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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • July 19, 1954

    Minutes of Conversation between Zhang Wentian and Harold Caccia, Second Meeting of 19 July

    Zhou meets with Eden to discuss five points: the demarcation line in Vietnam, elections, the international supervisory committee, withdrawal of foreign troops, and a guarantee that collective measures will be taken if a breech of an agreement is made.

  • July 19, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding the Situation at the Twenty-third Restricted Session

    Zhou reports on the 23rd restricted session on Indochina. The delegates of the conference hope to make an agreement on the 20th. Zhou notes that both the Chinese/Russian side and the other side have begun to make compromises, however Bao Dai's Vietnamese delegation refused to the division of Vietnam.

  • July 19, 1954

    From the Journal of Molotov: Secret Memorandum of Conversation with Eden at his Villa in Geneva, 10:00 p.m.

    Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav M. Molotov and British Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden discuss the progress of the Geneva Conference thus far. They discuss the withdrawal of troops from Laos and Cambodia, the situations in Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam, and how best to solve these situations. They also discuss the relations between France and Vietnam.

  • July 20, 1954

    Telegram, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Others, Regarding Zhou’s Meetings with Pierre Mendes-France and Eden, as well as Discussions Outside the Conference

    Zhou reports on his meeting with Medes-France and Eden. Though Zhou notes they have found a solution for the election date in Vietnam, the parties still must work out issues of regrouping areas and troop withdrawal.

  • July 20, 1954

    Minutes of Conversation between Zhou Enlai and Cambodian Foreign Minister Tep Phan (Summary)

    Zhou Enlai and Tep Phan discuss the Vietnamese proposal for conflict resolution. The Cambodian side discusses issues on which they agree with the Vietnamese (that the Vietnamese will not be discriminated against in Cambodia, that there will be no combatant personnel in Cambodia, etc.) and issues on which they disagree (military issues, Viet Minh withdrawal timetable, etc.). Zhou expresses hope that these issues will be resolved in an upcoming meeting with the Vietnamese, and that he will do what he can to assist in the resolution.

  • July 29, 1954

    Telegram #498 from K. Novikov to V. M. Molotov

    Telegram from K. Novikov discusses proposals regarding questions by Pham Van Dong. Proposals regarding travel of Hoan Van Hoan, Ho Van Lo and others to Delhi for conference; the provision of ships for transporting Democratic Republic of Vietnam forces from southern zone to northern zone of Vietnam; the dispatch of a Soviet military advisor group to Vietnam; and assistance to Vietnamese for drafting a plan to fulfill economic needs of the DRV.

  • October 21, 1954

    Talking Points from Premier Zhou Enlai’s Third Meeting with Nehru

    Zhou Enlai and Nehru discuss Sino-Indian relations, as well as China and India's views toward Thailand, Indonesia, Korea, Vietnam, and Ceylon (Sri Lanka).

  • October 21, 1954

    Minutes of the Third Meeting between Premier Zhou Enlai and Nehru

    Zhou and Nehru discuss developments in South Asia and Southeast Asia.

  • November 14, 1954

    Jawaharlal Nehru, 'Note on Visit to China and Indo-China'

    Nehru gives a detailed report on his visit to China and Indo-China. He first gives a summary of the issues and topics he covered in discussions in China with Zhou En-Lai and Mao, which covered a broad range of subjects including China's Five Year Plan, and various foreign policy issues. Nehru then describes his visit to Indochina, where he speaks with Ho Chi Minh (five days after he takes control of Hanoi) in North Vietnam, and also tours South Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia.

  • December 29, 1954

    Telegram #982 from K. Novikov to V. M. Molotov

    Telegram discussing statements of Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, Pham Van Dong, regarding critique of Ngo Din Diem.

  • 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'List of Problems Between China and Other Asian-African Countries'

    A list of problems between China and other Asian-African countries

  • 1955

    Instructions for Talks with the State Delegation of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam

    Instructions outlining topics of discussion for an upcoming meeting between Soviet officials and Democratic Republic of Vietnam leader Ho Chi Minh. Main topics of discussion in the first section include the Geneva agreements, relations with France, counteracting US plans in Indo-China, Laos and Cambodia, the United National Front, land reform, and the evacuation of Catholics to South Vietnam. Discussion points on DVR-Soviet Union relations include economic and technical assistance, trade, shipments to the Vietnamese People’s Army, the provision of credit, training DRV specialists in the USSR, advisors and Russian language teachers, military, and the Joint Communiqué.

  • January 16, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Draft of the Tentative Working Plan for Participating in the Asian-African Conference'

    The note stated that the Asian-African Conference could be a great contribution in establishing international peace. Among the participants, there were Chinese allies, neutral countries, and American allies. China had to isolate American power in the Conference and befriend the neutral countries. The Chinese Foreign Ministry therefore drafted the plan accordingly.

  • March 08, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Trade, 'Plan for Our participation in theTtrade Activities of the Asian-African Conference (Draft)'

    The Department of International Trade estimated that the Asian-African Conference would be a good occasion to strengthen economic and trade relations with the participating countries. The Department of International Trade therefore made the recommendations to befriend with these former colonies for developing strong economic and political relations.

  • March 12, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Trade, 'Scheme for Our Participation in the Trade Activities of the Asian-African Conference (Revised Draft) (Preliminary Paper)'

    The Department of International Trade estimated that the Asian-African Conference would be a good occasion to strengthen economic and trade relations with the participating countries. The Department of International Trade therefore made the recommendations to befriend with these former colonies for developing strong economic and political relations. This is the modified version of the draft plan that was issued earlier.

  • March 19, 1955

    Telegram to V. M. Molotov on Report of the Agency France Press

    Telegram from V. Kuznetsov about the French Minister of Foreign Affairs Piné's statement that a conference of the three powers has been called to discuss problems of Indo-China and implementation of Geneva accords. The telegram concludes that a meeting is needed with Piné to demonstrate that the Soviet Union is firmly monitoring any Geneva accord violations.

  • March 21, 1955

    Letter from Humphrey Trevelyan to Zhou Enlai

  • March 28, 1955

    Report on a Trip to Vietnam

    Choi Duk Shin and Young P. Lee summarize their travels through Hong Kong, Bangkok, and Vietnam, including their discussions on politics, military situations, cultural sharing, and strategies for Free Asia to join together against Communism.

  • April 01, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'The Asian-African Conference'

    The note covers the background, achievements, and influence of the Asian-African Conference. It states that the Conference was initiated because Asian and African countries gained their independence after the Second World War and wanted to tackle the imperialism and colonialism. After the Conference, there was an increase of anti-imperialism sentiment among the Asian and African countries.

  • April 04, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Draft Plan for Attending the Asian-African Conference'

    The participants in the Asian-African Conference had the common interest in pursuing international peace and national economic and cultural development. China should take the advantage of this Conference to promote national independence movement and to establish stronger relations with Asian and African countries. According to this goal, the plan listed the common issues that all participants faced, the issues that existed between China and other countries, and the issues that China alone was facing. It also spelled out the relations of China and different groups of counties in the Conference, as well as the logistic issues.