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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • April 10, 1967

    Zhou Enlai's Talk with Pham Van Dong and Vo Nguyen Giap

    Excerpt from the talk in which Zhou Enlai offers encouragement and advice concerning the Vietnam War

  • April 10, 1967

    Discussion between Zhou Enlai and Pham Van Dong

    Zhou Enlai discusses expansion of Vietnam War, as well as the development of a new front in Cambodia; also, a discussion on Prince Sihanouk and Lon Nol.

  • April 11, 1967

    Zhou Enlai's Talk with Pham Van Dong and Vo Nguyen Giap

    Zhou Enlai warns the Vietnamese delegation not to bend to Soviet demands.

  • April 11, 1967

    Discussion between Mao Zedong, Pham Van Dong and Vo Nguyen Giap

    Mao Zedong encourages Pham Van Dong to continue fighting and praises the Vietnamese on the resiliency, not only in the war against the Americans, but against the French and Japanese.

  • April 11, 1967

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in China to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Kim Jae-seok reports on North Korea's stance regarding China's Cultural Revolution.

  • April 11, 1967

    Discussion between Chinese and Vietnamese delegations

    Zhou Enlai recounts previous relations concerning Taiwan and the GMD, America and the Soviet Union within the context of China’s recent history. He also emphasizes the need for Cambodian support.

  • April 12, 1967

    Intelligence Note from Thomas L. Hughes to the Acting Secretary, 'Soviets Continue to Denounce American Interpretation of Nonproliferation Treaty'

    The Soviets were insisting that article III on safeguards mention only the IAEA but not the European Atomic Energy Community [EURATOM], even though West Germany and other EURATOM members resisted the idea of IAEA inspections in Western Europe. It would take quite a few months before the Article III wording was to everyone’s satisfaction, but the Soviets also objected to US interpretations of the proposed Article II which would permit a nuclear-armed, united Western Europe.

  • April 12, 1967

    Memorandum of Conversation between Norwegian Ambassador Arne Gunneng and ACDA Director Foster, 'Non-Proliferation Treaty'

    In this conversation, Director Foster and Norwegian Ambassador Gunneng discussed the state of the NPT negotiations and the U.S. consultations with West Germany. Foster made comments about Italy and West Germany being inflexible, and Gunneng stated that it would cost the country "a great deal internationally" if they continued to block progress.

  • April 12, 1967

    Hungarian Workers Party CC Minutes of Meeting held on 12 April 1967

    Members of the Hungarian Central Committee discuss recent trips to Moscow and Budapest. Those involved debrief the group on discussions at both locations over the domestic situation in China and its possible repercussions for international communism.

  • April 12, 1967

    Discussion between Zhou Enlai, Chen Yi, Pham Van Dong and Vo Nguyen Giap

    Zhou Enlai discusses the class struggle present in China.

  • April 14, 1967

    Intelligence Note 292 from Secret Allan Evans to the Acting Secretary, 'Japanese Expert Considers Nuclear Defense'

    INR assessed several recent newspaper articles by Kiichi Saeki, a defense expert close to the government, whose thinking was “noteworthy for [its] frank consideration of Japan’s need for nuclear-defense planning to cope with Communist China’s growing potential.”

  • April 14, 1967

    Telegram from Pyongyang to Bucharest, No.73.130, TOP SECRET, April 14, 1967

    A report on the tensions provoked resulting from incidents near the 38th parallel.

  • April 14, 1967

    Gosteleradio Memo to CPSU Central Committee, 'Ideological Subversion on the Airwaves of Foreign Radio Stations Broadcasting in the Russian language'

    This memo from N. Mesyatsev, Chairman, Broadcast and Television Committee, Council of Ministers, analyzes Western radio “propaganda” and credits Western broadcasts with being “an effective tool of ideological intervention.” The document notes that the broadcasts pay attention to Soviet dissidents, and mentions their use of humor and Western music.

  • April 15, 1967

    Telegram from Pyongyang to Bucharest, No.76.134, TOP SECRET, April 15, 1967

    An analysis of the causes of the incidents on the 38th parallel by delegates to the Neutral Nations Supervisory Comission.

  • April 16, 1967

    Telegram from the Romanian Embassy in Teheran, No. 84.075

    Dranceanu recounts a conversation with the Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi. It was brought up that Moscow had suggested that the socialist countries could build a 'consortium' that would receive Iranian oil via a pipeline through the Soviet territory.

  • April 18, 1967

    Telegram from Pyongyang to Bucharest, No.76137, TOP SECRET, April 18, 1967

    The remarks of a Vietnamese diplomat on the incidents between South and North Korea, who explains that the South and North exploit tensions for their own political agendas.

  • April 20, 1967

    US Embassy Bonn Telegram 12582 to State Department, 'NPT—Duration,' partly garbled transmission

    A message from the Bonn embassy highlighted an issue that had been raised by West German diplomats and which Ambassador McGhee correctly believed represented thinking at the top: Chancellor Kiesinger’s objection to an NPT “of unlimited duration.”

  • April 21, 1967

    'The President’s Trip to Germany (Chancellor Adenauer's Funeral), April 1967, Background Paper, The Non-Proliferation Treaty and Germany'

    This document detailed West German suggestions which Washington incorporated into the NPT draft.The cover memorandum reviewed the sources of West German discontent with the NPT.

  • April 21, 1967

    Research Memorandum RSB-46 from Thomas L. Hughes to the Secretary, 'Soviet Policy on Nonproliferation Moves in Two Directions'

    Not altogether sure whether the Soviets were really committed to the NPT, the fact that the Soviets had been discussing security assurances with the Indians was seen as evidence that Moscow was interested in having a treaty. India was one of the countries that was especially resistant to the NPT and the Soviets were only one of a number of governments, e.g. Canada, which vainly tried to persuade Indira Gandhi to sign on.

  • April 26, 1967

    Memorandum of Conversation between Secretary of State Dean Rusk and Foreign Minister Willie Brandt, 'Non-Proliferation Treaty'

    During this meeting, Brandt and Rusk discussed the French attitude toward a West German signature on the NPT, thew problem of "duration", and suggestions for mitigating the West German concerns. Brandt said that De Gaulle “expected” Bonn to sign but if that de Gaulle was asked for advice, he would recommend that Germany not sign.