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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • February 03, 1949

    Memorandum of Conversation between Anastas Mikoyan and Mao Zedong

    Anastas Mikoyan and Mao Zedong converse about the mediation talks between the CCP and the Guomindang, Yugoslavia, coordination between the communist parties of the Asian countries, and the history of the CCP.

  • February 05, 1949

    Memorandum of Conversation between Anastas Mikoyan and Mao Zedong

    Anastas Mikoyan and Mao Zedong discuss the role of foreign capital in China, Chinese intelligentsia, the role of criticism and self-criticism in the CCP, CCP tasks in the army, the level of China's industrial development, the Chinese attitude toward foreign property, and the road and character of the Chinese revolution. (Day)

  • December 16, 1949

    Record of Conversation between I.V. Stalin and Chairman of the Central People's Government of the People's Republic of China Mao Zedong on 16 December 1949

    First meeting between Mao and Stalin. The two discuss war and peace, as well as the question of the new treaty between China and the USSR. Stalin voices himself against signing a new treaty, citing the Yalta agreement. Mao promises to reconsider his position. Mao says he is in favor of keeping Soviet troops in Port Arthur. Stalin promises not to "run away" from China. Mao requests a credit of 300 million dollars, as well as the Soviet aid in liberating Taiwan. Stalin warns Mao not to give the Americans a pretext to intervene in China. Mao says that several countries are interested in establishing diplomatic relations with China but that China should wait before doing so. Stalin agrees with this strategy.

  • January 14, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Hu Qiaomu

    Mao Zedong gives instructions to Hu Qiaomu on how to write about recent developments within the Japanese Communist Party.

  • October 05, 1950

    Letter, Cde. Filippov [Stalin] for Mao Zedong

    Stalin describes the US inability to engage in a "big war" and encourages Kim in his fight against the US. He also discusses the domestic situation in China.

  • January, 1951

    Contract, Goverment of Republic of Korea and CDT Corporation

    Detailed agreement on the price of scrap collected in Korea, and arrangements for shipping.

  • January 20, 1951

    Report from P. F. Yudin to I. V. Stalin on Meetings with the Leaders of the Communist Party of China, including Mao Zedong on 31 December 1950

    Yudin recounts his meetings with Mao Zedong, Liu Shaoqi, and Zhou Enlai. In three meetings, Yudin learned more about China's relations with other communist parties in Asia, economic conditions in China, and developments in the Korean War.

  • July 20, 1951

    Ciphered Telegram from Mao Zedong to Filippov [Stalin]

    Telegram from Mao to Stalin discussing the points of agreement and disagreement between the Korean-Chinese and Anglo-American representatives of armistice negotiations.

  • August 12, 1951

    Telegram, Soviet Foreign Ministry to N. V. Roshchin (Soviet Ambassador in Beijing)

    Message from the Soviet Foreign Ministry to its Ambassador to the PRC Roshchin, instructing him to inform Zhou Enlai of the USSR's intent to reluctantly take part in the peace conference at San Francisco.

  • September 03, 1951

    Zhou Enlai’s Speech to the Central People’s Government Council, 'The Korean Ceasefire Negotiations and Making Peace with Japan'

    Speech by Zhou Enlai emphasizing the need to remain steadfast during negotiations with America on the Korean issue, in order to assure that the treaty is favorable to China and Korea. Notes that aiding Korea and resisting the United States is the only way to prevent Western dominance of East Asia.

  • August 28, 1952

    Cable, Zhou Enlai to Chairman Mao [Zedong] and the Central Committee

    Zhou reports on the latest negotiations with the Soviet Union concerning the Changchun Railway, the Lüshun Port, and a rubber agreement. Zhou and Molotov also discussed the possibility of signing peace treaties with Japan.

  • September 20, 1952

    Report, Zhou Enlai to the Chairman [Mao Zedong], Comrade [Liu] Shaoqi, and the Central Committee

    Zhou and Stalin discuss potential meetings with representatives from Vietnam, Indonesia, and Japan.

  • August 06, 1953

    Summary Record of the Conference held between President Rhee and Secretary Dulles (Second Session)

    During the second Dulles-Rhee conference, President Rhee and Secretary Dulles led the discussion with the subject of Korean rehabilitation. Rhee makes a few suggestions that both sides should consider if Korean reconstruction should take place. These suggestions include: 1) rehabilitating Korean productive industry, 2) directly allocating money for Korea’s rehabilitation instead of doing so through the reconstruction of the Japanese economy and, 3) prevent the importation of Japanese technicians to Korea. Dulles answers he will consider Rhee suggestions, however, the US will continue to aid Japan to prevent losing her to communism.

  • August 14, 1953

    Memorandum, President Syngman Rhee to All Diplomatic Officials

    Following the ratification of the Armistice Agreement and the Mutual Defense Treaty, President Rhee conveys that he expects the Armistice to fail because the communists will “undoubtedly” violate it and undermine Korean independence. Rhee wants to renew war to secure victory but most importantly to strengthen the ROK-U.S alliance. Following the memorandum he makes twelve points ranging from topic like Korean rehabilitation to prisoners of war from the Korean War.

  • March 04, 1954

    Letter, President Syngman Rhee to General Van Fleet

    President Rhee once again suggests that the US government should increase the ROK defense forces. It will not only be cheaper to fund Korean (over American) divisions, it also means that Americans do not need to fight in Korea. Rhee then negotiates that if the US government implements the necessary military buildup aid, he too will not take any “unilateral action” for or against the future Geneva Conference until after it has been in session. Finally, Rhee advocates his disapproval of US interest to build up Japan.

  • March 06, 1954

    From the Journal of Molotov: Secret Memorandum of Conversation between Molotov and PRC Ambassador Zhang Wentian

    Soviet Foreign Minister Molotov and PRC Ambassador to the USSR Zhang Wentian discuss their respective views on the situations in Korea and Vietnam in preparation for the upcoming Geneva Conference.

  • June 15, 1954

    Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist Conference, Minutes of the Opening Session

    Delegates from South Korea, China, Macao, the Philippines, and the Ryukyu Islands discuss the anti-communist struggle in the Asia Pacific.

  • June 15, 1954

    Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist Conference, Provisional Summary Record of the Opening Session

    Delegates from South Korea, China, Macao, the Philippines, and the Ryukyu Islands discuss the anti-communist struggle in the Asia Pacific.

  • June 16, 1954

    Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist Conference, Speech by the Ryukyu Delegate Mr. Tsai Chang

    Tsai Chang discusses the situation in the Ryukyu Islands and the activities of communists in Japan.

  • July 05, 1954

    From the Journal of V. V. Vaskov, 27 August 1954: Top Secret Memorandum of Conversation with Comrade Mao Zedong on 5 July 1954

    Soviet Charge d’Affaires in Beijing V.V. Vaskov and Comrade Mao Zedong discuss the Soviet plans to take advantage of the changing situation in France. Mao mentions that Zhou is meeting with Ho Chi Ming and Vo Nguyen Giap in Guanxi and won't be able to come to Geneva until July 12-13. The topic of conversation then shifts to the US and a recent meeting between US President Eisenhower and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. Mao notes that there is a diverge between Eisenhower and Churchill regarding the desirability of a dialogue with the Communists. Mao says that the US has dispersed its forces far and wide, so they are trying to resurrect West Germany and Japan.