveness of Bulgarian regime counterpropaganda, claiming that it thwarted Western efforts to create internal strife in Bulgaria.