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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • November 16, 1962

    Cable from Japanese Embassy in Havana to Tokyo

    A cable describing the situation in Havana, Cuba after the US Blockade. It especially points out the economic results, like what product goods and commodities are available, and transportation networks.

  • November 16, 1962

    Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Presidium Protocol 66

    Protocol 66 is the first Malin note dated after the Cuban Missile Crisis, on 11 November. The tone of the protocol indicates that Castro is not pleased with Khrushchev's handling of the crisis, and there is a growing sense of distance between Cuba and the Soviet Union.

  • November 16, 1962

    Cable no. 365 from the Czechoslovak Embassy in Havana (Pavlíček)

    The cable relays an important development in regards to press coverage of the resolution of the Cuban Missile Crisis. There are strict controls and reviews to be placed on news from the Soviet Union, and there is to be no publications by Presna Latina about peaceful coexistence or solidarity with the Soviet Union, about export of arms, etc. until a resolution has been reached. Khrushchev's name is not to be mentioned anywhere. There are also strict limitations placed on foreign correspondents and journalists.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 4:30 p.m., Friday

    Pinto analyzes Fidel Castro's decision to accept the “unilateral inspection,” when, beforehand, he always rejected inspection of this character.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Foreign Ministry to the Brazilian Delegation at the United Nations General Assembly, New York, 9 p.m., Friday

    The Brazilian delegation to the United Nations General Assembly advises the Brazilian government not to postpone the voting on the draft resolution about the denuclearization of Latin America.

  • November 16, 1962

    Israeli Foreign Ministry, Jerusalem, to Israeli Embassy, Havana

    Israeli Ambassador to Brazil Arie] Eshel sent a telegram from Rio about Brazil's efforts to mediate the Cuban crisis, as well as Brazil's attempt to pass a resolution at the Security Council declaring Latin America, Africa and the Middle East nuclear free zones but that they were unable to do so due to French opposition.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak), 16 November 1962

    There is a belief within the US administration that Mikoyan was not successful in convincing Fidel Castro to adopt a Soviet point of view.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 16 November 1962

    Jelen discusses various issues of the Cuban Missile Crisis: Mikoyan's visit; the shooting down of American planes; IL-28 bombers; etc.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Delegation at the United Nations General Assembly (Afonso Arinos), New York, 7:30 p.m., Friday

    Melo-Franco and Cuba's ambassador discuss the nuclearization of Latin America draft to the UN General Assembly.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 6:30 p.m., Friday

    Pinto discusses the current situation in Cuba and feels certain that Cuba depends more and more on Soviet economic help, but that Fidel Castro feels sure of that there will only be an overthrow due to an American invasion or by a prolonged total blockade, that will have more grave international implications.

  • November 16, 1962

    Information on the DPRK Position Regarding Measures by the Soviet Government for a Peaceful Resolution of the Cuba Conflict and Regarding the Chinese-Indian Border Conflict

    The reporter notes that the Korean press, Kim Il Sung, and the Korean Labor Party didn't talk much about Soviet aid for Cuba, and that North Korea supports China in the Chinese-Indian boundary dispute.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos), 9 p.m., Friday

    A report from Roberto de Oliveira Campos on how certain actions and diplomatic moves during the Cuban crisis have served to inflame international tensions on both sides.

  • November 16, 1962

    Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Preliminary Study of Consequences of Severing Relations with India'

    As per Zhou Enlai's request, the Chinese Foreign Ministry put together a preliminary study of the consequences of and how to respond to two contingencies: 1/India severed diplomatic relations with China and 2/India declared war on China

  • November 16, 1962

    Excerpt from Protocol No. 66 of Session of CC CPSU Presidium, 'Instructions to Comrade A. I. Mikoyan'

    Khrushchev explains his agreement with Kennedy to Ambassador Mikoyan, in which the Soviet Union promised to remove weapons from Cuba on the condition that the US will lift the quarantine and prevent further invasion or attacks on Cuba.

  • November 16, 1962

    Record of Conversation between Mikoyan and Ernesto 'Che' Guevara, Havana, 16 November 1962

    The conversation takes place soon after the IL-28 crisis, which gives Mikoyan a chance to patch up the relationship with trade agreements and promises of future aid and industrial cooperation. Near the end of the conversation, Guevara and Mikoyan discuss the theory of revolutionary struggle. Guevara shares his vision that “further development of the revolutions in Latin America must follow the line of simultaneous explosions in all countries.” Mikoyan cautions him, pointing to the Soviet experience and using the metaphor of the rebellion on the battleship “Potemkin.” Hinting at further disagreement ahead, he gently registers his disagreement with the Cuban leader’s drive to ignite revolution in the hemisphere.

  • November 17, 1962

    Telegram from Chilean Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (Ruiz Solar)

    Ruiz Solar discusses in a telegram U Thant's proposal regarding the Cuban crisis. Thant’s proposal mainly consists in establishing permanent inspection in Cuba by representatives of neutral countries chosen by the Cuban Government.

  • November 17, 1962

    Letter from Swiss Ambassador to Cuba (Stadelhofer) to the Secretary General of the Swiss Foreign Ministry (Micheli)

    Stadelhofer describes a short meeting with Fidel Castro. However, since the conversation took place at an event directly next to the table reserved for members of the government and since President Osvaldo Dorticós and Minister of Industries, Ernesto "Che" Guevara, were listening in, he had to refrain from addressing issues of importance.

  • November 18, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Foreign Minister A.A. Gromyko to A.I. Mikoyan

    Soviet refusal to join the Cubans in firing at American planes.

  • November 19, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Moscow (da Cunha), 6 p.m., Monday

    Da Cunha reports that the Soviet press (and government) has hidden from its readers the recent evolution of the Cuban problem/crisis.

  • November 19, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Belgrade, 12:30 p.m., Monday

    A brief analysis of Chinese-Cuban relations during the crisis and Fidel Castro's diplomatic skills in his relations with both the United States and Soviet Union.