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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • July 13, 1953

    CIA Information Report, 'Plans for Strikes in East Germany'

    A series of intelligence information regarding strike plans throughout Eastern Germany.

  • July 15, 1953

    Memorandum from S. Kruglov to G.M. Malenkov

    Kruglov reports on the arrest of organizers during the East German protests.

  • July 31, 1953

    Resolution of the CPSU Central Committee (Draft)

    Draft resolution before the CPSU CC, seeking approval for actions required to strengthen the Soviet position in Germany and increasing the counteraction of the aggressive plans of the Anglo-American bloc in Europe.

  • August 07, 1953

    CIA Information Report, 'Unrest over Food Packages'

    This CIA report contains information regarding disturbances in various East German cities, beginning on 2 August, 1953.

  • August 08, 1953

    Cable from James B. Conant to John Foster Dulles

    Conant suggests that while US policy towards East Germany should, on principle, encourage the “spirit of resistance” brought about by the East German Uprising, it is believed that Communist authorities will continue to use brutal tactics to restrain such resistance, and therefore US initiatives towards the situation should be restrained as to not provide East German authorities an opportunity for more brutal repressions of the population.

  • August 20, 1953

    Memorandum from Leonid Brezhnev to Nikita Khrushchev

    General Secretary of the CPSU CC, Brezhnev, reports to Khrushchev about the New Course of the SED and the political mood of the population of the GDR. Although improvements are being made and productivity is increasing, there is still a general lack of popular support and trust in the decisions of the SED.

  • August 25, 1953

    Stenographic Transcript of Conference with the Delegations that Returned from the GDR

    Report of a Moscow delegation on their impressions of the situation in East Germany. They describe grievances at the root of the June 17 uprising and make suggestions for improvements to the GDR factory system.

  • September 10, 1953

    CIA Information Report, 'Aftermath of the Riots'

    A CIA report presents information about the aftermath of the East German Uprising and known plans and actions taken by the SED in terms of arrests and reconstruction efforts.

  • June 10, 1989

    Secret Instructions by State Security (MfS) Chief Erich Mielke to Heads of all State Security Units

    In response to Western reports about the Tiananmen Square protests, Chief Erich Mielke alerts State Security to suppress all offensive anti-Chinese activity and propaganda in the GDR.

  • October 12, 1989

    Assessment Paper by the Austrian Foreign Ministry, '[Excerpt] Eastern Europe; General Assessment'

    The Assessment Paper outlines new change is Eastern Europe, mostly surrounding political and economic diversification, following Gorabachev's leadership in the USSR. The report then evaluates the GDR's economy, emigration, and anticipated political changes in light of the new geopolitical climate.

  • November 07, 1989

    Information Note from the Romanian Embassy in Berlin to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    Note from the Romanian Embassy in Berlin to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding continuing protests in the streets, the proposal to allow freedom to travel to foreign countries, the demands by the population for the removal of the Politburo and all ministers, and the movement towards the economic integration of the GDR with the FRG.

  • November 24, 1989

    Information by the East German Office of National Security on the Austrian Assessment of the Situation in the GDR and the Development of Austrian–East German Relations, Berlin (East)

    The document recounts the discussion between party officials from Austria's People's Party and Socialist Party in regards to changing developments in East and West Germany. Based on historical, political, and economic precedent, the overwhelming sentiment is against reunification. However, due to the rapidness of political events in the GDR the Socialist Party had yet to decide how to react. The parties then outline a plan to establish connections from both East and West German leadership as well as resistance movements in Hungary, Poland, and Yugoslavia.

  • December 22, 1989

    Johann Plattner, Austrian Foreign Ministry, 'Visit of [Mock] to Great Britain (19–21 December 1989); Meeting of Envoy Plattner with Department Head Synnott'

    The report relays a meeting between Austrian and British foreign ministry officers concerning potential German reunification. It elaborates that both countries are concerned about reunification pushed for by protest movements and happening outside European peace negotiations - potentially compromising USSR Security.