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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • August 01, 1975

    Memorandum of Conversation, 'Economic Policy/Cyprus; French Nuclear Programs; Energy'

    Transcript of a conversation between President Ford, Henry Kissinger, and French President Valéry Giscard d'Estaing. The conversation opens with a discussion of economic policy and the embargo on northern Cyprus following the 1974 Turkish invasion. Giscard then asks about the slow progress of US technical assistance to the French nuclear program. Lastly they discuss energy and oil prices.

  • September 23, 1975

    Memorandum from George S. Vest to Secretary of State, 'September 16-17 Nuclear Suppliers' Meeting'

    The September 1975 meeting of the suppliers’ group brought out a conflict over a decisive issue, whether supplying countries should require recipient countries to place all nuclear facilities under safeguards or require them only for the technology and supplies at issue in the contract (“project safeguards”). The Canadians strongly supported the former, “full scope safeguards” (their terminology, which caught on), which the French saw as “tantamount to imposing NPT obligations” --a reference to the Treaty’s Article III--which they would not accept.

  • October 15, 1975

    Memorandum of Conversation, 'Visit of Secretary of State and Mrs. Kissinger to Canada; Luncheon at 24 Sussex Drive'

    This memo contains a transcription of the conversation that took place when Secretary Kissinger and his wife visited Canada and had lunch with Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau, along with many other officials.

  • October 21, 1975

    Memorandum of Conversation between Mao Zedong and Henry A. Kissinger

    U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger met Chairman Mao at his residence in Peking. The two argued about the importance of U.S.-Chinese relations in American politics. Mao repeats that the United States' concerns order America, the Soviet Union, Europe, Japan, and lastly China. Kissinger responds that the Soviet Union, as a superpower, is frequently dealt with, but in strategy China is a priority. Throughout the conversation, Mao continues to point out his old age and failing health. The leaders also discuss European unity, Japanese hegemony, German reunification, and the New York Times.

  • October 23, 1975

    Telegram from Pyongyang to Bucharest, No. 059.298

    Pope discusses DPRK representatives' attempt to establish contacts with Henry Kissinger via China as Heo Dam is scheduled to meet Henry Kissinger after the latter's visit to Beijing.

  • November 27, 1975

    Cable, Henry Kissinger, 'Angola: SAG Requests USG Provide FNLA/UNITA with Military Equipment'

    Response to a request made by the South African Defense Forces Chief of Staff to supply UNITA/FNLA. The US believes that UNITA/FNLA are receiving sufficient support to meet their defensive needs.

  • December 02, 1975

    Memorandum of Conversation between Mao Zedong and Gerald R. Ford

    President Ford and Secretary Kissinger met with Chairman Mao and spoke about Chinese-U.S. relations, Japanese-U.S. relations, Chinese foreign relations with Japan and Western countries, NATO, the Sinai Agreement, and Soviet attempts to expand influence in Africa.

  • December 03, 1975

    Memorandum of Conversation with Chinese Delegation led by Vice Premier Deng Xiaoping

    Chinese delegation visits the White House and discusses Angola. The Chinese emphasize that South Africa must exit the conflict if there is to be any chance of rallying other African states to oppose Neto.

  • December 31, 1975

    Memorandum from George S. Springsteen, Executive Secretary, to National Security Adviser Brent Scowcroft, 'Nuclear Suppliers Guidelines'

    This document comprises the instructions which the White House approved for the September 1975 suppliers’ meeting. At the November meeting, the suppliers completed negotiations on guidelines. Basic provisions included agreement to seek assurances by recipients of supplies not to produce nuclear explosive devices, physical security for installations and materials, transfer of trigger list items only under IAEA safeguards, restraint in transfer of sensitive technologies, facilities and materials, and the encouragement of supplier involvement in, and multinational controls over, sensitive installations. Appended to the guidelines was a two page “trigger list” based on the Zangger Committee’s list.

  • January 14, 1976

    US Department of State Cable, ROK Reprocessing Plant

    A heavily redacted report on the U.S.-Canadian consensus that South Korea should not be able to obtain a nuclear weapons capability.

  • January 27, 1976

    George Vest to the Secretary, 'Nuclear Suppliers Status Report'

    In this document regarding the final agreement, George Vest wrote Kissinger that it “served to close many of the loopholes and inadequacies of previous nuclear cooperation agreements between suppliers and recipients.” It also put the French and West Germans on record to restrict access to sensitive nuclear technologies. Nevertheless, as Vest noted, the guidelines would not prevent “indigenous” development of nuclear capabilities and “unsafeguarded developments” or the acquisition of sensitive technology.

  • June 11, 1976

    George Vest to the Secretary of State, 'London Nuclear Suppliers Meeting'

    This document provides an overview of the London Nuclear Suppliers' Meeting which included the addition of the five newest countries to the original seven. Most old and new members were receptive when Washington lobbied them to support a “long term and stable regime of restraint” on the export of sensitive enrichment and reprocessing technology. While the French were supportive of the moratorium proposal, the Germans were uncomfortable with it, not least because of the implications for their deal with Brazil.

  • June 23, 1976

    Conversation between Prime Minister of South Africa Balthazar Vorster and US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger

    Meeting of a US delegation headed by Henry Kissinger with South African officials including Prime Minister Vorster on the topic of the situation in Rhodesia, Smith's rule there, the military situation in that country, and the potential involvement of Cuba or China in the conflict.

  • September 28, 1976

    Telegram to the President from the Minister of Foreign Affairs, 'Report on the Meeting between the Foreign Minister of the ROK and the US Secretary of State and Foreign Ministers of the ROK and Japan'

    A report on the conversation between Minister of Foreign Affairs Pak Tong-Jin and US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. The relationship between South Korea, North Korea, and the United States are discussed and linked with specific issues such as the Axe Murder Incident and conversations between US and North Korea.

  • September 29, 1976

    Discussion between SWAPO with Dr Henry Kissinger, US Secretary of State, in New York

    Dr. Kissinger expresses his proposal for a conference on Namibia to be attended by SWAPO (South West Africa People's Organization), Turnhalle members, and South Africa. The Conference concerned the ongoing struggle for independence by Namibian guerrillas from South African rule. Kissinger pledged US support to SWAPO as the leading force in Namibia, but Namibian delegates responded that they would not attend the conference unless South Africa met all preconditions including the withdrawal of troops from Namibian territory.

  • October 08, 1976

    Background Papers, Kissinger Proposals at Geneva Conference

    An examination of the consequences of Kissinger's proposal at the Geneva Conference. An overview of South Africa's predicament when it comes to Rhodesia.

  • December 07, 1976

    Report for South African Prime Minister Balthazar Vorster from ADR, Prime Minister's Return to Geneva

    Description of the situation at the Geneva Conference, the lack of Kissinger's presence due to Ford's electoral defeat, and the South African realization that the chance for a peace settlement at Geneva is almost gone.

  • March 01, 1984

    Telegram by the Ambassador to the United States Petrignani to Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Prospects of resuming the FNI negotiations'

    Ambassador Petrignani reports his conversation with Vice Secretary of State Burt following Kissinger's interview in Time where he talks about NATO's crisis and need for burden sharing reform. Burt distances the current administration from Kissinger's views, stating instead that euro-american relations are "in good health", and there is no need for drastic measures.

  • January 17, 1989

    Record of Conversation between M. S. Gorbachev and H. Kissinger

    Gorbachev and Kissinger discuss opening up a secret line of communication between Soviet Union and the US, facilitated by Kissinger and Brent Scowcroft, and coordinating a visit between President Bush and Gorbachev in the near future.