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  • September 28, 1993

    Cable No. 5514, Ambassador Hatano to the Foreign Minister, 'Japan-United States Summit Meeting (Separate Telegram 1)'

    Hosokawa and Clinton discuss health care reform in the United States and political reform in Japan.

  • September 28, 1993

    Cable No. 5515, Ambassador Hatano to the Foreign Minister, 'Japan-United States Summit Meeting (Separate Telegram 2)'

    Hosokawa, Clinton, and Warren Christopher discuss US-Japan economic relations.

  • February 12, 1994

    Cable No. 1459, Ambassador Kuriyama to the Foreign Minister, 'Japan-United States Summit Meeting (Working Lunch, Separate Telegram 2: North Korea)'

    This cable, apparently summarizing US-Japan talks on the North Korean nuclear issue, was withheld in its entirety by the Japanese Foreign Ministry.

  • February 12, 1994

    Cable No. 1460, Ambassador Kuriyama to the Foreign Minister, 'Japan-United States Summit Meeting (Working Lunch, Separate Telegram 3: China)'

    Ambassador Kuriyama summarizes an exchange between Secretary of State Christopher and Foreign Minister Hata concerning relations with China.

  • February 12, 1994

    Cable No. 1462, Ambassador Kuriyama to the Foreign Minister, 'Japan-United States Summit Meeting (Working Lunch, Separate Telegram 5: EEV, President Clinton’s Invitation to Visit Japan)'

    At the conclusion of their talks, Clinton and Hosokawa discuss the upcoming visit by the Emperor and Empress of Japan to the United States, as well as the possibility of Clinton visiting Japan in the near future.

  • February 12, 1994

    Cable No. 1457, Ambassador Kuriyama to the Foreign Minister, 'Japan-United States Summit Meeting (Working Lunch)'

    Ambassador Kuriyama reports on the results of the working luncheon held between President Clinton and Prime Minister Hosokawa. Individual issues covered during the luncheon are described in a series of subsequent cables.

  • February 12, 1994

    Cable No. 1458, Ambassador Kuriyama to the Foreign Minister, 'Japan-United States Summit Meeting (Working Lunch, Separate Telegram 1: Energy, Other Issues)'

    The US and Japan discuss cooperation in the development of hydrogen engines and hybrid engines for automobiles.

  • February 12, 1994

    Cable No. 1461, Ambassador Kuriyama to the Foreign Minister, 'Japan-United States Summit Meeting (Working Lunch, Separate Telegram 4: Russia)'

    Clinton and Hosokawa discuss efforts to support economic and political reforms in Russia.

  • February 12, 1994

    Cable No. 1468, Ambassador Kuriyama to the Foreign Minister, 'Japan-United States Summit Meeting (Small Group Meeting) (2 of 2)'

    President Clinton and Prime Minister Hosokawa have a detailed discussion about US-Japan economic ties. Vice President Al Gore, Secretary of State Warren Christopher, and Foreign Minister Hata also participate.

  • February 12, 1994

    Cable No. 1456, Ambassador Kuriyama to the Foreign Minister, 'Japan-United States Summit Meeting (Small Group Meeting) (1 of 2)'

    Clinton and Hosokawa discuss US-Japan economic ties.

  • July 27, 1994

    Letter, L. H. Evans Director General, to Mr. Tielman de Waal, Chief Executive of Armscor, Regarding Arms Sales

    The Director General Evans writes to the Chief Executive of Armscor recommending South Africa be more discreet when selling arms to other states.

  • December 11, 1995

    State Department Telegram 285472 to US Embassy in Tokyo, 'ACDA Director Hollum’s Meeting with Japanese Officials'

    Talking points for Arms Control and Disarmament Agency Director Hollum from the State Department. Hollum was instructed to “urge” the Japanese to convey their concern to the government of India and “strong opposition [to] any such tests.” The State Department did not want to make any public statements about the situation because that “would be counterproductive,” that is, it would tip the U.S.’s hand Japan to tell Tokyo to voice its concerns over the possible Indian Nuclear Test to New Delhi.

  • June, 2007

    On Human Rights. Folder 51. The Chekist Anthology.

    Outlines the KGB’s response to the USSR’s signing of the Helsinki Accords in 1975. The accords obligated signatories to respect their citizens’ human rights. This gave Soviet dissidents and westerners leverage in demanding that the USSR end persecution on the basis of religious or political beliefs. Some of the KGB’s active measures included the establishment of a charitable fund dedicated to helping victims of imperialism and capitalism, and the fabrication of a letter from a Ukrainian group to FRG President Walter Scheel describing human rights violations in West Germany. The document also mentions that the Soviet Ministry of Defense obtained an outline of the various European powers’ positions on human rights issues as presented at the March 1977 meeting of the European Economic Community in London from the Italian Foreign Ministry. The KGB also initiated Operation “Raskol” [“Schism”], which ran between 1977 and 1980. This operation included active measures to discredit Soviet dissidents Andrei Sakharov, Yelena Bonner, and Alexander Solzhenitsyn, measures designed to drive a wedge between the US and its democratic allies, and measures intended to convince the US government that continued support for the dissident movement did nothing to harm the position of the USSR.

  • June, 2007

    An Illegal Trainer (KGB history of agent "Halef"). Folder 60. The Chekist Anthology.

    Describes training techniques used by the KGB in logistical preparation of their operatives for assignments abroad. This article focuses on the employment history of the KGB agent codenamed “Halef.” Between 1955 and 1967, Halef was stationed in Hong Kong and Tokyo. In 1967, due to his insignificant feedback and a weak performance as a field operative, Halef was transferred back as a trainer. As a trainer, Halef traveled extensively. While in the United States, the KGB developed a fictitious identity for Halef – a so-called legend-biography – in case his activity aroused suspicion and he were detained by authorities. In the United States, France and Mexico, Halef’s objectives included developing and testing means of communication with the KGB, which could be used to inform the KGB of an operative’s arrival to and departure from a country, request a meeting, or announce an emergency. In addition to assessing the existing signal language used among operatives, the KGB also instructed Halef to collect the data necessary to set up new surveillance locations in a number of countries. In 1977, Halef was performing assignments in Pakistan and Burma. In 1978, he and his wife were engaged in assignments throughout the USSR. From the USSR, they were relocated to the GDR and then to Bulgaria, where they boarded a cruise ship going from Varny to Suhumi to survey the ports of the Black Sea basin. Traveling through Odessa, Halef photographed military vessels and observed the procedures of the border patrol and customs officers.

  • June, 2007

    The Richard Zorge Case. Folder 59. The Chekist Anthology

    In this entry, Mitrokhin recounts how during the 1960s the leadership of the KGB had shown its Dzerzhinsky Central Club agents a 2-part French movie entitled “Who Are You, Doctor Zorge?” A Soviet spy, Zorge aroused much interest within the ranks of the KGB. Drawing upon KGB files, Mitrokhin states how Zakharov, the Deputy Director of the KGB, consequently issued an order to prepare a report on Zorge.